Wakashio Captain’s ‘Wifi’ Story In Doubt Following New Revelations In Mauritius Oil Spill Case

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The Indian Ocean island of Mauritius is still reeling from the devastating oil spill caused by the Panama-flagged, Japanese-owned vessel, The Wakashio. More questions are now being asked about the cause of the incident as the original claims start to unravel.

The first day that the Panama Maritime Authorities landed in Mauritius on September 8, they claimed that the captain had ordered a change of course to “find internet or a telephone signal.” 

While this captured many headlines, most in Mauritius were doubtful about this account, given that internet connectivity was easily available even 12 nautical miles off shore, where most vessels on the busy shipping lanes pass by the island.

Many tourists who travel to Mauritius (around 1 million a year), are able to access the internet many miles offshore on catamarans to share photos of themselves on several of the dolphin and whale watching tours or visits to the outlying islands of Mauritius.

Free, unlimited satellite internet available on ship

Such a story about the ‘search for Wi-Fi’ now appears to be even less credible given a statement from Wakashio operator, Mitsui OSK Lines to Forbes this week, that revealed that all crew on Mitsui OSK Lines (MOL) vessels have access to unlimited, free satellite internet while on board and at sea.

This means there was no need to be searching for any coastal internet connectivity or telephone signals, given this was a MOL-operated vessel.

In a statement to Forbes on October 6, a spokesperson for MOL said “Our fleet has the most

The CRISPR story: How basic research discovery changed science

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When Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier embarked on the project that would change science and medicine in incalculable ways, their intentions were much more muted. Theirs was a basic research inquiry into bacterial immune systems, not an attempt to develop a new tool to manipulate the genetic code.

Yet their discovery of the CRISPR-Cas9 editing complex, recognized Wednesday with the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has ignited what even scientists allergic to hyperbole routinely call a revolution in how science is conducted. Researchers and companies are regularly discovering new applications in agriculture, diagnostics, and therapeutic development.

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Author John Rocco retells the true story of Apollo 11 with amazing art and science

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“How We Got to the Moon”, out today (Oct. 6) peels back the curtain to expose the true story of NASA’s Apollo program and how people from all walks of life worked together to accomplish the impossible.

The new children’s book, fully titled “How We Got to the Moon: The People, Technology, and Daring Feats of Science Behind Humanity’s Greatest Adventure” (Random House Children’s Books, 2020) and written and illustrated by New York Times bestselling author and illustrator John Rocco, who wrote and illustrated “Blackout” and illustrated the famed series “Percy Jackson,” goes on sale today (Oct. 6). 

The book takes an immersive approach to NASA’s “moonshot” Apollo program, exploring the science behind the Apollo 11 journey and introducing some of the people who made the first crewed moon landing possible. 

“I wanted to make a book that I would have loved as a kid as a kid … and even as an adult,” Rocco told Space.com. He marveled that NASA’s Apollo 11 team landed humans on the moon “with the lack of technology that we have today. And just kind of through sheer grit, determination and cleverness, figured out how to do this amazing thing.” 

Reading Apollo 11: The best new books about the US moon landings

Stretching all the way from Sputnik to the Apollo 11 launch, the book encompasses history, science and storytelling, Rocco said. In addition to exploring the history of the first moon landing and the people who made it happen, Rocco also wanted to give important scientific context for readers so that, by the end of the book, they had a real idea of how the moon landings were accomplished. The book visually explains concepts like gravity, how rockets launch, Newton’s laws of motion and more. 

While many of the scientific details of humanity’s

LRD is proud supporter of National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). > U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters > Story Article View

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CINCINNATI– (Oct. 1, 2020) – October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an observance tied to the Army’s commitment to a diverse and inclusive workforce. The theme, “Increasing Access and Opportunity,” promotes educating employees and hiring authorities about disability employment issues and celebrating the many and varied contributions of workers with disabilities.

“Emphasis should be on the point that people with disabilities are typically creative problem solvers; they must be able to navigate a world historically designed for people without disabilities,” noted Jennifer Sheehy, deputy assistant secretary, of the Army’s Office of Disability Employment Policy.

In 1945, Congress declared the first week of October “National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week.” In 1962, the word “physically” was dropped to include individuals with all types of disabilities. Congress expanded the week to a month in 1988 and changed the commemoration to National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

This year marks not only the 75th observance of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, but also the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Both milestones are being commemorated with a range of events and activities centered on the theme “Increasing Access and Opportunity.”

What can be done to promote increasing access and opportunity?

Army organizations can actively engage in activities demonstrating commitment to being a model employer of people with disabilities.  The human capital/human resources staff can actively work to increase the population of those with disabilities in applicant pools, implement hiring authorities that take disability into account (such as Schedule A hiring authority), and use the Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP) as a source for qualified interns for hire. The CIO/IT/G6 and Acquisitions/Contracting Office can ensure accessibility to all information and communication technology (ICT) in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act https://section508.gov/. A few additional ideas are described at https://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/ndeam/agencies.htm.

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Information Technology Laboratory employees win HENAAC awards > U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters > Story Article View

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Christine Lozano and Dr. Alicia Ruvinsky, both members of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Information Technology Laboratory team, were named winners of the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Association Conference (HENAAC) 2020 Great Minds in STEM award.

HENAAC’s annual awards have recognized America’s top engineers and scientists from the Hispanic community for the past 31 years. Lozano was named a STEM hero, while Ruvinsky was honored for professional achievement.

“When I was younger, I was introduced to a drafting class by a female architect,” said Lozano. “It was through this drafting class that I realized that my appreciation for art and creativity could go hand in hand with my strength in math. As I kept looking around, I had male engineering influences, who I am so thankful for because they nurtured my goals and desires, but I never really had a female STEM influence. One of my dreams is to be a mentor and influence to the next generation, especially minority women.

“So many girls are not encouraged to pursue STEM fields, especially within the Hispanic community,” continued Lozano. “I hope that through something like this award, I can be an influence and face to younger girls. Even now, I think of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her influence. I may not have as large a platform as Justice Ginsburg, but I hope to be an encouragement to my fellow female Latinas that it is possible to make it and succeed in STEM and that our ideas and voices are worth being heard.”

Lozano’s research has resulted in impactful technology that is saving time and money and helping preserve our nation’s navigation infrastructure. Her accomplishments are critical to ensuring that the life of our nation’s aging hydraulic structures is extended. Lozano is a dedicated team member who encourages