Shining A Spotlight On Corporate Readiness Through The Lens Of Learning And Development

0 Comments

CEO of AllenComm since 2003.

Corporate leaders have long understood that demonstrating value to shareholders must include navigating and managing change. From the early days of Kurt Lewin’s change management model, it has been well understood that companies need to adequately prepare for both sudden unexpected shifts and gradual changes.

The current economic and health crises have propelled organizations toward long-overdue examinations of the role of employee training and development in shaping corporate readiness. It’s often said that 70% of change initiatives fail. While the Harvard Business Review has estimated that number is actually around 10%, it should still be no surprise that failure to adapt to changes due to the coronavirus can have far-reaching ramifications for employees and stockholders.

Although industries have seen several sudden disruptions due to advancements in technology, sudden changes due to Covid-19 have revealed unexpected challenges. Some organizations quickly overcame or adapted to these challenges; others have not. Moreover, as the CEO of a company that provides corporate training solutions, I’ve observed that the difference between the two types of organizations is the heavy use of learning and development teams or performance consultants to further organizational readiness.

So, perhaps it would be beneficial for business leaders to expand upon their definition of “readiness” to encompass the supporting role their learning and development teams can play. While it’s important to categorically separate technology and infrastructure preparedness from people readiness, L&D teams have a unique, multi-faceted role in both.

The Role Of L&D In Corporate Readiness

For this discussion, readiness is a state of preparedness of persons, systems or organizations to meet a situation and carry out a planned sequence of actions. The first step for human resources and L&D is to define how these resources come in to play both for corporate readiness and, more

Alion Awarded $73 Million Task Order to Provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment Research and Development

0 Comments

WASHINGTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Navy has awarded Alion Science and Technology a $73 million task order with a 60-month period of performance to provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment (JTSE) Research and Development (R&D) for Joint Staff J7, Deputy Director Joint Training (JS J7 DDJT) Environment Architecture Division (EAD). Alion was awarded this contract under the Department of Defense Information Analysis Center’s (DoD IAC) multiple-award contract (MAC) vehicle. These DoD IAC MAC task orders (TOs) are awarded by the U.S. Air Force’s 774th Enterprise Sourcing Squadron to develop and create new knowledge for the enhancement of the DTIC repository and the R&D and S&T community.

(PRNewsfoto/Alion Science and Technology Co)

“We are dedicated to our continued customer partnership to develop joint virtual environments to prepare for Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2),” said Katie Selbe, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Alion’s Cyber Network Solutions Group. “Alion has a deep understanding of the JTSE program and its requirements. Our team has been at the forefront of developing Joint Synthetic Training Environments for over 20 years and provides a seamless transition for on-going capability development.”

The JTSE is one of the critical enablers that supports the delivery of trained, capable, and interoperable Joint Forces. The scope of this effort includes providing a full range of application design, development, and integration efforts to modernize the technical architecture supporting joint forces training exercises. The architecture must enable the use of current technologies to assist with information management as well as an evolutionary transition from the Joint, Live, Virtual and Constructive (JLVC) Federation to a data-centric, web-based single digital environment that supports collaborative exercise planning and execution.

ABOUT DOD IAC PROGRAM

The DoD IAC program operates as a part of Defense Technical Information Center and provides technical data management and research

How to mandate agility in software development, operations, and data science

0 Comments

Even when leaders proclaim in their townhalls that your organization needs to be more agile and nimble, they can’t mandate it. Your CIO and IT leaders may standardize on practices, metrics, and responsibilities that they describe as agile methodology standards, but they can’t dictate that everyone adopts agile cultures and mindsets.

You can select agile tools, automate more with devops practices, and enable citizen data science programs, but you can’t force adoption and demand employee happiness. IT operations may operate a hybrid multicloud architecture, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that costs are optimized or that infrastructure can scale up and down auto-magically.

So, if you were looking to quickly standardize your agile processes, or to miraculously address technical debt by shifting to agile architectures, or to instantly transform into an agile way of working, then I am sorry to disappoint you. Agility doesn’t come free, cheap, or easily. You can’t manage it on a Gantt chart with fixed timelines.

And while I believe that agility is largely a bottom-up transformation, that doesn’t mean that developers, engineers, testers, scrum masters, and other IT team members can drive agility independently. The team must work collaboratively, acknowledge tradeoffs, and define agile operating principles where there is consensus on the benefits.

So if agility can’t be mandated and requires everyone’s contributions, how do organizations become more agile? In the spirit of agile methodologies, data-driven practices, and adopting a devops culture, here are some ways everyone in the IT organization can drive agility collaboratively.

Make the case for agile methodologies 

Chapter 2 of my book, Driving Digital, is all about going from basic scrum practices to a more comprehensive agile planning process that includes assigning roles and responsibilities, planning multi-sprint backlogs, and standardizing estimating practices. When I work with teams trying to adopt agile

Color Star Technology in Development of Offline Music Festival Series

0 Comments

NEW YORK, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. (Nasdaq CM: CSCW) (the “Company”, or “Color Star”), a company engaged in the businesses of providing online and offline paid knowledge services for the media, entertainment and culture industries globally, announced today that it plans to launch “Color World”-branded offline music festival series (the “Festival Series”), furthering the Company’s aspirations to build “Color World” into a leading entertainment-centric paid knowledge services platform which connects musicians, artists and celebrities with its growing bases of fans, followers and users. The Company is currently in discussion with multiple well-established music festival brands to co-organize up to 30 music festivals with different genres over the next five years in different cities across Asia and beyond.   

“As receding COVID-19 pandemic allows China and most Asian countries to gradually get back to normal, so will be the demand for outdoor music festivals in these countries. Music festivals have gained increasing popularity in China and other Asian countries in recent years, often attracting tens of thousands of participants who use it as social venues to enjoy not only live performances but also other attractions such as food, merchandise vending, and other social or cultural activities. The Festival Series, combined with our online offerings such as online concerts, courses, “star teacher”- fan meetings, and our soon-to-be launched online celebrity merchandise store, will add fuel to the fire for our already rapidly expanding user base,” said Luke Lu, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Color Star.

About Color Star Technology

Color Star Technology Co, Ltd. (Nasdaq CM: CSCW) offers online and offline paid knowledge services for media, entertainment and culture industries globally. Its business operations are conducted through its wholly-owned subsidiaries Color China Entertainment Ltd. and CACM Group NY, Inc. The Company’s online education is

Mouse immune study gives pointers for development of vaccines and immune therapies — ScienceDaily

0 Comments

Researchers have charted the activity of tens of thousands of genes in mouse immune cells over the course of an infection. The study from the University of Melbourne, Australia, the Wellcome Sanger Institute, and their collaborators created the first full dynamic map of how cells learn to fight microbes and then preserve a memory of this for future infections.

The findings, published in the journal Nature Immunology, could help scientists develop new vaccines and therapeutics for a range of diseases by guiding their research into a particular set of immune cells, known as CD4+ T cells, that are essential for generating immunity.

The international research team studied the CD4+ T cells during an experimental infection of mice with malaria-causing parasites, which invade and multiply inside red blood cells. With the aid of machine learning techniques, the research team combined the gene activity data over four weeks of infection to generate a comprehensive map of the developmental journeys taken by CD4+ T cells.

Dr Ashraful Haque, co-lead author from the University of Melbourne’s Doherty Institute, said: “We traced thousands of individual genes to generate a map from initial infection to periods when cells firstly ‘decide’ between various immune roles for fighting the infection, and secondly preserve memories of that encounter. Our map revealed several novel genes that were active — in particular, in a type of CD4+ T cells called T follicular helper cells. These are essential for making antibodies that protect against malaria but have not yet been well studied.”

The scientists have shared their data through a freely available digital resource. This map allows immunology researchers worldwide to track the response of individual genes after infection.

Dr Sarah Teichmann, co-lead author from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, said: “Importantly, while our map was generated using an experimental model of