NASA animation tracks the end of Tropical Storm Delta

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NASA animation tracks the end of Tropical Storm Delta  
NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image to forecasters of Tropical Storm Delta moving through the southeastern U.S. on Oct. 11 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. At the time of the image, the storm was centered over northern Alabama. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).

NASA’s Terra satellite obtained visible imagery as Tropical Storm Delta made landfall in Louisiana and moved northeastward soaking the U.S. southeast and Mid-Atlantic states.


NASA satellite view: Delta’s organization

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Delta on Oct. 11 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. The storm still appeared circular in imagery. At the time, it was centered over northern Alabama. At the time Terra passed overhead, Delta had weakened to a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 25 mph (35 kph).

Visible imagery from NASA’s Terra satellite captured from Oct. 9 to Oct. 12 were compiled into an animation. The animation showed the landfall and movement of Tropical Storm Delta. Delta dissipated over the southeastern U.S. and its remnants moved into the Atlantic states. The animation was created using NASA’s Worldview product at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Delta’s landfall on Oct. 9

National Weather Service Doppler radar imagery, Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft data, and surface observations indicated on Oct. 9 that Delta made landfall near Creole, Louisiana, around 7 p.m. EDT with estimated maximum sustained winds of 100 mph (155 kph). Delta was a category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

NASA animation tracks the end of Tropical Storm Delta
This animation of visible imagery from NASA Terra satellite shows the landfall and movement of Tropical Storm Delta from Oct. 9 to Oct. 12. Delta dissipated over the southeastern U.S. and its remnants moved into the Atlantic

U.S. Department Of Justice Reveals Growing Bitcoin And Crypto National Security Threat Could Herald ‘Oncoming Storm’

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Bitcoin and cryptocurrency use by terrorists, rogue nations and other criminals has grown in recent years—with high-profile attacks drawing international attention.

The illicit use of bitcoin and cryptocurrency ranges from money laundering and tax evasion to extortion, with cyber criminals increasingly demanding bitcoin and crypto payments in ransomware attacks on computer systems.

Now, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has warned the emergence of bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies is a growing threat to U.S. national security, with the attorney general William Barr’s Cyber-Digital Task Force calling it the “first raindrops of an oncoming storm.”

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“Current terrorist use of cryptocurrency may represent the first raindrops of an oncoming storm of expanded use,” the Cyber-Digital Task Force said in a report that found bitcoin and cryptocurrencies pose an emerging challenge to law enforcement activities. “Cryptocurrency also provides bad actors and rogue nation states with the means to earn profits.”

The DOJ report, titled Cryptocurrency: An Enforcement Framework and published by the Attorney General’s Cyber-Digital Task Force last week, found bitcoin and cryptocurrencies have been used to support terrorism, purchase illicit items, conduct blackmail and extortion, cryptojacking and launder funds.

Investigators also said bitcoin and cryptocurrencies could be “detrimental to the safety and stability of the international financial system.”

The response of U.S. and international law enforcement has been held back by inconsistent regulation country-to-country. The DOJ has spent the last two years determining how best to address these issues, according to the document that “outlines the Department’s response strategies.”

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NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Chan-hom’s skewed structure

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NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Chan-hom's skewed structure
On Oct. 5, 2020, NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Chan-hom several hundred miles northwest of Guam (lower right). Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).

NASA’s Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Chan-hom as it continued moving though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The imagery revealed that the center of circulation was exposed and its strongest storms were south of the center.


Tropical Depression 16W formed on Oct. 4 and strengthened into a tropical storm on Oct 5. Once it reached tropical storm strength, it was re-named Chan-hom. Laos submitted the name Chan-hom to the World Meteorological Organization list. The name is a type of tree in Laos.

NASA satellite view: Chan-hom’s organization

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Chan-hom on Oct. 5 that showed a couple of things were occurring in the storm. First, bands of thunderstorms were wrapping into a partially exposed low-level circulation center. Second, there was building convection and thunderstorms occurring over the southern quadrant of the storm, giving it an appearance of a backwards letter “C” on satellite imagery. The storm is expected to strengthen over the next three days and when it does, it will likely develop a more circular shape.

The satellite imagery was created using NASA’s Worldview product at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Chan-hom’s status on Oct. 5

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Oct. 5, Chan-hom was centered near latitude 23.0 degrees north and longitude 139.2 degrees east. That is about 738 miles south of Yokosuka, Japan. Chan-hom is moving north and has maximum sustained winds of 35 knots (40 mph/64 kph).

Chan-hom’s forecast

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted, “Chan-hom

Tropical Storm Gamma moves inland over Yucatan Peninsula

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Oct. 3 (UPI) — Tropical Storm Gamma began moving inland over the Yucatan Peninsula on Saturday morning, less than a day after the storm was named.

Tropical Depression 25 formed late Friday morning amid an area of disturbed weather over the northwestern Caribbean that meteorologists have had their eyes on since the demise of Beta, Sally, Teddy and Paulette. It strengthened to tropical storm status — 40 mph — by Friday evening.

As of 1 p.m. CDT, the tropical storm was moving in a northwestward direction at 9 mph, about 15 miles north-northwest of Tulum, Mexico. Wind speeds had increased to 70 mph.

Mexico’s government has issued tropical storm and hurricane watches and warnings for the region.

Waters offshore of Honduras, Guatemala, Belize and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula have become increasingly stormy in recent days.

This zone has been experiencing low wind shear relative to the rest of the Atlantic basin. Wind shear is the increase in the speed of breezes at increasing elevation in the atmosphere and can also involve a sudden change in wind direction from one area to the next. Strong wind shear can inhibit tropical development or cause a developed tropical system to weaken.

When wind shear is weak as it is now over the northwestern Caribbean, warm waters and rising air can be enough to initiate tropical development.

AccuWeather is projecting the system to peak as a strong tropical storm before making landfall on the northeastern Yucatan coast Saturday afternoon. However, strengthening could resume and extend beyond tropical storm strength as the system gets into the southern Gulf of Mexico days later.

Because of weak steering breezes in the area from the northwestern Caribbean to the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, slow forward movement of this tropical system is likely to continue.

There are several scenarios that

Tropical Storm Gamma becomes latest named storm in Atlantic basin

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Tropical Storm Gamma became the 24th named storm in the Atlantic basin this season. Previously dubbed Tropical Depression 25, the system’s maximum sustained winds had strengthened to 40 mph by 7 p.m. PDT Friday.

Tropical Depression 25 formed late Friday morning amid an area of disturbed weather over the northwestern Caribbean that meteorologists have had their eyes on since the demise of Beta, Sally, Teddy and Paulette. The system had initially been dubbed Invest 91L by the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

As of Friday evening, the tropical storm was moving in a northwestward direction at 9 mph, about 135 miles south-southeast of Cozumel, Mexico.

Mexico’s government has issued a tropical storm warning for the country’s Yucatan Peninsula from the coastal communities of Punta Herrero to Cabo Catoche. A tropical storm watch has been issued for areas south of Punta Herrero to Puerto Costa Maya and west of Cabo Catoche to Dzilam, the NHC said.

Waters offshore of Honduras, Guatemala, Belize and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula have become increasingly stormy in recent days.

This zone has been experiencing low wind shear relative to the rest of the Atlantic basin. Wind shear is the increase in the speed of breezes at increasing elevation in the atmosphere and can also involve a sudden change in wind direction from one area to the next. Strong wind shear can inhibit tropical development or cause a developed tropical system to weaken.

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When wind shear is weak as it is now over the northwestern Caribbean, warm waters and rising air can be enough to initiate tropical development.

AccuWeather is projecting the system to peak as a strong tropical storm before moving over land this weekend. However, strengthening could resume and extend beyond tropical storm strength if the system gets into the