Tuna Value Dropping, Industry Must Plan Ahead: Report

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Tuna is holding steady as a $40 billion-a-year business, but commercial fisheries worldwide are hauling in bigger catches of dwindling value, threatening the long-term survival of some species, according to a new report.

“Fisheries caught 500,000 more metric tons in 2018 than in 2012, but were paid $500 million less in dock value,” study co-author Grantly Galland, an officer with The Pew Charitable Trusts’ international fisheries group, told AFP.

Unless governments that regulate the industry through regional management bodies adopt long-term strategies, everything from supermarket tuna to $100-a-portion sashimi could wind up in short supply, the report warned.

Crashing populations of skipjack, bigeye, yellowfin and bluefin would also jeopardise livelihoods and disrupt ecosystems in which the top-level predators play a critical role.

The world's top tuna fishing nations are Indonesia, which landed more than 550,000 tonnes in 2018, followed by Japan, Papua New Guinea, Taiwan, Spain, Ecuador and South Korea The world’s top tuna fishing nations are Indonesia, which landed more than 550,000 tonnes in 2018, followed by Japan, Papua New Guinea, Taiwan, Spain, Ecuador and South Korea Photo: AFP / HILARY HOSIA

Only a long-term, science-based approach, the report suggests, can keep revenue high without depleting stocks past the threshold of sustainability.

The new assessment pulls together global data — total catch, along with value from dock to diner table — for the seven main species of tuna found in the world’s oceans.

Skipjack, a staple of supermarket tuna, accounted for 58 percent of all tuna landed in 2018 by weight, and 40 percent of value at the final point of sale.

The three million tonnes harvested that year was 20 percent more than in 2012.

Historically, regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) have tended to ignore the advice of their own scientific committees Historically, regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) have tended to ignore the advice of their own scientific committees Photo: AFP / John SAEKI

But it ultimately only brought in only six percent more in sales.

Yellowfin — the second most important tuna species, both by total weight and revenue — saw a

A 24-year-old game developer for Roblox who makes over $1 million a year shares how he started his own company after dropping out of school

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a person smiling for the camera: Alex Hicks. Alex Hicks


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Alex Hicks. Alex Hicks

In 2010, Alex Hicks released his first video game on Roblox. Ten years later, he’s made more than $1 million a year as the owner of game development studio RedManta, which creates games for the popular kids platform and has since generated nearly one billion plays combined.

After several software engineering internships at Roblox, Hicks developed a solid understanding about game design, developer toolsets, and operations — a skill set that led him to quit college and develop games full time.

Now, he shares with Business Insider how embracing Roblox’s communities and focusing on efficiency helped him reach the million-dollar revenue mark in 2020.

“[A]t this point I’m feeling I’m much farther ahead than many of the people I know who graduated with game design degrees,” Hicks said. 

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