iPhone 12 Pro Buyers to Get Up To Rs. 34,000 Off on Trading Old Smartphone on Apple Online Store

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iPhone 12 Pro Buyers to Get Up To Rs. 34,000 Off on Trading Old Smartphone on Apple Online Store

Apple finally took the wraps off the iPhone 12 series last night. This year, the Cupertino-based giant did things a bit differently like launching four iPhone variants, or putting its Super Retina XDR OLED display across the whole range. Apple announced that all the iPhone 12 models will come with 5G support, and all will be powered by the same A14 Bionic chip that Apple first introduced with the iPad Air last month. Apple has priced the new iPhone’s starting at Rs. 69,900 onwards for the iPhone 12 Mini, while the iPhone 12 costs Rs. 79,900 onwards. The iPhone 12 flagship models, the iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max have been priced at Rs. 1,19,900 and Rs. 1,29,900 onwards on Apple official online store. The iPhone 12 Pro will be available for pre-orders starting October 23 and will be available from October 30. The iPhone 12 Pro Max pre-orders will start November 6, and the phone will be made available from November 13.

The iPhone 12 Pro costs Rs. 1,19,900 for the base 128GB storage variant, Rs. 1,29,900 for the 256GB option, and Rs. 1,49,900 for the top-spec 512GB storage option. The iPhone 12 Pro Max, on the other hand costs Rs. 1,29,900 for the 128GB variant, Rs. 1,39,900 for the 256GB variant, and Rs. 1,59,900 for the 512GB storage option. Like other iPhone 12 models, the iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max will also have a trade-in option for buyers. Apple is offering up to Rs. 34,000 off on the iPhone 12 Pro and 12 Pro Max on exchange via Apple Trade. Buyers can exchange any smartphone for the new iPhone 12

Stepping ‘beyond binary’ to store data in more than just 0s and 1s — ScienceDaily

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Electronic data is being produced at a breath-taking rate.

The total amount of data stored in data centres around the globe is of the order of ten zettabytes (a zettabyte is a trillion gigabytes), and we estimate that amount doubles every couple of years.

With 8% of global electricity already being consumed in information and communication technology (ICT), low-energy data-storage is a key priority.

To date there is no clear winner in the race for next-generation memory that is non-volatile, has great endurance, highly energy efficient, low cost, high density, and allows fast access operation.

The joint international team comprehensively reviews ‘multi-state memory’ data storage, which steps ‘beyond binary’ to store more data than just 0s and 1s.

MULTI-STATE MEMORY: MORE THAN JUST ZEROES AND ONES

Multi-state memory is an extremely promising technology for future data storage, with the ability to store data in more than a single bit (ie, 0 or 1) allowing much higher storage density (amount of data stored per unit area.

This circumvents the plateauing of benefits historically offered by ‘Moore’s Law’, where component size halved abut every two years. In recent years, the long-predicted plateauing of Moore’s Law has been observed, with charge leakage and spiralling research and fabrication costs putting the nail in the Moore’s Law coffin.

Non-volatile, multi-state memory (NMSM) offers energy efficiency, high, nonvolatility, fast access, and low cost.

Storage density is dramatically enhanced without scaling down the dimensions of the memory cell, making memory devices more efficient and less expensive.

NEUROMORPHIC COMPUTER MIMICKING THE HUMAN BRAIN

Multi-state memory also enables the proposed future technology neuromorphic computing, which would mirror the structure of the human brain. This radically-different, brain-inspired computing regime could potentially provide the economic impetus for adoption of a novel technology such as NMSM.

NMSMs allow analog calculation, which

Apple culls Beats webpage from online store ahead of ‘iPhone 12’ event [u]

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Apple has altered its website to remove a page for “Beats by Dre,” a possible sign that the company is shifting itself away from the headphone electronics brand in favor of its own name.

Since the purchase of Beats in 2014, Apple has promoted the popular brand at the same time as its own products, and in recent years technologies developed by Apple have crossed over to Beats devices. However, it seems that Apple is slowly moving from promoting Beats on its own website, by removing a prominent page about the hardware.

Spotted by Apple Terminal, the page in the online Apple Store for “Beats by Dr. Dre” listed the Beats products Apple sold, across multiple product lines. The list ranged from the wireless Powerbeats Pro earphones to premium over-ear models like the Beats Studio3 Wireless Headphones.

The exact date of when the page was taken down is unknown, but Wayback Machine results point to it happening between October 2 and October 9. Attempts to visit the page now result in a message stating “The page you’re looking for can’t be found.”

Despite the removal of the page, Apple is still selling Beats products in its online store as usual. It is feasible that the page could have been taken down as part of a general tidying up of online assets ahead of Tuesday’s special event.

Rumors about Apple migrating away from the Beats brand have surfaced since the high-priced acquisition took place, but so far the brand has been maintained and expanded upon by Apple.

One possible reason for its removal could be Apple’s preparation to launch the “AirPods Studio,” a pair of premium over-ear headphones that are rumored to provide AirPods Pro features in a more luxurious package. Thought to be

Epic Won’t Get Immediate Access To App Store

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A federal judge Friday (Oct.9) denied a request by Epic Games to make Apple reinstate Epic’s Fortnite game on its App Store before a lawsuit Epic brought against Apple is resolved at trial, according to The Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

Epic sued Apple in August, accusing the technology giant of violating laws that restrict anti-competitive behavior. The suit, filed in federal court for the Northern District of California, alleges Apple has harmed both game-makers and payment processors and asks the court to compel Apple to grant easier access to the App Store.

Apple denied the allegations.

With the case grinding its way toward a scheduled May 2021 trial, Epic in August asked the court to issue a preliminary injunction making Apple open the App Store to Fortnite on a temporary basis. To prevail, Epic had to show both that it would suffer irreparable harm without an injunction and that it stood a good chance of prevailing at trial.

Friday’s ruling by U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers denying Epic’s request for immediate access to the app store means Epic will lose the valuable channel to customers until Apple decides to admit Fornite to the store or loses at trial.

“Given the novelty and the magnitude of the issues, as well as the debate in both the academic community and society at large, the Court is unwilling to tilt the playing field in favor of one party or the other with an early ruling of likelihood of success on the merits,” Rogers wrote.

She also noted that Epic chose to breach its agreement with Apple with the result that Apple excluded Fortnite from the App Store.

WSJ quoted David Hoppe, a technology and media lawyer at Gamma Law in San Francisco who is not

Antitrust investigation dubs App Store a monopoly, Microsoft adopts ‘app fairness’ rules, pandemic boosts Q3 app revenues

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Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the TechCrunch series that recaps the latest OS news, the applications they support and the money that flows through it all.

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The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 204 billion downloads and $120 billion in consumer spending in 2019. People are now spending three hours and 40 minutes per day using apps, rivaling TV. Apps aren’t just a way to pass idle hours — they’re a big business. In 2019, mobile-first companies had a combined $544 billion valuation, 6.5x higher than those without a mobile focus.

In this series, we help you keep up with the latest news from the world of apps, delivered on a weekly basis.

Apple declared monopoly by U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust

Apple was one of the four big tech companies the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust declared as having enjoyed monopoly power in the U.S. The report suggests that Congress make changes to break up their businesses. In Apple’s case, the company was deemed to have market power in the app distribution business, meaning its App Store. The report agrees that while the App Store provides significant benefits to both consumers and developers, Apple has also controlled the App Store in a way that allows it to create barriers to competition and exploits developer data to its advantage.

Apple responded that it “vehemently” disagrees with the report’s conclusions…”with respect to Apple.”:

Our company does not have a dominant market share in any category where we do business. From its beginnings 12 years ago with just 500 apps, we’ve built the App Store to be a safe and trusted place for users to discover and download apps and a supportive way for developers to create and sell apps globally. Hosting close