Spellbreak Update 1.1 Fixes Bugs, Adds Anti-Cheat Measures, And Smooths Out Aiming Issues

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Spellbreak, a free-to-play battle royale where every player has an elemental power to fight with, has received its first major update. The game, which launched on PC, Switch, PS4, and Xbox One on September 3, has updated to version 1.1, and has fixed numerous bugs and issues in the process.

Update 1.1 brings several fixes to Spellbreak across all platforms, as well as some system-specific changes for each different version of the game. It doesn’t add any major new features, but instead focuses on tweaking and improving what is already there.

“We wanted the focus of this one to be on stability and performance across all of our platforms,” the Spellbreak blog reads before detailing the patch notes.

The complete patch notes for Spellbreak Update 1.1 are below.

Gameplay

  • The Lighting Bolts spell’s recovery animation can now be interrupted by casting a sorcery.
  • Fix edge case where reviving or exiling someone could be canceled in order to get faster spell firing.
  • Fixed an issue that caused projectiles to sometimes not register damage even though they hit.

Aim Assist

  • Smoothed out difference in aim assist strength between different framerates.
    • This results in more consistent behavior for all players and eliminates advantages that came from very high framerate.
  • Fixed an exploit where aim assist could be much stronger than intended under certain combinations of distance to target and input sensitivity.
    • This meant it was possible for players under certain circumstances to make their spells incredibly easy to hit. This was mostly clearly seen with the Lightning Gauntlet on PC.
  • Adjusted aim assist values for various console platforms.
  • Aim assist now decreases over distance.
  • Default Look Deadzone setting on Switch is now 0%.
    • This is generally what you want, because deadzones are handled by the OS itself.

Miscellaneous

  • Enabled some extra anti-cheat mechanisms.

Thinkware’s Tough M1 Action Camera System Smooths Out Your Motorcycle Ride Videos

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I reviewed a lot of dash cameras this summer and it was time to try something a little bit different: a dash cam for my motorcycle. The first one to arrive was the Thinkware M1 Motorsports Cam system. This system features two high definition video cameras in basically nuclear explosion-proof cases, a central control box with a built-in GPS antenna, and a wired remote control that goes on your handlebars. The system works just like a dash cam system in a car in that it is always recording once you start up your bike, but the remote control system lets you record longer sections of video if you want to capture a longer ride or a specific incident that happens in front of you. It also features electronic image stabilization and a decent app for setup and retrieving files recorded on the micro SD card.

It took about half an hour to install the $349 Thinkware M1 system on my Honda sport motorcycle. The camera modules were actually larger than I expected and that precluded me from installing them under the chin of the bike’s fairing, as a big hit on the front wheel would have sent the front fender into the camera.

So instead I installed the front camera just on the left side of my faring as you can see in the photos. I installed the rear camera under my tail light. Installation is made simple with plug and play wiring and mounts that use very strong adhesive