Virginia Approves STEMscopes Digital STEM Curriculum in State Science Textbook Adoption

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Accelerate Learning today announced that the STEMscopes digital STEM curriculum has been approved by the Virginia Board of Education as part of the state textbook adoption for science. The adoption of STEMscopes Virginia includes grades K-6 and Physical Science, Life Science, Chemistry, and Physics.

STEMscopes Virginia is a comprehensive, hands-on STEM curriculum that is built from the ground up to the 2018 Virginia Science Standards of Learning and Curriculum Framework. STEMscopes is centered on phenomena-based instruction to drive student inquiry and a passion for STEM. Through the research-based 5E plus intervention and acceleration learning model, students explore scientific concepts through dynamic phenomena found in everyday life.

“We’re pleased that STEMscopes will be an integral part of student inquiry in science in Virginia schools and districts,” said Dr. Vernon Johnson, president and CEO of Accelerate Learning. “With STEMscopes, students actually do science, instead of simply reading about it in a textbook. STEMscopes takes a constructivist approach where students investigate real-world phenomena through hands-on, collaborative experiences, while teachers receive embedded support and the flexibility to teach in whatever style they like.”

STEMscopes combines a comprehensive digital curriculum, supplemental print materials, and ready-made exploration kits with embedded professional development to support student and teacher success. It provides easy access from any device at any time, and can be used in traditional classrooms, hybrid learning, and distance learning. It also includes a number of new features to better support distance learning and hands-on learning at home.

For information or to request a full-district or full-school access trial, visit https://www.stemscopes.com/state/va/.

About STEMscopes
STEMscopes, created by Accelerate Learning Inc., is an award-winning, research-based national leader in PreK-12 STEM curriculum. Used by over 5 million students across all 50 states, STEMscopes provides comprehensive digital resources, supplemental print materials, and hands-on exploration kits that drive engagement and academic

Families Celebrate a Spooky Science & STEM Halloween

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This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

The Cradle of Aviation Museum’s annual Family Science Nights return with the beloved “Spooky Science Night” with two socially-distant and limited attendance family sessions on Friday, October 30th at 5pm and 7pm. Each session is packed with stimulating family-fun, STEM activities and a Halloween parade to entertain the entire family. Tickets are $15.00 per person; $10 for Museum Members. All activities are included with admission. All tickets must be purchased in advance, no tickets will be sold at the door. Ideal for kids in grades K-5. Info is available at www.cradleofaviation.org/spook…

Activities include:

● Frankenstein Hands: Use your mad scientist skills to dissect frozen hands to discover what is trapped inside.

● Candy Catapults: Protecting your Halloween hoard is serious business. Construct and test your own catapults.

● Boo-Be-Gones: You ain’t afraid of no ghosts! Learn how to keep ghosts away with some homemade ghost repellant.

● Predicting the Future: Do you have a sixth sense? See if you can predict the future by studying what comes before it!

● Kepler Planet Hunt: There are thousands of exoplanets in our galaxy and some have gotten lost in our museum. Can you shed some light on their location?

“Spooky Science Night is a fun and safe way to celebrate Halloween. We are looking forward to seeing everyone in person and having a great night of science tricks and treats! “- Kerri Kiker, Planetarium Education Coordinator .

All young participants are encouraged to dress in costume according to rules in adherence with CDC guidelines as defined on the museum’s web site at www.cradleofaviation.org/spook…. There are a limited number of tickets available to ensure social distancing requirements are met throughout the duration of the program.

This new program wants to prepare teens for careers in STEM via science and storytelling

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A new program is looking to prepare teens for careers in STEM.

Rockville, Maryland-based technology and engineering solution provider Acquired Data Solutions (ADS) partnered with Edge of Yesterday Media (EOY Media), a teen time travel novel series curator, to launch the MASTERY program, a virtual learning program teaching young people tech skills via an interactive platform. MASTERY is an acronym that highlights essential skills and topics: mindset, arts, storytelling, technology, economy, economy, reflection and you.

The companies partnered to launch MASTERY following this past summer’s On-Ramps to Careers internship program when they discovered their shared passion for working with young adults preparing to transition from high school to college and eventually full-time jobs, per a press release. ADS hosted 40 students for the internship program and developed a curriculum based on concepts like technology, economics, arts, marketing and socializing for successful career paths.

During the MASTERY program, ADS will bring its engineering expertise to design thinking and building while EOY Media will use storytelling as a vehicle for meaningful learning.

“Now more than ever, it is essential to revitalize our learning process with the hope that the next generation will emerge from this historic pandemic era stronger, more compassionate, and more grounded than before,” said ADS President Steven Seiden in a statement. “The MASTERY program comes at an opportune time when many school plans are up in the air and unclear, to provide parents with a learning approach based in science and story-telling to add substance and sustainability to their children’s educational experiences.”

MASTERY will act as an after-school program and will be run on Zoom. Participating students from ninth through 12th grade will learn things like how interviewing skills and strong communication can strengthen their chances to succeed. Currently, ADS and EOY Media are creating content and are

Samsung partners with UM to boost STEM education

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Wang Yang holding a sign posing for the camera: Datuk Roh Jae Yeol.


© Provided by New Straits Times
Datuk Roh Jae Yeol.

SAMSUNG, in its effort to help promote the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education in the country, has partnered with Universiti Malaya (UM) for the Solve for Tomorrow competition.

The initiative is aimed at fostering innovative thinking, creative problem-solving and teamwork, and it is carried out in partnership with UM’s STEM Centre.

The competition is open to Form 1 and Form 2 students from participating secondary schools that Universiti Malaya STEM Centre regularly engages with to provide various STEM activities, helping them enhance their learning experience.

The Solve for Tomorrow competition kicks off today (Oct 9, 2020) and ends on Dec 8, 2020 with the announcement of winners.

According to Samsung Malaysia Electronics’ president, Yoonsoo Kim, it is important for the next generations to come to be equipped with the fundamental skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to adapt to the technological change and benefit from the new opportunities technology creates.

“We believe in their potential to reach new heights of innovation, and to develop society-changing solutions. And Samsung is committed to helping them achieve this through the educational programmes we run like Solve for Tomorrow,” he said.

Meanwhile, UM’s STEM Centre’s head Ir Dr Mas Sahidayana Mohktar, said… “We have to enhance Science and Technology knowledge among our youngsters to solve unseen future problems. They can only paint a better picture if they are equipped with the correct tools, and the best way to ensure the mechanism is accurate is through Science and Technology education.”

Samsung’s director of corporate affairs Datuk Roh Jae Yeol, said the competition will require participants to apply skills such as critical thinking and problem solving. “Throughout the competition, starting today, the participants will go through stages where they are required to submit written essays,

Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days — ScienceDaily

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Stem cells are cell factories that constantly divide themselves to create new cells. Implanting stem cells in damaged organs can regenerate new tissues. Cell sheet engineering, which allows stem cells to be transplanted into damaged areas in the form of sheets made up of only cells, completely eliminates immune rejection caused by external substances and encourages tissue regeneration. A research team led by POSTECH recently succeeded in drastically reducing the harvest period of such stem cell sheets.

A joint research team comprised of Professor Dong Sung Kim and researcher Andrew Choi of POSTECH’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Dr. InHyeok Rhyou and Dr. Ji-Ho Lee of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Pohang Semyung Christianity Hospital has significantly reduced the total harvest period of a stem cell sheet to two days. The nanotopography of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), which abruptly changes its roughness depending on temperature, allows harvesting of cell sheets that consist of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow. Considering that it takes one week on average to make stem cells into sheets using the existing techniques developed so far, this is the shortest harvest time on record. These research findings were published as a cover paper in the latest issue of Biomaterials Science, an international journal in the biomaterials field.

Professor Kim’s research team focused on PNIPAAm, a polymer that either combines with water or averts it depending on the temperature. In previous studies, PNIPAAm has been introduced as a coating material for cell culture platform to harvest cell sheets, but the range of utilization had been hampered due to the limited types of cells that can be made into sheets. For the first time in 2019, the research team developed a technology of easily regulating the roughness of 3D bulk PNIPAAm and has stably produced various