Employees To Get Permanent Work From Home Through Summer 2021

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KEY POINTS

  • 90% employees don’t want to a rigid office schedule: Dropbox’s internal survey
  • Employees can make their own schedules in the new ‘virtual first’ policy
  • Dropbox will set up collaboration spaces called ‘Dropbox Studios’ 

Cloud services company Dropbox is allowing its employees to work from home permanently, as part of its new ‘virtual first’ approach, it announced Tuesday in a blog post.

All employees of Dropbox have been working from home since March when the pandemic triggered lockdowns. This mandatory work-from-home policy has now been extended until June 2021. The change comes after an internal survey by the company suggested that nearly 90% of employees feel productive at home and don’t want to return to a rigid five-day in-office workweek.

Dropbox is the latest to join technology companies including Microsoft, Twitter, Slack, and Facebook to announce permanent work-from-home policies.

“Remote work will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work,” Dropbox said in the blog post.

With the coronavirus pandemic upsetting the conventional work culture around the world, Dropbox is using the opportunity to introduce changes to its internal working.

In the blog post, the company said it would be changing its current offices into flexible co-working spaces — Dropbox Studios — designed especially for collaboration rather than solo work. The utilization of the co-working spaces in San Francisco, Seattle and Austin, and Dublin in Ireland, will depend on the teams’ needs. More co-working spaces could be set up if they turn out to be successful.

The company is also introducing ‘non-linear workdays,’ allowing employees to make their own schedules between time zones beyond Dropbox’s core collaboration hours. Dropbox will also facilitate employees’ relocation to other cities where it has offices.

“As our workforce grows more distributed, this will help balance collaboration with

Cyber Warriors Sound Warning On Working From Home

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Cyber warriors on NATO’s eastern edge are warning that the growing number of people working from home globally due to the pandemic is increasing vulnerability to cyber attacks.

The Baltic state of Estonia hosts two cyber facilities for the Western military alliance — set up following a series of cyber attacks from neighbour Russia more than a decade ago.

“Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,” Jaak Tarien, head of NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (CCDCOE), told AFP in an interview.

The increased amount of information travelling between institutional servers and home networks is creating new challenges for employers.

'Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,' says Jaak Tarien, head of NATO's Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence ‘Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,’ says Jaak Tarien, head of NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence Photo: AFP / Raigo Pajula

“Tackling these new challenges is complicated and requires a lot of resources as well as a different kind of approach,” Tarien said.

“We are likely only scratching the surface in assessing the magnitude of malicious activities taking place in the Covid-era busy cyberspace.”

An EU-wide survey in September found that around a third of employees were working from home.

The NATO Cyber Range CR14 centre was set up after a series of cyber attacks on Estonian websites in 2007 The NATO Cyber Range CR14 centre was set up after a series of cyber attacks on Estonian websites in 2007 Photo: AFP / Raigo Pajula

The concerns are echoed at NATO’s Cyber Range — a heavily-guarded facility protected by barbed wire in the centre of the capital Tallinn run by Estonian defence forces.

The server rooms inside serve as a platform for NATO cyber security exercises and training.

“Specialists have set up the work infrastructure, but they cannot control the way people use their home internet or how secure it is,” said Mihkel Tikk, head of the Estonian defence ministry’s cyber policy department.

Tikk said the

Deadly Snake Captured From Home After Found Slithering Under Aquarium, Rescue Caught On Camera

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A deadly snake was captured after it was found under an aquarium inside a home in Australia earlier this month.

Jack Hogan with Snake Catcher Northern Rivers 24/7  arrived at the home after receiving information that a snake was seen slithering under the aquarium.

“We received a call for a greenish Snake that was seen slithering under this Bangalow residents’ Aquarium!” he wrote in a Facebook post.

However, Hogan was shocked after he stumbled upon the venomous Eastern Brown Snake while attempting to capture the reptile.

“I suspected the Snake to be a harmless Common Tree Snake as we see a lot of them in the area. After poking around with my hands and waiving my big head around for a while I stumbled upon this gorgeous Eastern Brown Snake all curled up behind the stereo!!” he wrote in the post.

Video of the rescue showed the snake catcher moving the furniture and capturing the reptile, which is seen hiding behind the stereo, using tongs. He then holds the deadly snake with his bare hands and places it inside a black bag.

The reptile was then released into the wild.

Meanwhile, Facebook users took to the comments section to appreciate the snake catcher for his “great work.”

In a similar incident earlier this month, an Eastern Brown Snake, “three times bigger” than normal, was caught at an Australian aged care facility. The reptile, which was almost 6 feet in length and weighed close to 4 pounds, was caught by snake catcher Gavin Smith.

“I haven’t caught a snake quite like that before … it was a whopping snake. I’d say it was three times heavier and bigger and stronger than your average eastern brown snake. From my perspective, that’s one of the biggest species found around here and I doubt

Dropbox is letting all employees work from home permanently

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  • Dropbox just announced it would allow all employees to work from home permanently. 
  • The company initially ordered staff to work from home in March, during the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in the US.
  • The company plans to convert its existing offices to coworking spaces to aid in team building and collaboration.
  • Twitter and Atlassian have also allowed all employees to permanently work from home.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Dropbox is going remote — permanently. 

The cloud-storage company announced Tuesday it would allow all employees to work from home going forward. The shift comes after an internal survey found nearly 90% of Dropbox workers said they were more productive at home.

“Starting today, Dropbox is becoming a Virtual First company,” the company said in a blog post. “Remote work (outside an office) will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work.”

Dropbox initially ordered employees to work from home to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in March.

The company will convert its existing real estate into flexible coworking spaces called Dropbox Studios, where employees can choose to go in to work. These spaces are primarily for team building and collaboration, not for “solo work.”

Dropbox has offices in San Francisco, Seattle, Dublin, and Austin, Texas, but said it may build more flexible studios in other areas.

The company will also allow for greater employee relocation outside cities where there are offices. To help employees in different time zones work together, the company will allow each worker to decide their own work hours. 

Dropbox joins Twitter and Atlassian as major firms that have allowed all employees to permanently work from home. Others, like Microsoft and Facebook, said a portion of their workforce would be remote forever. 

Dropbox did not immediately respond to Business

Houston will be home to the nation’s largest psychiatric hospital in 2021

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The UTHealth Behavioral Sciences Center will be making history in Houston.

The facility will be the first public mental health hospital constructed in more than three decades, and will be the largest of its kind in the United States.

UTHEALTH MAKING WAVES IN RESEARCH: UT Health Science Center shows off new high-tech teaching facility

UTHealth enlisted the help of architecture firm Perkins and Will to design the mental health facility near the Texas Medical Center.

The future building will “consist of two buildings connected by a glazed bridge, surrounded by a tranquil green space,” as reported by Jillian Goltzman at Innovation Map.


The facility will be an educational hospital, where future physicians and specialists will be trained. Not only will the facility provide mental healthcare, but substance use intervention, treatment and medical care via integrated treatment programs, according to Innovation Map.

The infrastructure of the new building is being carefully crafted to assist with patient care. Light and sound were both important considerations in the development of the building.

The ultimate goal is to create a “peaceful environment for patients and staff.” The facility will have tunable light fixtures that adjust to the time of day, as well as noise reduction coefficient acoustics to reduce noise impact.

To help transition patients back into everyday life, the facility will include a therapy mall, that “can serve as a salon, boutique, fitness center, movie night spot, or music therapy space.”

The UTHealth Behavioral Sciences Center will be opening its doors in late 2021, and will include 264 inpatient beds.

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