The Ultimate Guide To Starting A Side Hustle Part 6: Marketing

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When you are starting a side hustle, one of the most important things you can do for your business is market. But marketing can get pretty out of control if not planned strategically. The first thing you need to do is make sure your marketing is synergistic with your sales plan. 

Years ago, I worked for an ad agency in San Diego. Out of the blue someone called our office and asked to speak to the media buyer – which was me. I answered the call and it was a local plumber, who serviced commercial buildings and businesses. He wanted to know if we could create an ad for his business to shine on the side of building at night – because he saw this done in Las Vegas the weekend before and thought it was clever. 

So I asked him, “This particular ad would only be seen during evening hours – half of each day, with very little exposure during the middle of the night, correct?”

“Uh, yeah, I guess so,” he replied.

I then asked, “Do you know how many of your prospects – business owners or commercial property managers – drive past this particular building during evening hours to see it?” 

“Um, no,” he said.

“Are there other media outlets that your prospect might consume that isn’t just shown overnight, in one spot in town and has more data we could look at?” I asked. 

“Probably. I’ll call you back.” 

Not surprising, but he never called back. What he thought was a clever marketing tactic was completely out of line for his business and would be a total waste of his marketing dollars. It’s wildly important that your marketing support your sales efforts when you have a side hustle. 

Typically when starting out marketing dollars are sparse,

The Ultimate Guide To Starting A Side Hustle Part 4: Automation & Systems

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A side hustle is defined as doing something on the side – which means that you’ll be juggling your other life responsibilities. So one of the best things you can do for yourself and your business is to automate, define systems and standard operations that can easily run without your constant attention. Any task that you repeat should be automated so that you can free up your time and attention. Anything that is vital to the health of the business needs to be systematized so that it can be repeated by others you may bring on down the road. 

One of my favorite business books, “eMyth Revisited” by Michael Gerber is a fantastic book on why you need to create systems and how to do it successfully. He also details out the pitfalls and burnout that can occur by not creating systems. If you are a new entrepreneur, it’s hard to see when burnout is upon you, until it hits. Automation and systems are safeguards that your side hustle will be healthy for your business and your life.

Here are some things you definitely need to automate in your side hustle:

Lead Generation & Nurturing

Getting customers should be your number one priority, so systematizing your lead generation and nuture process should be a very high priority. Finding a good CRM will be crucial to getting this right and taking hours off your plate.

93% of converted leads are called six times according to Velocify and shockingly, 50% of leads are never contacted after the first call! This means, you MUST make more than one phone call, in fact, you must make at least six. This may seem like a lot, but

Along with several other factors, including starting periods early, use of combined oral contraceptives, and early menopause — ScienceDaily

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Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data published by The BMJ today.

Several other factors related to fertility and pregnancy also seem to be associated with subsequent cardiovascular disease, say the researchers, including starting periods early, use of combined oral contraceptives, polycystic ovary syndrome, and early menopause.

However, a longer length of breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Previous research has suggested that risk factors specific to women may be linked to cardiovascular disease and stroke, but clarity on the quality of the evidence is lacking and on how the findings can be translated into public health and clinical practice.

So a team of UK researchers searched relevant research databases for published systematic reviews and meta-analyses that investigated links between reproductive factors in women of reproductive age and their subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease.

A total of 32 reviews were included, evaluating multiple risk factors over an average follow-up period of 7-10 years.

The researchers found that several factors, including starting periods early (early menarche), use of combined oral contraceptives, polycystic ovary syndrome, miscarriage, stillbirth, pre-eclampsia, diabetes during pregnancy, pre-term birth, low birth weight, and early menopause were associated with an up to twofold risk of cardiovascular outcomes.

Pre-eclampsia was associated with a fourfold risk of heart failure.

Possible explanations for these associations include family medical history, genetics, weight, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and chemical imbalances from use of hormonal contraceptives.

However, no association was found between cardiovascular disease outcomes and current use of progesterone only contraceptives, use of non-oral hormonal contraceptive agents, or fertility treatment.

What’s more, breastfeeding was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

States are finally starting to use the Covid-tracking tech Apple and Google built — here’s why

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  • New York and New Jersey both released Covid-19 apps this week, bringing the total to 10 states which have published alert apps using technology from the Apple-Google partnership.
  • 70 million people, or 21% of the U.S. population, now has access to a Covid-19 app.
  • Covid apps are starting to catch on six months after the system was first announced because it is becoming faster and easier for governments to build the apps.
  • New York and New Jersey’s apps also work across some state lines, addressing a major issue with the early versions. 



Andrew Cuomo wearing a suit and tie: New York state Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a news conference on September 08, 2020 in New York City.


© Provided by CNBC
New York state Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a news conference on September 08, 2020 in New York City.

Six months after it was announced, the tech that Apple and Google built for sending Covid-19 exposure alerts to smartphones is finally gaining momentum in the United States.

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New York and New Jersey both released Covid-19 alert apps this week, bringing the total to 10 states plus Guam which have published apps using technology from the Apple-Google partnership. 70 million people, or 21% of the U.S. population, now has access to a Covid-19 app, according to a CNBC analysis using U.S. Census data. 

More are coming soon, too. Five other states plus Washington D.C. have announced plans to use the Apple-Google exposure notification system, and California and Arizona are currently testing apps in pilot programs. 

If the system works properly, the apps will provide push alerts to any user who came in close contact to another app user who tested positive for the coronavirus. Users can also use the apps to alert everyone they were nearby that they tested positive without revealing their name or phone number.

For health bodies and governments, the apps could help slow the spread of the coronavirus by

Windows on Arm will support a lot more apps starting next month

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Microsoft Edge Chromium Surface Pro X

  • Microsoft has announced that 64-bit app emulation is coming to Windows on Arm next month.
  • The feature will be offered to consumers in the Windows Insider program first.
  • It allows users to run more legacy 64-bit Windows apps, such as games and editing tools.

The first Windows on Arm laptops and convertibles were released in 2018, offering Windows 10 on power-efficient Arm chips rather than legacy x64 silicon from Intel and AMD. Microsoft used emulation to allow 32-bit legacy apps to still run on Windows on Arm, but 64-bit app emulation hasn’t been possible until now.

Now, the Redmond company has announced (h/t: XDA-Developers) that it will indeed bring 64-bit app emulation to Windows on Arm next month. The company says users in the Windows Insider program will get the feature first, so users at large can expect to get it some time thereafter.

This was one of the biggest omissions from Windows on Arm up until now, as it meant that 64-bit only legacy apps such as several Adobe creative apps and numerous games simply wouldn’t work on these machines (although 64-bit Arm apps still worked). So those hoping to use Adobe Premiere Pro CS5, the 64-bit version of Photoshop, or wanting to play more games via Steam can theoretically do so, although performance, polish and power consumption remains to be seen.

There’s still more room for improvement though, especially when it comes to driver support on the Arm-powered platform. More specifically, Microsoft previously noted that drivers for hardware, games, and apps will only work if they’re designed for Windows on Arm. In other words, those reliant on legacy peripherals seem to be largely out of luck for now. But hopefully we see developments in this regard if Microsoft isn’t already focusing on this issue.

Nevertheless, our own