Twitter slaps warning on President Trump tweet claiming coronavirus immunity

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US President Trump has become subject to another fact-check warning on social media after claiming immunity to COVID-19.

In a tweet posted on Sunday, the US president claimed that physicians at the White House have given him a clean bill of health, and as a result, he is now “immune” to further infection by the novel coronavirus. 

Trump also claimed he is no longer contagious. 

See also: Twitter places public interest notice on President Trump’s tweet

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday,” the tweet reads. “That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!”

After the message was published, Twitter slapped a warning label on the tweet. The microblogging platform says the tweet “violated the Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19.”

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There are currently no concrete indicators that immunity from COVID-19 is assured following infection, and if resistance is built up due to the production of antibodies, it is not possible to know if an immune response is strong enough to fight off another case of the respiratory illness. 

In a statement on Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley said that Trump was no longer considered a “transmission risk to others,” but did not disclose if the president is now testing negative.

CNET: Huawei ban timeline: UK says there’s ‘clear evidence of collusion’ between Huawei and China

While Twitter may wipe out such messages and remove profiles entirely if they are spreading fake content surrounding the pandemic, as Trump is a significant political figure, the organization has chosen to keep the tweet accessible in the public interest. 

This is not the first time the US president has fallen afoul of Twitter’s rules. In May, a tweet posted by the US president was

US slaps trade restrictions on China’s top chipmaker

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The US didn’t waste much time blocking sales to China’s largest chipmaker. According to Reuters and the Wall Street Journal, the Commerce Department has added Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) to its entity list, effectively blocking interactions between US suppliers and the Chinese firm. The American companies will need to obtain individual export licenses to do business with SMIC, and those are expected to be rare.

The Commerce Department instituted the de facto trade ban over claims SMIC technology could be used for Chinese military purposes. A US defense contractor, SOS International, claimed SMIC had worked with both one of China’s largest defense firms and that university researchers linked to the military were designing projects based on SMIC technology.

The Department didn’t directly comment on SMIC, but told Reuters it was “constantly monitoring and assessing” possible threats to US security and foreign policy.

SMIC, meanwhile, appeared to have been caught by surprise. A spokesperson said the chip giant hadn’t received any official word of restrictions and reiterated denials of any military link. The company offers chips and services “solely for civilian and commercial end-users and end-uses,” according to the representative.

The semiconductor producer is just the second top-tier company added to the entity list after Huawei. While the effect of the ban won’t be clear until the Commerce Department decides who (if anyone) gets a license, it could represent a significant blow to Chinese tech as a whole. SMIC may have to turn to non-US technology whenever it wants to upgrade its manufacturing or maintain hardware, and there’s no guarantee it will find what it needs. It could find itself trailing behind rivals that have access to a wider range of equipment.

This could have a knock-on effect for companies that depend on SMIC. Huawei needs SMIC to make