Shining A Spotlight On Corporate Readiness Through The Lens Of Learning And Development

0 Comments

CEO of AllenComm since 2003.

Corporate leaders have long understood that demonstrating value to shareholders must include navigating and managing change. From the early days of Kurt Lewin’s change management model, it has been well understood that companies need to adequately prepare for both sudden unexpected shifts and gradual changes.

The current economic and health crises have propelled organizations toward long-overdue examinations of the role of employee training and development in shaping corporate readiness. It’s often said that 70% of change initiatives fail. While the Harvard Business Review has estimated that number is actually around 10%, it should still be no surprise that failure to adapt to changes due to the coronavirus can have far-reaching ramifications for employees and stockholders.

Although industries have seen several sudden disruptions due to advancements in technology, sudden changes due to Covid-19 have revealed unexpected challenges. Some organizations quickly overcame or adapted to these challenges; others have not. Moreover, as the CEO of a company that provides corporate training solutions, I’ve observed that the difference between the two types of organizations is the heavy use of learning and development teams or performance consultants to further organizational readiness.

So, perhaps it would be beneficial for business leaders to expand upon their definition of “readiness” to encompass the supporting role their learning and development teams can play. While it’s important to categorically separate technology and infrastructure preparedness from people readiness, L&D teams have a unique, multi-faceted role in both.

The Role Of L&D In Corporate Readiness

For this discussion, readiness is a state of preparedness of persons, systems or organizations to meet a situation and carry out a planned sequence of actions. The first step for human resources and L&D is to define how these resources come in to play both for corporate readiness and, more

Prime Day 2020 security camera deals: Get a Blink Mini for $25, Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera for $100

0 Comments

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

 Amazon Prime Day is a go, and if you’re raring to bag yourself a deal on a security camera there are lots of options available. We’ve got all of the best Prime Day deals covered elsewhere, but we’re here to talk exclusively on home security cameras. There are some great savings to be had on products from ArloRing and Blink — we especially like the Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera for $200.

If you don’t see what you’re looking for right now be sure to check back — we’ll be updating the deals as Prime Day goes on.

Currently available

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, which retails for $130, is $30 off for Prime Day. At $100, The Essential Spotlight Camera has HD live streaming, alerts, a built-in siren and spotlight — and optional advanced features with the Arlo Smart cloud subscription plan.

Amazon also has a deal on an Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera multi-pack for Prime Day — $300 for three cameras (save $50). 

Read the review.

Arlo

The battery-powered Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera is an excellent outdoor light fixture-security camera hybrid. Typically retailing for $250, it’s $50 for Prime Day. Like the Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, the Pro 3 Floodlight has HD live streaming, motion alerts, a built-in light fixture and siren — and more if you subscribe to the optional Arlo Smart service.

Read the review.

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Blink Mini is one of the Amazon brand’s newer indoor security cameras — and it typically costs $35. Now, with a $10 discount, you can snag one for just $25. It’s similar to the Wyze

Prime Day 2020 security camera deals: Blink Mini for $25, Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera for $100

0 Comments

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

 Amazon Prime Day is here, and if you’re raring to bag yourself a deal on a security camera there are lots of options available. We’ve got all of the best Prime Day deals covered elsewhere, but we’re here to talk exclusively on home security cameras. There are some great savings to be had on products from ArloRing and Blink — we especially like the Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera for $200.

If you don’t see what you’re looking for right now be sure to check back — we’ll be updating the deals as Prime Day goes on.

Currently available

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, which retails for $130, is $30 off for Prime Day. At $100, The Essential Spotlight Camera has HD live streaming, alerts, a built-in siren and spotlight — and optional advanced features with the Arlo Smart cloud subscription plan.

Amazon also has a deal on an Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera multi-pack for Prime Day — $300 for three cameras (save $50). 

Read the review.

Arlo

The battery-powered Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera is an excellent outdoor light fixture-security camera hybrid. Typically retailing for $250, it’s $50 for Prime Day. Like the Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, the Pro 3 Floodlight has HD live streaming, motion alerts, a built-in light fixture and siren — and more if you subscribe to the optional Arlo Smart service.

Read the review.

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Blink Mini is one of the Amazon brand’s newer indoor security cameras — and it typically costs $35. Now, with a $10 discount, you can snag one for just $25. It’s similar to the Wyze Cam

Ava DuVernay Partners With Lenovo And The UN’s Girl Up To Spotlight Young Female Trailblazers Around The World

0 Comments

Oluwakemi Dauda, a 20-year-old University of Michigan student, isn’t easily satisfied. When she noticed that her high school was lacking teachers and resources, so much so that the ceiling was rotting away, she took matters into her own hands and registered for a computer application class and sought support from non-profit education organization NAF to supplement her education. 

That led her to create Steps to Success, an educational app for young children with severe literacy issues in Detroit. When she launched the tool in 2015, 50% of adults in Detroit were considered “functionally illiterate.” 

Dauda is one of 10 women from around the world featured in New Realities, a series of films highlighting young female leaders making a difference in their communities. Backed by award-winning filmmaker Ava DuVernay and her film collective Array, as well as Lenovo and the United Nations’ Girl Up initiative, the films were directed by virtual reality creator and director Mary Matheson, who used VR technology to give audiences a more intimate look into these women’s lives. They are streaming for free on Lenovo’s website beginning Thursday, just ahead of International Day Of The Girl on October 11.

“I want girls to see themselves in us and be able to find their voices in our films,” says Dauda. “If you can’t see yourself somewhere, your likelihood of trying to get there is not going to be high.” 

New Realities chronicles Dauda’s experience founding Steps to Success and later Bringing Hope Back Home, a nonprofit organization that prepares underrepresented high school students for college. 

The

Pizza-making robot startup Picnic raises $3M as pandemic puts spotlight on food automation

0 Comments

Picnic’s pizza-making robot at CES earlier this year. (GeekWire Photo / Taylor Soper)

Seattle startup Picnic raised an additional $3 million from existing investors as it gears up for a commercial rollout of its pizza-making robot.

Vulcan Capital, Flying Fish Partners, Creative Ventures, Arnold Venture Group, and others put more money behind Picnic, known for its automated food preparation device that can churn out up to 300 12-inch customized pizzas per hour. It follows a $5 million seed round in November.

The fresh cash will be used for product development, response to customer interest, new hires, and marketing. The company has seen increased demand for its machine during the pandemic from customers looking for ways to prepare food with less contact.

“This work is important because we’re supporting struggling restaurants who are looking for any advantage that will help them weather the storm of losing 60% of their sales,” CEO Clayton Wood wrote in a blog post earlier this year. “By surviving through this, they’ll be in a position to re-hire lost workers and find their way in the new, forever-changed world of food service.”

Picnic CEO Clayton Wood at his company’s booth on the CES show floor earlier this year. (GeekWire Photos / Taylor Soper)

Picnic, previously known as Otto Robotics and Vivid Robotics, is among a bevy of startups and larger industry giants trying to find ways to automate restaurant kitchens amid slim margins and labor shortages. The pandemic has put attention on food automation as restaurants and food preparation companies navigate around new hygiene protocols.

Robotic chefs have yet to go mainstream, but Picnic rival XRobotics launched earlier this month with its own pizza-making machine. DaVinci Kitchen will soon debut an automated robot pasta kiosk.

Meanwhile, Little Caesar’s has a patent for a pizza-making robot. White Castle