MIT Technology Review’s Annual EmTech Event Reimagined online

0 Comments

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — MIT Technology Review’s annual EmTech MIT conference will take place October 19-22, 2020. This online event delves deep into the year’s most important developments in AI, biomedicine, cybersecurity, diversity, equality, and global-scale technology—all in a reimagined, immersive, virtual format focused on the attendee experience. See the full EmTech MIT conference agenda and register.

MIT Technology Review EmTech Logo (PRNewsFoto/MIT Technology Review) (PRNewsfoto/MIT Technology Review)

Attendees will hear from and engage with leaders, researchers, and innovators from across the globe representing companies and organizations that impact our daily lives, including Amazon, Facebook, Google, Salesforce, Twitter, Gavi, Lilly Research Laboratories, the Scripps Research Institute, and more. Featured speakers include:

  • Parag Agrawal, CTO | Twitter
  • Marc Benioff, Chair, CEO, and Cofounder | Salesforce
  • Seth Berkley, CEO | Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance
  • Mai-Lan Tomsen Bukovec, Global Vice President | Amazon Web Services
  • Geoffrey Hinton, VP and Engineering Fellow | Google
  • Anne Neuberger, Director of Cybersecurity | NSA
  • Mike Schroepfer, CTO | Facebook
  • Megan Smith, Former US CTO; CEO and Founder | shift7
  • Astro Teller, Captain of Moonshots (CEO) | Alphabet’s X

New for 2020: EmTech MIT attendees may choose from a selection of interactive sessions with engaging discussions and behind-the-scenes access to labs and researchers on the MIT campus. Options include:

  • Meet the Researchers: Chat with researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab about their latest projects
  • Inside the Lab: Get a behind-the-scenes view of some of MIT’s most innovative labs and join a Q&A session
  • Master Classes: Explainer sessions led by MIT experts to help you better understand the technologies being explored on the main stage
  • Innovators’ Think Tanks: Tune in as the Innovators Under 35 brainstorm solutions to some of the world’s biggest problems

Intel, a technology leader shaping the data-centric future

In Science We Trust – Rolling Stone

0 Comments

In a world reeling from the Covid-19 pandemic, the role of science has been brought into sharp focus. Chief scientific advisors, epidemiologists and infectious disease experts have become household names around the world; all hopes pinned on pioneers of modern medicine to provide the escape route: a vaccine. We are guzzling up information with newfound gusto, hungry for the facts of science over the disorientation of hearsay, rumor and rhetoric.

Yet, this spotlight on science is more an anomaly than a normality in the wider context. Society still isn’t embracing the full potential of science. Opportunities built on the foundations of scientific understanding to advance humanity are being missed.

Unlike questions raised over policies, laws, and opinion, science only ever speaks in evidence and data. Used well it can cut through the minefield of opinions and lay the groundwork for forward-thinking decisions. More urgently than ever, it’s time for decision-makers to put their trust in the opportunities science and technology present to lead us into a better future.

Prioritizing science in this way not only makes sense, it echoes the calls of public opinion. A new Philip Morris International (PMI) white paper, “In Support of the Primacy of Science,” revealed that 84 percent of people polled across 19 countries want their governments to take recent findings into account when crafting policy. However, just 51 percent of those individuals believe their leaders are doing so.

The Public Wants Action From Lawmakers and Businesses Leaders

PMI’s white paper also revealed that 77 percent of respondents believe that scientific advancements can solve the world’s most pressing issues. However, those surveyed aren’t convinced that society recognizes the importance of science in our lives. While industry experts and researchers espouse science’s value, just 45 percent of the PMI survey sample thought the public held it

Google, NASA, PayPal and the World Bank to Headline Neo4j’s NODES 2020 Developer Conference

0 Comments

SAN MATEO, Calif., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Neo4j, the leader in graph technology, announced today the key highlights for the second-annual Neo4j Online Developer Expo and Summit (NODES).

The one-day virtual conference is expected to attract more than 10,000 developers and data scientists on October 20th. The program includes diverse, interactive sessions delivered by graph experts on topics ranging from anti-money laundering and cybersecurity to contact tracing and automotive design. This year, NODES welcomes over 70 speakers from across the globe.

Michael Hunger, Director of Developer Relations at Neo4j, commented on hosting the world’s largest gathering of graph developers and data scientists.

“NODES 2020 brings together thousands of graph practitioners from all over the world to connect, share and learn about a broad range of topics from data science and visualization to application development and use case deep dives,” said Hunger. “It is gratifying to see the community share their passion for applying graphs to challenging data problems in areas such as healthcare, retail, recommendations and fraud investigations. NODES attendees will be the first to learn about Neo4j’s future technology plans.”

Neo4j is grateful to its 2020 NODES sponsors Google Cloud, Precisely, Internuntius, LARUS, Crosscode, Linkurious, Structr, GraphAware, Kineviz, Hackolade, and yWorks.

Key highlights of the event include:

  • Emil Eifrem, CEO and Co-Founder of Neo4j, speaking on the future of graph technology and the ICIJ’s latest FinCEN Files investigation
  • Google Cloud as the headlining Platinum Sponsor, speaking on developing applications with Neo4j Aura

Army partners with University of Illinois on autonomous drone swarm technology

0 Comments

Army researchers are working with the University of Illinois Chicago on unmanned technology for recharging drone swarms.

The university has been awarded a four-year, $8 million cooperative agreement “to develop foundational science in two critical propulsion and power technology areas for powering future families of unmanned aircraft systems,” according to a statement released by the Army Research Laboratory.

“This collaborative program will help small battery-powered drones autonomously return from military missions to unmanned ground vehicles for recharging,” the Army added. “The university is developing algorithms to enable route planning for multiple teams of small unmanned air and ground vehicles.”

ARMY DEVELOPING DRONES THAT CAN CHANGE SHAPE MID-FLIGHT

The military is looking to make the process of recharging vast drone swarms as efficiently as possible by using fast, recharging batteries and wireless power transfer technologies. This, researchers say, will let multiple drones to hover over an unmanned ground vehicle and recharge wirelessly.

Army researchers are working with the University of Illinois Chicago on the drone recharging system.

Army researchers are working with the University of Illinois Chicago on the drone recharging system.
(Courtesy University of Illinois Chicago)

“Imagine in the future, the Army deploying a swarm of hundreds or thousands of unmanned aerial systems,” said Dr. Mike Kweon, program manager for the laboratory’s Versatile Tactical Power and Propulsion Essential Research Program, in the statement. “Each of these systems has only roughly 26 minutes with the current battery technologies to conduct a flight mission and return to their home before they lose battery power, which means all of them could conceivably return at the same time to have their batteries replaced.”

“Soldiers would need to carry a few thousand batteries on missions to facilitate this, which is logistically overwhelming and overall, not conducive to a leading expeditionary military operation,” Kweon added. “With this research project, we’re operationalizing scientific endeavors to increase Soldier readiness on the battlefields of

Superconductor technology for smaller, sooner fusion

0 Comments

Superconductor technology for smaller, sooner fusion
The assembly designed for the third SULTAN cable test features two 3-meter VIPER HTS cables in parallel and connected with a copper joint at the bottom; cryogenic helium and electrical current are injected at the top.once installed in SULTAN. The outer superstructure provides structural support to react the enormous lateral electromechanical body loads generated within the cables during testing. A unique aspect of this design, provided by the materials and the trapezoidal extension at the mid-plane, is the ability to axial strain the cables during testing to better replicate the conditions that would be experienced by VIPER cableswithin a high-field magnet. Credit: Jose Estrada/PSFC

Scientists have long sought to harness fusion as an inexhaustible and carbon-free energy source. Within the past few years, groundbreaking high-temperature superconductor technology (HTS) sparked a new vision for achieving practical fusion energy. This approach, known as the high-field pathway to fusion, aims to generate fusion in compact devices on a shorter timescale and lower cost than alternative approaches.


A key technical challenge to realizing this vision, though, has been getting HTS superconductors to work in an integrated way in the development of new, high-performance superconducting magnets, which will enable higher magnetic fields than previous generations of magnets, and are central to confining and controlling plasma reactions.

Now a team led by MIT’s Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) and MIT spinout company Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS), has developed and extensively tested an HTS cable technology that can be scaled and engineered into the high-performance magnets. The team’s research was published on Oct. 7 in Superconductor Science and Technology. Researchers included MIT assistant professor and principal investigator Zachary Hartwig; PSFC Deputy Head of Engineering Rui F. Vieira and other key PSFC technical and engineering staff; CFS Chief Science Officer Brandon Sorbom Ph.D. ’17 and other