Veritone Licensing Expands Global News Library with Exclusive Agreement with the South China Morning Post

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New agreement adds SCMP’s international news content dating back over 100 years to the Veritone content licensing portfolio

Veritone, Inc. (Nasdaq: VERI), the creator of the world’s first operating system for artificial intelligence, aiWARE™, and provider of digital content licensing services on behalf of the world’s premier sports entities, news organizations and user-generated networks, today announced a new agreement with South China Morning Post, a leading global news company that has reported on China and Asia for more than a century.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005137/en/

Veritone Licensing signs exclusive agreement with the South China Morning Post to expands its global news library. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The agreement gives Veritone the exclusive rights to license SCMP’s archive and current video content to its clients in North America. The deal is a significant milestone in Veritone’s strategy to further expand the global reach of its already vast, AI-powered content library and enable content creators to engage with new and existing audiences through highly relevant content.

“We are thrilled to announce our new agreement with the South China Morning Post, as it has a long and decorated history as a leading news company in China and Asia,” said Jay Bailey, vice president of entertainment licensing at Veritone. “At Veritone, we are proud to add this unique Asian voice from an important source on the world’s stage to our expanding news library as we continue our mission to provide creatives with greater options to tell their stories.”

The Post is Hong Kong’s paper of record and has been a unique link between China and the rest of the world since the newspaper’s founding in 1903. It has a growing correspondent staff across Asia and the United States. The agreement covers a comprehensive collection of SCMP’s content that

South Korea pushes for AI semiconductors as global demand grows

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The South Korean government has made no secret of its ambition to be a key player in the global artificial intelligence industry, including making the semiconductors powering AI functionalities.

This week, the country’s information and communications technology regulator announced plans to develop up to 50 types of AI -focused system semiconductors by 2030, Yonhap News Agency reported. The government will be on the hunt for thousands of local experts to lead the new wave of innovation.

South Korean has made several promises to support next-generation chip companies in recent times. Earlier this year, for example, it announced plans to spend about 1 trillion won ($870 million) on AI chips commercialization and production before 2029. Last year, President Moon Jae-in announced his “Presidential Initiative for AI” to raise public awareness on the industry.

These efforts come amid growing demand for AI-related chips, which, by McKinsey estimates, could account for almost 20% of all semiconductor demand and generate about $67 billion in revenue by 2025.

South Korea is already home to two of the world’s largest memory chip makers — Samsung and SK hynix. While that’s a lucrative industry, it’s one relying more on “the manufacturing process rather than core technologies,” observed Seewan Toong, an independent IT industry expert.

“It’s about making the chip smaller, denser, more efficient, and putting more memory on one chip,” he added.

The country wants to make its semiconductors smarter and vow to own 20% of the global AI chip market by 2030, according to Yonhap.

Samsung dabbled in next-gen chips as it became the mass-production partner for Baidu’s AI chips late last year. In July, the conglomerate announced hiring 1,000 new staff to work on chips and AI. SK hynix has picked its own Chinese ally by backing Horizon Robotics, an AI chip designer last valued

South Bay teen author shares love of coding through books

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In “The Code Detectives,” two middle school girls who love coding use artificial intelligence to solve mysteries. For 17-year-old author Ria Dosha, writing the book series is a way to advocate for increasing diversity within the technology field.

“I’ve brought a diverse cast of characters to life, with the series centering around Ramona Diaz, a powerful young girl of color,” says Ria, a student at Cupertino’s Monta Vista High School. “The book series gives young girls strong, fictional role models in technology and AI, and introduces them to AI topics in a compelling way, clearing common misconceptions.”

Ria writes what shoe knows, and vice versa. She is the founder of CodeBuddies, which uses workshops, panels, challenges and more to promote problem-solving through technology. She is also the founder of Monta Vista’s Women in AI club, where she teaches girls the impact of artificial intelligence in daily life.

Her work has earned her international recognition. She was part of the U.S. Championship team that developed an app for the Technovation Challenge, a competition for girls ages 10-18 to develop mobile apps that address real-world problems. The app, Alleviate, helps individuals with autism overcome challenges they face using speech recognition.

Recently, Ria was named a 24 under 24 Global Leader in STEM by the Mars Generation (TMG), a nonprofit founded in 2015 by then 18-year-old Abigail Harrison to excite kids and adults about space and STEM/STEAM education. Nominees must be members of TMG’s Student Space Ambassador Leadership Program, through which they agree to share their passion for same.

Ria’s excitement for artificial intelligence and computer science started in ninth grade, when she participated in the Stanford AI4ALL program researching cancerous genes using machine learning. Her stated goal is to learn as much as she can about artificial intelligence through real-world research projects,

First study to compare dietary signatures of African and South American mammals in quest to reconstruct ancient ecosystems finds need for revisions — ScienceDaily

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Closed-canopy rainforests are a vital part of the Earth’s modern ecosystems, but tropical plants don’t preserve well in the fossil record so it is difficult to tell how long these habitats have existed and where rainforests might have once grown. Instead, scientists look to the diets of extinct animals, which lock evidence of the vegetation they ate into their teeth. A new study led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History finds that the paradigm used to identify closed-canopy rainforests through dietary signatures needs to be reassessed. The findings are published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“The Amazon is the world’s most diverse rainforest, home to one in 10 known species on Earth,” said Julia Tejada-Lara, who led the study as a graduate student at the Museum and Columbia University. “Closed-canopy rainforests have been proposed to occur in this area since at least the Eocene, some 50 million years ago, but we know very little about their extent and evolution through time.”

To reconstruct ancient ecosystems, including rainforests, researchers often use stable carbon isotope (?13C) analyses on extinct and living herbivores. Stable carbon isotopes, which form in specific proportions inside plants, are preserved in the body tissues of the animals that eat those plants. Samples from the animal’s bones, teeth, toenails, or other biological material can help scientists determine the kinds of plants that were consumed.

In the new study, Tejada and her colleagues analyzed specimens from the American Museum of Natural History and the Museum of Natural History in Lima representing 45 modern herbivores and 12 species of “secondary consumers” (meat-, insect-, and fish-eaters) that live in western Amazonia. The authors then compared their results with a landmark analysis of modern mammals in equatorial Africa, a generally accepted proxy

Nearly Half of South America’s Mammals Came from North America, New Research May Explain Why | Smart News

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North and South America haven’t always been connected. South America functioned as a continent-sized island for millions of years following the extinction of the dinosaurs, incubating its own strange assembly of animals such as giant ground sloths, massive armored mammals akin to armadillos and saber-toothed marsupial carnivores. Meanwhile, North America was exchanging animals with Asia, populating it with the ancestors of modern horses, camels and cats, writes Asher Elbein for the New York Times.

Finally, when tectonic activity formed the Isthmus of Panama roughly ten million years ago, a massive biological exchange took place. The many species that had been evolving in isolation from one another on both continents began migrating across the narrow new land bridge. Llamas, raccoons, wolves and bears trekked south, while armadillos, possums and porcupines went north.

It would be reasonable to expect this grand biological and geological event, known to paleontologists as the Great American Biotic Interchange, resulted in equal numbers of northern and southern species spreading across the two land masses; but that’s not what happened.

Instead, many more North American mammal species made homes down south than the other way around. Almost half of living South American mammals have North American evolutionary roots, whereas only around ten percent of North American mammals once hailed from South America. Now, researchers who reviewed some 20,000 fossils may have an answer, according to the Times.

According to the paper, published this week in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the asymmetry of immigrant mammal diversity we see today was the result of droves of South American mammals going extinct, leaving gaping ecological holes waiting to be filled by northern species and reducing the pool of potential immigrant species to make the trek north, reports Christine Janis, an ecologist at