A study detailing the processes that control mole size may help scientists find new ways to prevent skin cancer from growing — ScienceDaily

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Moles stop growing when they reach a certain size due to normal interactions between cells, despite having cancer-associated gene mutations, says a new study published today in eLife.

The findings in mice could help scientists develop new ways to prevent skin cancer growth that take advantage of the normal mechanisms that control cell growth in the body.

Mutations that activate the protein made by the BRAF gene are believed to contribute to the development of skin cancer. However, recent studies have shown that these mutations do not often cause skin cancer, but instead result in the formation of completely harmless pigmented moles on the skin. In fact, 90% of moles have these cancer-linked mutations but never go on to form tumours. “Exploring why moles stop growing might lead us to a better understanding of what goes wrong in skin cancer,” says lead author Roland Ruiz-Vega, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Irvine, US.

Scientists believe that stress caused by rapid cell growth may stop the growth of moles through a process called oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), but this has not been proven. To test the idea, Ruiz-Vega and colleagues studied mice with BRAF mutations that develop numerous moles.

The team first focused on assessing ‘senescence’, a set of changes in cells usually associated with aging. Using a technique called single-cell RNA sequencing to compare mole cells with normal skin cells, they found that moles are growth-arrested, but no more senescent than normal skin cells. The cells also did not have any apparent differences in gene expression (where a gene is activated to create a necessary protein) that would support the idea of OIS controlling their growth.

Additionally, computer modelling of mole growth did not support the idea of OIS. In fact, the models suggested that mole cells communicate

New Technology Allows Circuits To Be Printed Directly On The Skin

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Sensors printed directly on the skin have been inching closer to commercial reality in recent years. The dream of highly sensitive sensors could have a wide array of applications, from robotics to medicine, but the field has been limited by its method of circuit printing. Currently, printing circuits directly on the skin requires a lot of heat – something the skin isn’t generally fond of.

Now, researchers believe they may have solved this problem. A team from Penn State University have developed a method of fabricating high-performance circuitry directly on skin without heat, according to a study published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

While flexible sensors already exist and have applications in future physiological monitoring, applying that technology to the skin has remained an issue for scientists. If this process is viable on a large scale, it may pave the way for the technology to help patients with various conditions. 

Traditional methods of bonding the components within a sensor, called sintering, require temperatures of around 572°F (300°C), which renders the process incompatible with skin applications. 

“The skin surface cannot withstand such a high temperature, obviously,” Huanyu “Larry” Cheng, a Dorothy Quiggle Career Development professor in the Penn State Department, said in a statement. “To get around this limitation, we proposed a sintering aid layer – something that would not hurt the skin and could help the material sinter together at a lower temperature.”

The new layer is made of calcium carbonate and an alcohol paste commonly found in peelable face masks. By applying the layer before sintering, the surface becomes smoother and the materials can bond without extreme heat. Even better, the materials used are recyclable and can be removed with just hot water.

“It could be recycled, since removal doesn’t damage the device,” Cheng said. “And, importantly, removal

Coty Expands Kylie Skin Brand to Europe and Australia

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Coty Inc.  (COTY) – Get Report said on Thursday that it was expanding its division for Kylie Jenner’s skincare products, Kylie Skin, to France, Germany, the U.K. and Australia.

The direct-to-consumer Kylieskin.com websites will ensure faster delivery of products. They’ll also enable customers to shop using their local languages and currencies, avoiding additional customs fees and duties, the New York beauty-products company said in a statement.

At last check Coty shares jumped 8% to $3.60.

“The launch of the Kylie Skin international websites also reinforces Coty’s strategic commitment to strengthening the direct-to-consumer business model,” said Simona Cattaneo, president of luxury brands at Coty. “We continue to see collections sell out quickly.” 

“I always wanted to bring my skincare line to more consumers around the world and this will allow for an easier shopping experience and faster delivery,” Jenner, a fashion designer and entrepreneur with a big social-media following, said in the company statement.

Initial product assortment for the direct-to-consumer websites in both Europe and Australia will include Coconut Body Scrub, Vanilla Milk Toner, Walnut Face Scrub, Hydrating Face Mask, and more.

“All products are cruelty-free, vegan, gluten free, paraben and sulfate free and suitable for all skin types,” Coty said.

Kylie Skin launched in 2019 in the U.S. Jenner started up Kylie Cosmetics in 2015.

In July, Coty shares rose after the company named beauty industry veteran Sue Nabi chief executive. 

Nabi’s appointment at the time placed the number of women CEOs in the S&P 500 at 28, or just 6% of the broadest benchmark of U.S.-listed companies.

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Teledyne DALSA’s thermal imaging camera plays pivotal role in Nuvoola’s AI-powered elevated skin temperature screening solution

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Nuvoola’s Luke AI Health Screening and Protection solution

Teledyne DALSA's Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution

WATERLOO, Ontario, Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Teledyne DALSA, a Teledyne Technologies [NYSE:TDY] company, and global leader in digital imaging technology, is pleased to provide its new Calibir GXF thermal camera as a critical component within Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution.

The new Calibir GXF model is optimized for elevated skin temperature detection with measurement accuracy and thermal stability better than +/-0.3°C with an external reference (as recommended by IEC80601-2-59). Like Calibir GXM models, the new GXF camera is NDAA, Section 889 compliant with IEC 80601-2-59-2017 certification pending.

Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution is unique in using their artificial intelligence platform to screen employees, suppliers, customers and visitors in just a few seconds. The solution, which benefits from the power of Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir™ infrared camera, includes an app that employees use to assess their health status before arriving at work, in addition to an onsite, touchless kiosk (using natural language interactions in English or French) that rapidly screens people for symptoms of COVID-19 as they enter buildings. It also includes analytics and predictive insights capabilities, meaning that it can alert on trends or changes in someone’s condition.

“We believe our system is a great way for companies to protect their employees. The threat of shut down due to employees spreading COVID-19 is real and will continue for some time,” said Martin Renière, President of Nuvoola. “Our expertise in computer vision, natural language processing and speech recognition provide our LUKE AI kiosk with the ability to automate and reinforce

Planaria flatworms can be alternative screening tool to avoid rabbit skin testing — ScienceDaily

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Tests for skin treatments could be screened using flatworms rather than other animals such as rabbits, according to new research.

A team at the University of Reading and Newcastle University have found that planaria, a type of flatworm, can be used as a reliable alternative for testing topical skin products used to treat human tissues such as the eyes, nose or vagina to ensure that they are not harmful.

The paper, published in Toxicology in Vitro, shows how the use of a fluorescent dye mixed with a potential skin product is absorbed through the outer layers of skin in the planaria.

The tests are cheaper and more ethical than existing animal tests, because planaria are readily available and easily cultured in a laboratory — and don’t experience suffering. While other tests are carried out on human skin cells in a petri dish, the new screening method would provide a more accurate test of how the potential skin product would interact with living tissue.

Professor Vitaliy Khutoryanskiy, a Professor of Formulation Science at the University of Reading said:

“Developing more ethical alternatives to tests that others do on rabbits, known as the Draize test, has been a major challenge, especially in relation to evaluating products for sensitive human tissue. Our tests with flatworms show that there are potential ways to screen skin irritants in a more ethically responsible way.

“While the vast majority of cosmetic skin products are no longer tested on animals, it remains critical that new developments for clinical treatments are tested robustly and we hope that we can find solutions that consign the Draize test to history. We also hope to continue planaria research and develop further tests for probe irritation potential of chemicals to other human tissues.”

A series of tests with the flatworms looked at