Apple Launches iPhone 12 Line With 5G Speeds, New Screens

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(Bloomberg) — Apple Inc. unveiled its latest range of iPhones, a product line that Wall Street expects will kick off a new cycle of sales growth for the world’s largest technology company.

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At a virtual event on Tuesday, the company showed off the iPhone 12 in black, red, blue, green and white with a 6.1-inch screen. It starts at $799. A smaller version, the iPhone 12 mini, costs $699. The phones use aluminum sides.

There’s also an iPhone 12 Pro, starting at $999 and a iPhone 12 Pro Max that costs at least $1,099, both with stainless steel edges. The Max has a 6.7-inch (17 cm) screen, Apple’s largest ever, while the regular Pro has a 6.1-inch display. They come in blue, gold, graphite or silver.

Some analysts praised Apple’s pricing strategy, especially the $699 mini handset which may entice users with older, smaller iPhones to upgrade.

“The pricing dynamics are the killer app for the phone launch,” Harsh Kumar of Piper Sandler & Co. wrote in a research note. “Pricing was lower than our expectation, which is important in the current global pandemic.” Cheaper devices may help increase Apple’s installed base of devices, driving further growth of more profitable services, he added.

The front of the phones looks similar to last year’s iPhone 11, but the edges are now flat instead of curved. They all support 5G, a new wireless standard that can transmit data as much as 10 times faster than the current 4G LTE technology.

The Cupertino, California-based technology giant has generated relatively little sales growth from its marquee product in recent years as consumers hold onto their phones for longer. Quarterly revenue from this segment peaked in the first quarter of Apple’s 2018 fiscal year.



a screen shot of an open laptop computer sitting on top of a desk: Apple Holds Virtual Event To Unveil 5G iPhones


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Apple Holds Virtual Event To Unveil 5G

Analysis: New Apple ‘iPhone 12’ to offer 5G speeds U.S. networks can’t deliver

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(Reuters) – 5G will finally get its U.S. closeup with the expected debut of Apple Inc’s next iPhone on Tuesday. But the blazing speeds promised will not materialize for most people.

FILE PHOTO: The Apple Inc. logo is seen hanging at the entrance to the Apple store on 5th Avenue in Manhattan, New York, U.S., October 16, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Segar

The device, dubbed the iPhone 12 by analysts, can tap into 5G, or fifth generation wireless technology, that theoretically operates as much as 10 to 20 times faster than current 4G wireless networks. [nL1N2H0004]

Using the next iPhone or any 5G enabled device on today’s network, however, will be “like having a Ferrari … but using it in your local village and you can’t drive to up to 200 miles per hour, simply because the roads cannot maintain those speeds,” explained Boris Metodiev, associate director of research firm Strategy Analytics.

Apple, which is expected to unveil the new phone at a virtual event on Tuesday, will need to walk a tightrope between enticing consumers to upgrade their phones while not over-promising what 5G can do today.

Current 5G U.S. networks mostly use low-band wireless spectrum, or airspace, that is slower than high-band spectrum, but more reliable over longer distances. It will likely take years before the massive speed boost phone carriers promise will make augmented reality and real-time cloud gaming seamless.

Several U.S. telecom operators have deployed networks based on lower spectrum bands, with slightly higher speeds than 4G. A noticeably faster variant of “mid-band” 5G is also being rolled out, but it is unlikely to reach three-quarters of Americans until 2025, estimated longtime Apple analyst Gene Munster of venture capitalist firm Loup Ventures.

The fastest speeds touted by carriers are a type of 5G

New Apple ‘iPhone 12’ to offer 5G speeds U.S. networks can’t deliver

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By Supantha Mukherjee and Kenneth Li

(Reuters) – 5G will finally get its U.S. closeup with the expected debut of Apple Inc’s next iPhone on Tuesday. But the blazing speeds promised will not materialize for most people.

The device, dubbed the iPhone 12 by analysts, can tap into 5G, or fifth generation wireless technology, that theoretically operates as much as 10 to 20 times faster than current 4G wireless networks.

Using the next iPhone or any 5G enabled device on today’s network, however, will be “like having a Ferrari … but using it in your local village and you can’t drive to up to 200 miles per hour, simply because the roads cannot maintain those speeds,” explained Boris Metodiev, associate director of research firm Strategy Analytics.

Apple, which is expected to unveil the new phone at a virtual event on Tuesday, will need to walk a tightrope between enticing consumers to upgrade their phones while not over-promising what 5G can do today.

Current 5G U.S. networks mostly use low-band wireless spectrum, or airspace, that is slower than high-band spectrum, but more reliable over longer distances. It will likely take years before the massive speed boost phone carriers promise will make augmented reality and real-time cloud gaming seamless.

Several U.S. telecom operators have deployed networks based on lower spectrum bands, with slightly higher speeds than 4G. A noticeably faster variant of “mid-band” 5G is also being rolled out, but it is unlikely to reach three-quarters of Americans until 2025, estimated longtime Apple analyst Gene Munster of venture capitalist firm Loup Ventures.

The fastest speeds touted by carriers are a type of 5G called millimeter Wave, or mmWave, that work over shorter distances. Verizon Communications Inc has the largest current mmWave network, available only in limited areas.

Although Verizon 5G users could

Woolworths speeds up online grocery orders with automated fulfilment technology

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Image: Leigh Henningham/Woolworths

Woolworths has deployed its first micro-automation technology in the e-commerce facility located at the back of its existing Melbourne-based Carrum Downs supermarket, in a bid to speed up the delivery of online grocery orders.

The supermarket giant claims to be the first in Australia to deploy the Takeoff technology, which has been designed to sort and move up to 10,000 grocery products from automated storage units to team members that are handpicking customer orders. Fresh fruit, vegetables, and meat will continue to be handpicked from the shop floor, Woolworth said.

According to Woolworths Group CEO Brad Banducci, automating the picking of products will help dispatch five times the online order volume of a standard Woolworths store.

“As customer expectations continue to rise, we’re investing in new technology to keep pace with the growth and focusing on building an ever more convenient online offer,” he said.

“The micro-fulfilment technology in this e-store is a potential game-changer. It will help us deliver unparalleled speed and accuracy in the online picking process while keeping us close to our customers for faster and more flexible deliveries to the home.”

See also: Map shows how COVID-19 has a major impact on e-commerce (TechRepublic)

Banducci added how introducing the technology would reduce congestion on the shop floor, as personal shoppers will be able to pick and pack items at the back of house, as well as boost the availability of same-day delivery.

Carrum Downs is the first of three initial Woolworths sites to trial the technology. Woolworths confirmed the two other sites will be in Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand. It also has plans to introduce the technology to another site in Australia, with details of its location to be confirmed.

Woolworths saw online orders skyrocket during the height of the coronavirus pandemic,

Comcast Reaches 10G Technical Milestone Delivering 1.25 Gig Symmetrical Speeds in Trial Over a Live, All-Digital HFC Network

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Trial shows future path to delivering multi-gigabit symmetrical speeds using Network Function Virtualization technology in a hybrid fiber-coaxial (HFC) network

Comcast today announced that it has achieved a 10G technical milestone in a trial delivering 1.25 gigabit-per-second (Gbps) upload and download speeds over a live production network using Network Function Virtualization (NFV) combined with the latest DOCSIS Technology.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201008005824/en/

The trial also represents an important milestone on the path to deliver on the promise of the industry’s 10G platform, which aims to enable 10-gigabits-per-second speeds and beyond. (Graphic: Business Wire)

At a home in Jacksonville, Florida, technicians have installed the service which is based upon a Distributed Access Architecture (DAA) that Comcast has deployed throughout the area. This advanced architecture includes a suite of software-powered networking technologies, including digital fiber optics, “Remote PHY” digital nodes, and a cloud-based, virtualized cable modem termination system platform (vCMTS), enabling delivery of gigabit-plus symmetrical speeds using existing cable connections. The technology team consistently measured speeds of 1.25 Gbps upload and 1.25 Gbps download over the connection.

“Our customers build their digital lives on the foundation of our Internet service, so we continue to push the technological envelope to anticipate their future needs,” said Tony Werner, President of Technology, Product, Xperience at Comcast Cable. “The great strength of our network technology is that we will have the ability to scale these next-generation speeds to tens of millions of homes in the future without digging up yards, or starting massive construction projects. This technology provides a path to meeting the needs of the future and making multi-gigabit symmetrical speeds a reality for everyone, not just a select few.”

Comcast has been an industry leader in deploying and evolving network virtualization and DAA, which replaces