Apple Stops Selling Bose, Sonos And Logitech Headphones In Its Retail Stores

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KEY POINTS

  • Third-party products were taken off shelves in Apple stores
  • Apple had pulled Bowers & Wilkins, Band & Olufsen audio gear from its stores
  • Apple is expanding its audio strategy with new over-ear headphones

Ahead of new launches in its own audio category, Apple quietly removed headphones and other wireless speakers from third-party makers like Bose, Sonos and Logitech from its retail stores, Bloomberg reported Monday.

The iPhone maker has sold products of its rivals for a long time, but their audio gear was pulled from the website at the end of last month, the report said. Apple’s retail store employees were also asked to remove these products from the shelves.

Following this news, shares of Sonos fell as much as 7 percent in extended trading, and Bose and Logitech confirmed to Bloomberg that Apple will no longer sell their products. This move will be a big blow to Bose, as it depended on Apple to sell its products in shopping malls around the world. Logitech continues to sell other tech accessories in Apple stores, like keyboards and cameras.

Apple did not comment on this development.

The company pulled products of Bowers & Wilkins audio devices in 2016 and Band & Olufsen was taken off the shelves earlier this year.

This is not the first time that the company has rebuffed rivals’ products from its store. In 2014, it stopped selling Fitbit gear after announcing the launch of Apple Watch. Apple had stopped carrying Bose for a brief period in 2014 when the latter sued Beats, an Apple-owned company, for patent infringement.

The Verge reported that Apple may hold a hardware event later this month. The company has been working on over-ear headphones, including fitness-oriented models. The widely anticipated AirPods Pro and AirPods Studio headphones could have noise cancellation

After Math: Sonos sues Google again while Facebook keeps cleaning house

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The COVID lockdowns have hit the American auto industry hard this year with demand dropping as people stayed home and off the road. However, that apparently is not the case with Tesla which announced last week it had crushed its previous quarterly delivery record by nearly 27,000 vehicles. Over all, the company has shipped some 318,000 automobiles so far in 2020.

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Sonos Files Second Lawsuit Against Google Over Patent Infringement

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Sonos filed yet another lawsuit against Google on Tuesday, alleging the tech giant copied more of its innovations, specifically for Google’s smart speakers. 

The lawsuit alleges that Google infringed on five of Sonos’ patents including the ability to transfer the playback of music to the speaker from your phone, to manage different rooms of music around the home. 

Specifically, the lawsuit points to Google’s Chromecast Audio Adapter and its multi-room support. 

Sonos Speaker Logo

“Google has chosen to double down on its disregard for IP [intellectual property] and smaller American inventors and we believe it is vitally important that Sonos, both for its own sake and for that of other smaller innovative companies, stand up to monopolists who try to copy and subsidize their way to further domination,” a Sonos spokesperson said in a statement. 

Sonos said it has filed another lawsuit because Google continues to disregard its IP.

Digital Trends reached out to Google to comment on the lawsuit. We will update this story when we hear back.

It’s the second time Sonos has filed a lawsuit against Google over patent infringement. In January, the tech company sued Google under similar allegations. Sonos claimed that during the time it originally partnered with Google to enable its music service and its voice assistant on Sonos’ devices and software platform, Google turned around and used Sonos patents involving the setup, control, playback, and synchronization of wireless playback devices. 

Then, in June, Google countersued Sonos, alleging that the whole-house audio company infringed on five different Google patents. These patents include mesh networking, echo cancellation, DRM, content notifications, and personalized search.

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Sonos sues Google for infringing five more wireless audio patents

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Sonos has filed another patent lawsuit against Google, alleging that the search giant is infringing five wireless audio patents across the entire line of Nest and Chromecast products. The move comes on the eve of Google’s fall hardware event on September 30th, where it is expected to announce a new Chromecast and Nest smart speaker alongside new Pixel phones.

Sonos filed its first patent lawsuits against Google in January in California federal court and with the International Trade Commission; the federal case has been put on hold while the ITC reaches a decision on whether to block Google’s allegedly infringing products from market. The new case is filed only in the federal court for the Western District of Texas — an emerging patent lawsuit hotspot — and represents a more aggressive approach from Sonos.

“We think it’s important to show the depth and breadth of Google’s copying,” says Eddie Lazarus, Sonos’ chief legal officer. “We showed them claim charts on 100 patents that we claimed they were infringing, all to no avail.”

Google, of course, says it will fight back; it has countersued Sonos in the initial case. “Sonos has made misleading statements about our history of working together,” says Google spokesperson Jose Castaneda. “Our technology and devices were designed independently. We deny their claims vigorously, and will be defending against them.”

Sonos has long been vocal about the power of big platform companies like Google to push around smaller companies. In particular, Sonos alleges the tech giants routinely copy technology because the penalties are so low compared to the benefits of flooding the market with cheap loss-leader products and gaining market share. CEO Patrick Spence testified to the House antitrust subcommittee earlier this year about what’s called “efficient infringement” — and this new case is a reflection of how