The Right Way For U.S. Startups To Expand Into Europe

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For companies with global ambitions, especially those in the U.S. looking to expand internationally, Europe is a natural first choice given its maturity and large consumer market. Because of this maturity, many companies assume taking a ‘copy-and-paste’ approach to European expansion will suffice. However, as with any new market, there are nuances and keys to success that can make or break a company’s ability to survive and hopefully thrive in uncharted territory. The good news: there are tried and true methods to guide companies looking to make the leap.

On the heels of growth stage fund Frontline X’s European Expansion 2020 Report, which analyzed 175 venture-backed B2B Software companies that have expanded into Europe over the past 15 years, I spoke with Frontline Partner Stephen McIntyre about keys to success and mistakes to avoid for companies looking to enter the European market and internationalize operations. McIntyre has no shortage of insights on the topic, having previously run Google’s ad business in the EMEA (Europe, Middle East & Africa) and set up Twitter’s first international office as their VP of EMEA. 

Why Europe?

With an increasing focus on emerging markets in Latin America and Asia, what is it that sets Europe apart from these other large and affordable markets as the first regional expansion for U.S. B2B software businesses? According to McIntyre, it all boils down to the size of the market and where the customers are located. In the case of B2B software, Europe is always the 2nd largest market after the U.S., and in particular, the United Kingdom—Europe’s premier ecosystem—shares a language, culture and legal characteristics with the U.S. As a general rule, in Western Europe it’s easier to co-locate U.S. tech style engineering teams with sales teams

Did COVID-19 steal your sales? This is how 9 Latin American startups successfully entered e-commerce

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5 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Technological innovation and process optimization are booming. Changes and restrictions in physical interaction since the pandemic have forced companies to change the way they operate and do business, the recent McKinsey & Company survey “What 800 executives envision for the postpandemic workface ” conducted of executives of companies around the world, shows that a third of companies have accelerated the digitization of their supply chains, half have accelerated the digitization of their customer service channels, and two-thirds have more quickly adopted artificial intelligence and automation.

Undoubtedly, the pandemic has shown us that the digitization of companies of any size is necessary and that being prepared and being able to adapt quickly is essential. There has been an important evolution in consumer habits and in the adoption of purchasing through digital media, as mentioned in the eMarketer report, Latin America Ecommerce 2020 ( How COVID-19 will affect growth and sales in Argentina , Brazil and Mexico ), the region will have 191.7 million digital buyers and more than 10.8 million consumers will make a digital purchase for the first time this year.

In the region there are startups that are helping this entire process, standing out for presenting relevant innovations for sales processes, for promoting the digital transformation of companies through disruptive solutions that help them automate logistics and delivery processes, to increase productivity, for promoting customer loyalty and for allowing correct decision-making with the use of Big Data .

Here are some examples of these solutions, and the name of the startups that lead these changes, promoted by and belonging to Wayra , the Venture Capital of Telefónica

It’s Time For Startups To Use AI To Battle Tech Giants In Patent Wars

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Technology giants such as Alibaba and IBM are eating startup innovators’ lunch. These behemoths are seeking to devour even more market share by publishing patents at unprecedented speed in emerging technologies such as blockchain.

As some of the richest companies on the planet, the corporations have the resources to manage the laborious search of existing patents and to overcome the outdated administrative hurdles so that they can file for intellectual property rights.

Patents are definitely old school. Patent laws started with the rise of the nation-state, so they began in the 18th century and were then fully developed in the 19th century. Some changes may have been made to reflect new technologies, but the basic patent laws haven’t evolved to meet the needs of the 21st century.

We’re patenting ideas based on today’s high-tech of artificial intelligence and blockchain with laws that were established centuries ago.

All this puts early-growth companies with game-changing inventions at a huge disadvantage.

Getting a patent is one of the most important strategic decisions a business can take. A patent not only protects a business idea from copycats, but it can also increase the value of the young company.

One of the reasons value increases is because a patent can block others from a market. Once a startup has it, they can make sure nobody else will enter that particular segment.

In a recent study, conducted by KISSPatent on patents in the specific field of blockchain, results showed an arms race between Alibaba and IBM. The Chinese e-commerce giant has published 10 times more blockchain-related patents than IBM in 2020, a year when blockchain patent numbers are generally skyrocketing. More blockchain-related patents were published in the first half of 2020 than in all of 2019, a year that had already seen three times more blockchain

The top 12 VC firms most actively investing in early-stage AI startups

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  • Artificial intelligence is one of the buzziest technologies of the past 20 years. 
  • Since 2000, investors have poured roughly $407 billion into AI startups, per data from PitchBook. 
  • In that time frame, the top 12 VC firms most active in early-stage AI investing by deal count have collectively closed a total of 708 Series A and B rounds, according to the data analytics firm. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Over the past two decades, artificial intelligence has quickly become one of the most buzzy technologies. 

Giants like IBM have doubled-down on AI-backed offerings, while a rush of startups have emerged that are trying to use the tech to overhaul operations ranging from stocking shelves to supply chain negotiations.

Along with that has come a bonanza of venture capital funding that has created so-called unicorns like Indigo Ag, UiPath, and SenseTime. In the past 20 years, investors have poured roughly $407 billion into AI startups, per data firm PitchBook. 

Since 2000, the top 12 VC firms most active in early-stage AI investing by deal count have collectively closed a total of 708 Series A and B rounds, according to research from the data analytics firm provided to Business Insider (the rounds that fit PitchBook’s criteria for “early-stage”). 

Below is a snapshot of each of the dozen firms, including well-known names like Andreessen Horowitz, Intel Capital, and GV. 

Source Article

Here are the top European startups where people want to work in 2020

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  • LinkedIn published its Top Startups of 2020, which features the startups its users most want to work for in different countries.
  • Featured companies in Europe include transportation startups such as Arrival and Dott; neo-banks such as Revolut and N26; and health startups like Doctolib.
  • We’ve got exclusive data on the top startups across six European countries, and ranked the first five for each.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

LinkedIn has released its annual ranking of the hottest startups to work for.

The list is based on how half a billion LinkedIn users interact with startups on the site across four areas: user engagement with the company and its employees, employee growth, job applications started on LinkedIn, and how often people working for firms on LinkedIn’s top companies list — a different list of firms with over 500 employees — move over to these startups. 

Business Insider got exclusive data from LinkedIn on its top-ranked startups across six European countries — the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, and the Netherlands.

To be eligible for the list, companies had to be founded in the last seven years, privately held, and headquartered in the country on whose list they appear. The firms had to have a minimum of 50 employees — so the list excludes some smaller startups. 

Scroll down to see the list of the top 30 startups across Europe. We’ve ranked the top five from each of the six European countries below. 

The UK

Arrival is the top startup in the UK

Founded in 2015, Oxford-based startup Arrival is working on prototypes for electric vehicles including buses and delivery vans.

Arrival’s position in the ranking reflects the rise of electric vehicle sales in Europe in the first quarter of 2020. According to the latest McKinsey report, the number