Superconductor technology for smaller, sooner fusion

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Superconductor technology for smaller, sooner fusion
The assembly designed for the third SULTAN cable test features two 3-meter VIPER HTS cables in parallel and connected with a copper joint at the bottom; cryogenic helium and electrical current are injected at the top.once installed in SULTAN. The outer superstructure provides structural support to react the enormous lateral electromechanical body loads generated within the cables during testing. A unique aspect of this design, provided by the materials and the trapezoidal extension at the mid-plane, is the ability to axial strain the cables during testing to better replicate the conditions that would be experienced by VIPER cableswithin a high-field magnet. Credit: Jose Estrada/PSFC

Scientists have long sought to harness fusion as an inexhaustible and carbon-free energy source. Within the past few years, groundbreaking high-temperature superconductor technology (HTS) sparked a new vision for achieving practical fusion energy. This approach, known as the high-field pathway to fusion, aims to generate fusion in compact devices on a shorter timescale and lower cost than alternative approaches.


A key technical challenge to realizing this vision, though, has been getting HTS superconductors to work in an integrated way in the development of new, high-performance superconducting magnets, which will enable higher magnetic fields than previous generations of magnets, and are central to confining and controlling plasma reactions.

Now a team led by MIT’s Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) and MIT spinout company Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS), has developed and extensively tested an HTS cable technology that can be scaled and engineered into the high-performance magnets. The team’s research was published on Oct. 7 in Superconductor Science and Technology. Researchers included MIT assistant professor and principal investigator Zachary Hartwig; PSFC Deputy Head of Engineering Rui F. Vieira and other key PSFC technical and engineering staff; CFS Chief Science Officer Brandon Sorbom Ph.D. ’17 and other

States that reopened sooner, such as Texas, Arizona and Florida, experienced summer surges, report says — ScienceDaily

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For every two deaths attributed to COVID-19 in the U.S., a third American dies as a result of the pandemic, according to new data publishing Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study, led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University, shows that deaths between March 1 and Aug. 1 increased 20% compared to previous years — maybe not surprising in a pandemic. But deaths attributed to COVID-19 only accounted for 67% of those deaths.

“Contrary to skeptics who claim that COVID-19 deaths are fake or that the numbers are much smaller than we hear on the news, our research and many other studies on the same subject show quite the opposite,” said lead author Steven Woolf, M.D., director emeritus of VCU’s Center on Society and Health.

The study also contains suggestive evidence that state policies on reopening early in April and May may have fueled the surges experienced in June and July.

“The high death counts in Sun Belt states show us the grave consequences of how some states responded to the pandemic and sound the alarm not to repeat this mistake going forward,” said Woolf, a professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Population Health at the VCU School of Medicine.

Total death counts in the U.S. are remarkably consistent from year to year, as the study notes. The study authors pulled data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 2014 to 2020, using regression models to predict expected deaths for 2020.

The gap between reported COVID-19 deaths and all unexpected deaths can be partially explained by delays in reporting COVID-19 deaths, miscoding or other data limitations, Woolf said. But the pandemic’s other ripple effects could explain more.

“Some people who never had the virus may have died because of disruptions caused

When Is The Next Solar And Lunar Eclipse? They’re Sooner Than You Think

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Eclipses are perhaps the most spectacular celestial events of all.

During a lunar eclipse the full moon contain a luscious copper colour for a few hours, while solar eclipses—which can last just a few minutes—often leave onlookers scarred for life. In a good way! In fact, if you’ve ever witnessed a brief totality during a total solar eclipse when the world around you turns into twilight while you get to gawp at the Sun’s precious outer atmosphere—its bright white corona—you’ll know why there are thousands of dedicated eclipse chases who try to see as many as they can.

Trouble is, solar and lunar eclipse is don’t come around very often.

However, there are now a few coming up fast.

MORE FROM FORBESCorona Vs Corona: It’s 100 Days Until The Rare Eclipse Coronavirus Is Named After. Will You See It?

In 2020 there are six eclipses; four lunar eclipses and two solar eclipses. We’re almost through with them, having already had lunar eclipses on:

There was also a solar eclipse—a rare kind called an annular or “ring of fire” eclipse:

So what’s left in 2020? One lunar eclipse—this one the best one of the year for North Americans—and a rare total solar eclipse, the best of them all, which will be seen only from South America.

Sadly, COVID-19 is playing havoc with that one.

Here’s everything you need to know about the next solar and lunar eclipses coming up, and the next eclipses of all kinds visible to North America.

When is the next lunar eclipse?

Date: Monday,

5 Reasons the Apple Search Engine Could Happen Sooner or Later

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Around 9 months ago, Facebook officially introduced its new social search engine to the public. With that announcement, now 4 tech juggernauts already have their own search engines. Google with its widely-popular “Google”, Microsoft with “Bing”, Yahoo with “Yahoo!” and last but not least, Facebook with its newly-announced “Graph Search”.

But what about Apple, the company that in the fiscal year of 2012 made more profits than even Google, Microsoft, Yahoo and Facebook combined? Does this Cupertino-based tech giant have any plan to follow Facebook’s footsteps to launch its own search engine in the near future?

How the Rumors Started?

Actually, the rumors about Apple’s search engine have become old news in tech world. As a matter of fact, many famous tech news portals from TechCrunch, Mashable and other sites, including analyst Gene Munster believed that Apple’s own search engine was in the making and would replace Google Search on iOS. Meanwhile, the writers at Forbes were also really vocal regarding this issue.

The sign of Apple removing Google Search from iOS was known publicly when Apple decided to deprive Google Maps on iOS 6 and replace it with its homemade Apple Maps, which sadly then became a huge flop for Apple.

Although Google Maps then made it back again on iOS 6 in the form of app on iTunes, many people believed that this could be the first sign that Apple Search is heading to iOS anytime soon. Unfortunately, we never heard about the existence of Apple’s search engine ever since.

But the rumors were raised again from the dead when Apple reportedly hired Bill Stasior, an Amazon’s executive who had years of experience in search engine world. He was assigned by Apple to handle the development of SIRI. And at the beginning of this year, we also saw …