Facing an Outrageous Increase in App Traffic Due to COVID-19? Technology Fixes that Facilitate Scaling Up

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Scaling of Apps in COVID -19

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Let us be straightforward about it…

Until a vaccine is in place, it would be difficult to bat away the virus of COVID -19 completely. Until then, humans and businesses need to go about their businesses with resilience and positivity. Companies, especially, have to think about whether to scale up or scale down their operations.

As it turns out, if you are into food delivery, logistics, or online learning, without a doubt, scaling up your applications will be on the top of your mind, what with consumers thronging the online stores and apps in significant numbers for purchases, delivery requests and more. The increased demand has pushed applications to their limits and beyond, leading to outages and other such issues. In short, businesses out there are struggling to scale up their applications.

If your company is witnessing an unprecedented increase in business and application load, all that you can do is scale up your applications.

Now the question is: How to scale mobile app solutions the right way?

Before we answer that question, let’s first understand what scalability is?

As simple as it means, scalability is the app’s capacity to be flexible enough to take on the extra load. Read the e-book “Ultimate formula for building scalable web apps” to gather in-depth ideas on scalability.”

In terms of mobile app solutions, scalability could be considered in two senses:

  • Increasing customer base and the app’s ability to manage volume
  • Hardware infrastructure and code’s flexibility to hold up future innovation

Your app may be innovative and all, but if it is unable to adapt and grow, you will not be able to go to the next level. And, God forbid, if your app crashes, your sales will go downhill as you won’t be able to cater to tens of

NASA, SpaceX Delay Crew-1 Mission Due To ‘Off-Nominal Behavior’ From Falcon 9

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KEY POINTS

  • NASA and SpaceX’s crewed mission has been delayed to November
  • The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s engine
  • The delay can provide more time to ensure the mission’s safety

NASA and SpaceX’s Crew-1 has been delayed due to “off-nominal” behavior from the Falcon 9.

It was in May when NASA and SpaceX successfully launched astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station (ISS), marking the first time that American astronauts launched from American soil in nearly a decade. But that successful mission was just a demonstration and the first actual crewed operational flight of a Crew Dragon spacecraft, the Crew-1 mission, was set for a late October launch following several delays.

But on Oct. 1, NASA released a statement on the Crew-1 mission, noting a new target of “no sooner than early-to-mid November.” The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s first stage engine gas generators during a recent non-NASA mission.

Although the agency did not specify which mission this was, it was just last Oct. 2 when the Falcon 9 launch set to carry a GPS 3 satellite was scrubbed just two seconds before liftoff. An earlier Falcon 9 Starlink launch was also scrubbed with just seconds before liftoff although it was later successfully launched on Oct. 6, SpaceNews reports.

“NASA and SpaceX will use the data from the company’s hardware testing and reviews to ensure these critical missions are carried out with the highest level of safety,” the agency said in the statement.

Meanwhile, another launch set to use the Falcon 9, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich, is still scheduled for Nov. 10.

No matter when the launch will take place, NASA and SpaceX’s Crew-1 mission remains the same, with the plans to send NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover and

Science More Highly Valued by UK Due to COVID-19

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Science more highly valued by UK public due to COVID-19, but barriers to STEM education threaten future scientific development

BRACKNELL, UK / ACCESSWIRE / October 6, 2020 / Science and scientists have gained a renewed level of significance in the minds of the UK public due to COVID-19, according to new research released today from 3M, the science-based technology company.

In its 2020 State of Science Index (SOSI), conducted before and during the height of the pandemic, scepticism of science has declined amongst Britons for the first time in three years from 40 per cent pre-pandemic to 29 per cent today – representing one of the biggest declines of all countries surveyed in this annual global study.

As a result of COVID-19, three out of four (77 per cent) are now more likely to believe that science plays a critical role in solving public health crises and 92 per cent believe people’s actions should follow scientific advice to contain the virus.

This compares with just one in four (28 per cent) believing in, rather than being sceptical of, science information that comes from politicians, compared to 86 per cent who believe those working in scientific disciplines.

The findings also show that people in the UK are three times more likely to believe science information coming from regular news outlets (62 per cent) than from social media (18 per cent). This compares globally to 67 per cent and 27 per cent, respectively.

Pre-pandemic, just 15 per cent of Britons would stand up for science when debating its merits. However, since the advent of COVID-19, half (50 per cent) of the population would now be more likely to advocate for science, with three-quarters (75 per cent) now being more likely to feel that science needs more funding.

Britons are united in their

Science More Highly Valued by UK Due to COVID-19 – Press Release

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Science more highly valued by UK public due to COVID-19, but barriers to STEM education threaten future scientific development

BRACKNELL, UK / ACCESSWIRE / October 6, 2020 / Science and scientists have gained a renewed level of significance in the minds of the UK public due to COVID-19, according to new research released today from 3M, the science-based technology company.

In its 2020 State of Science Index (SOSI), conducted before and during the height of the pandemic, scepticism of science has declined amongst Britons for the first time in three years from 40 per cent pre-pandemic to 29 per cent today – representing one of the biggest declines of all countries surveyed in this annual global study.

As a result of COVID-19, three out of four (77 per cent) are now more likely to believe that science plays a critical role in solving public health crises and 92 per cent believe people’s actions should follow scientific advice to contain the virus.

This compares with just one in four (28 per cent) believing in, rather than being sceptical of, science information that comes from politicians, compared to 86 per cent who believe those working in scientific disciplines.

The findings also show that people in the UK are three times more likely to believe science information coming from regular news outlets (62 per cent) than from social media (18 per cent). This compares globally to 67 per cent and 27 per cent, respectively.

Pre-pandemic, just 15 per cent of Britons would stand up for science when debating its merits. However, since the advent of COVID-19, half (50 per cent) of the population would now be more likely to advocate for science, with three-quarters (75 per cent) now being more likely to feel that science needs more funding.

Britons are united in their

Tech investment surges to unprecedented levels due to COVID-19

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Global companies spent around $15 billion extra a week on technology during the pandemic’s first wave, Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO survey finds.

harvey-mudd-kpmg-survey.jpg

Image: Harvey Mudd/KPMG

Global IT leaders spent around $15 billion extra a week on technology to enable safe and secure home working during COVID-19, according to the 2020 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. This was one of the biggest surges in technology investment in history— with the world’s IT leaders spending an additional 5% more of their IT budget to deal with the COVID-19 crisis, the survey said.

The technology leadership survey of over 4,200 IT leaders analyzed responses from organizations with a combined technology spend of over $250 billion. It also found that despite this huge surge of spending and security and privacy being the top investment during COVID-19, four in 10 IT leaders report that their company has experienced more cyberattacks.

Over three-quarters of these attacks were from phishing (83%), and almost two-thirds from malware (62%), suggesting that the massive move to home working has increased exposure from employees, the survey noted.

SEE: 
Only 11% of organizations are using tech to ensure a safe return to the workplace

 (TechRepublic)

At the same time, organizations have struggled to find skilled cybersecurity professionals to support this dramatic shift to working from home—and 35% reported that cybersecurity is now the most “in demand” technology skill in the world. This is the first time a security-related skill has topped the list of global technology skills shortages for over a decade, according to the survey.

Although technology spend has risen dramatically during the pandemic, the survey found that technology budgets will be under more strain over the year ahead. Before COVID-19, over half (51%) of IT leaders expected a budget increase in the next 12 months, but during the pandemic this number declined