The cybersecurity skills gap: California educates the workforce of the future

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California is a beacon for global innovation, home of Silicon Valley and a center for space tech. Its economy outpaces many nations, beating both the Russian Federation and Italy for gross domestic product. Big name enterprise players, the U.S. military, and government all vie for top talent; and there isn’t enough to go around.

“There’s over 37,000 vacancies that we know of in California just alone in cybersecurity,” said Stewart Knox (pictured), undersecretary at the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency.

And demand is forecast to grow. As aerospace innovators break business free of the confines of gravity, the need to secure satellites and space-based operations is going to boom.

Knox spoke with John Furrier, host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s livestreaming studio, during the Space & Cybersecurity Symposium. They discussed how California is addressing the skills gap in cybersecurity. (* Disclosure below.)

The right age to begin technology training

Making sure California has a diverse, skilled workforce ready to fill industry demand is the job of the California Labor and Workforce Development Agency.

“We want to take people from that point in time where they sit today and try to give them that exposure … to a system for which there are jobs that pay well with benefit packages with companies that care about their employees,” Knox stated.

Prepping a workforce with future skills starts with technological training. What’s the right age for technology training to begin? Kindergarten, according to Knox. Courses ideally would continue seamlessly through 12th grade and beyond.

“It’s also looking at how the community college system links to [K through 12], and then the university system links above and beyond,” Knox said.

This continuum of tech exposure allows students to explore different areas and discover where their talents lie. It could also reduce the

Vernier Software & Technology Launches a New Sensor to Support the Development of STEM Skills and Environmental Literacy | News

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BEAVERTON, Ore., Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Vernier recently launched the new Go Direct® Weather System to engage students in hands-on data collection as they learn important environmental science concepts. This affordable wireless sensor can be used in the classroom or out in the field to help middle school, high school, and college-level students investigate and analyze a variety of environmental factors.

“This new sensor for environmental science provides an affordable way for STEM educators to engage their students in data collection as they explore the science of natural phenomena,” said John Wheeler, CEO of Vernier Software & Technology. “The Go Direct Weather System is notable because students can collect and analyze multiple types of environmental data using just one compact system.”

The two-part Go Direct Weather System consists of the Go Direct Weather sensor and the Go Direct Weather Vane. The handheld weather sensor is used to collect data around ambient temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind chill, dew point, barometric pressure, and more. The weather vane accessory is used in conjunction with the sensor to capture wind direction data.

The Go Direct Weather System features a rechargeable battery that offers a long life and provides always-ready operation when students are using the sensor wirelessly. Instructor information and student instructions for select experiments utilizing the system are also available to educators as a free download.

The Go Direct Weather System connects directly to any mobile device, Chromebook, or computer using the new Vernier Graphical Analysis Pro or the free Vernier Graphical Analysis app. This sensor can be used wired via USB or wirelessly via Bluetooth® wireless technology, which provides educators the opportunity to choose the best solution for their classroom or outdoors.

To learn more, visit www.vernier.com/go-direct-weather-system/.

About Vernier Software &

Vernier Software & Technology Launches a New Sensor to Support the Development of STEM Skills and Environmental Literacy

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BEAVERTON, Ore., Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Vernier recently launched the new Go Direct® Weather System to engage students in hands-on data collection as they learn important environmental science concepts. This affordable wireless sensor can be used in the classroom or out in the field to help middle school, high school, and college-level students investigate and analyze a variety of environmental factors.

“This new sensor for environmental science provides an affordable way for STEM educators to engage their students in data collection as they explore the science of natural phenomena,” said John Wheeler, CEO of Vernier Software & Technology. “The Go Direct Weather System is notable because students can collect and analyze multiple types of environmental data using just one compact system.”

The two-part Go Direct Weather System consists of the Go Direct Weather sensor and the Go Direct Weather Vane. The handheld weather sensor is used to collect data around ambient temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind chill, dew point, barometric pressure, and more. The weather vane accessory is used in conjunction with the sensor to capture wind direction data.

The Go Direct Weather System features a rechargeable battery that offers a long life and provides always-ready operation when students are using the sensor wirelessly. Instructor information and student instructions for select experiments utilizing the system are also available to educators as a free download.

The Go Direct Weather System connects directly to any mobile device, Chromebook, or computer using the new Vernier Graphical Analysis Pro or the free Vernier Graphical Analysis app. This sensor can be used wired via USB or wirelessly via Bluetooth® wireless technology, which provides educators the opportunity to choose the best solution for their classroom or outdoors.

To learn more, visit www.vernier.com/go-direct-weather-system/.

About Vernier Software &

Nutanix University Launches Next Generation of Certifications to Enable Skills in Hybrid Cloud Technology

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Industry-Recognized Certification and Training Program Now Includes More Skill Levels and Market-Relevant Technology Tracks for IT Professionals

Nutanix (NASDAQ: NTNX), a leader in enterprise cloud computing, today announced the launch of its extended multi-level Nutanix Certification Program, designed to enable the skills and knowledge needed to successfully implement, manage, optimize, and scale Nutanix multi-product software. The new program provides certifications across four skill levels and six new technology tracks to better meet participants’ current and future career goals.

In addition to the three current skill levels of Nutanix certifications – Professional (NCP), Master (NCM), and Expert (NPX) – the expanded offering will now include an “Associate” certification (NCA), a foundational program for building a career in multicloud technology. Nutanix is also releasing a new training course to help participants prepare for the NCA certification exam, titled Nutanix Hybrid Cloud Fundamentals. The course will cover the products, capabilities, and technologies that form the foundation of Nutanix’s Hybrid Cloud solution.

Nutanix’s new training and certification tracks extend beyond AOS and hyperconverged infrastructure and will cover a vast array of new skills. Consistent with Nutanix’s overall product direction, its new training and certification program focuses on four key areas:

  • Digital HCI Services (Multicloud Infrastructure)

  • Data Center Services (Data Storage Services, Security & Governance, Business Continuity)

  • DevOps Services (Multicloud Automation, Database Automation)

  • Desktop Services (End User Computing)

These tracks will be rolled out over the next several months.

“With this Nutanix University offering, participants will have access to a larger collection of technical certifications to prepare them for the future,” said Inder Sidhu, Executive Vice President of Global Customer Success at Nutanix. “Our carefully extended program boasts new customization options, so customers and partners can build a professional development plan that best fits their career journey. We’re excited to offer these certifications and training

Hire Purpose: How Smart Companies Can Close the Skills Gap by Deanna Mulligan

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Hire Purpose: How Smart Companies Can Close the Skills Gap

Deanna Mulligan

280 pages, Columbia Business School Publishing, 2020

Buy the book »

Tech companies and their customers report that the coronavirus crisis has significantly accelerated digital transformations across the public and private sectors. Remote work, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence are gaining usage at lightning speed. This means the urgency of re-skilling and upskilling the workforce has also intensified. That challenge is complex. In her new book, Hire Purpose: How Smart Companies Can Close the Skills Gap, Guardian Life Insurance CEO Deanna Mulligan explains how even her industry’s ancient practice of actuarial science has had to retrain using next-generation skills, and how society must now do the same.—Deanna Mulligan

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Early in my tenure as CEO, I asked our team at Guardian to become experts in the future of work and how workers can acquire the necessary skills to succeed. We want our people and our policyholders alike to be high achievers for current jobs and for long-term career opportunities. We also want to meet the needs of local economies and society.

Toward these ends, we chose to invest significantly in better understanding two areas in the field of workforce development: bridging the skills gap and preparing for digital convergence.  On the skills front, people need communications and collaboration skills as well as a baseline of technology skills. On the digital convergence side, they need to unify technology and business planning. They need to be data savvy.

Nowhere is that more poignant than among our own actuaries, the professionals who calculate insurance and annuity premiums, reserves, and dividends. Manufacturers have engineers, hospitals have doctors, and law firms have attorneys. Those who surround and support them are essential, but they are at the core of the business. Insurance companies