Donald Trump administration imposes new curbs on H-1B visas to protect US workers, narrows ‘specialty occupation’ definition

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a man wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump administration imposes new curbs on H-1B visas to protect US workers, narrows ‘specialty occupation’ definition


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Donald Trump administration imposes new curbs on H-1B visas to protect US workers, narrows ‘specialty occupation’ definition

Washington: The Trump administration has announced new restrictions on H-1B nonimmigrant visa programme which it said is aimed at protecting American workers, restoring integrity and to better guarantee that H-1B petitions are approved only for qualified beneficiaries and petitioners, a move which is likely to affect thousands of Indian IT professionals.

The interim final rule announced by the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday, less than four weeks ahead of the US presidential election, will narrow the definition of “specialty occupation” as Congress intended by closing the overbroad definition that allowed companies to game the system.

It will also require companies to make “real” offers to “real employees,” by closing loopholes and preventing the displacement of the American workers. And finally, the new rules would enhance the department’s ability to enforce compliance through worksite inspections and monitor compliance before, during and after an H1-B petition is approved.

The H-1B visa is a non-immigrant visa that allows US companies to employ foreign workers in speciality occupations that require theoretical or technical expertise.

The technology companies depend on it to hire tens of thousands of employees each year from countries like India and China.

Such a decision by the Trump administration is likely to have an adverse impact on thousands of Indian IT professionals. Already a large number of Indians on the H-1B visas have lost their jobs and are headed back home during the coronavirus pandemic that has severely hit the US economy.

According to the Department of Homeland Security, the interim final rule to be published in Federal Register will be effective in 60 days.

According to the Department of Homeland Security, the US Citizenship and Immigration Services

President Donald Trump’s Twitter could be especially active during his quarantine for coronavirus

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The tweet quickly appeared to become his most shared ever, racking up more than 887,000 retweets and 1.6 million likes by late Friday afternoon, according to social media analytics company Tweet Binder and researchers.

“The fact that Donald Trump broke the info on Twitter indicates that this is his mode of choice for communicating with the American people about the most serious things,” said Samuel Woolley, a professor and director of a propaganda research team at the University of Texas at Austin.

Trump has one of the most popular Twitter accounts in the world, with 86.6 million followers. He uses the site to broadcast his thoughts on issues, promote his campaign for presidency and attack his critics. Even as Twitter invoked Trump’s rage earlier this year by slapping fact checks and labels on his tweets, Trump kept tweeting multiple times each day.

That’s unlikely to stop during his quarantine, especially if his symptoms remain mild, social media experts who follow his account say. It may even give him more time to tweet. Trump has been known to tweet more during times of rest or travel over the past few years, Woolley said.

“I bet that once he has his feet under him, assuming his case is relatively mild, he’s going to be tweeting more than ever,” said social media researcher and Clemson University professor Darren Linvill.

It’s not just the president. Shelter-in-place and quarantine restrictions this year have proven that people turn to social media more often when they’re stuck inside. In the early weeks of the pandemic, Twitter reported that its number of daily users increased 23 percent from the year before to 164 million people.

Other world leaders have already set an example for how to manage social media while battling the coronavirus this year. When British Prime