Vanderbilt’s Allied Health Taps Orbund for Student Information System – Press Release

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Cloud-based Administrative System Powers Up VUMC’s Allied Health Programs, Automates Admissions & Regulatory Compliance Reporting


OVERLAND PARK, Kan. – October 13, 2020 – (Newswire.com)

​On the heels of a rigorous two-year process, Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) has selected Orbund’s Einstein Student Information System (SIS) for its Allied Health program, Orbund LLC announced today. VUMC Center for Programs in Allied Health (CPiAH) expects to be fully implemented on Orbund’s enterprise administrative software in February 2021.

“We serve a rapidly growing segment of healthcare,” said Dr. Geoffrey Fleming, who oversaw the student information system project in his role as Vice President of Continuous Professional Development (Pediatric Critical Care). “Allied health programs like ours have particular demands in admissions, attendance and regulatory compliance.”

Part of Vanderbilt University Medical Center, CPiAH prepares its students for high demand, technical careers, such as diagnostic medical sonography, neurodiagnostic technology, nuclear medicine, and perfusion.

“Our faculty takes its commitment to transformative learning to heart,” said Ebony McHaskell, CPiAH’s interim director. “We sought an administrative technology that seems in sync with our mission and objectives. Orbund came forward with the necessary features built on a cloud-based system.”

“We see in CPiAH the excellence of Vanderbilt, combined with its own sense of urgency and purpose in healthcare,” said Arif Joarder, CEO of Orbund. “It is a great honor and responsibility to roll out our system, so that CPiAH and its students can quickly take advantage of what it has to offer.”

The implementation of Orbund’s Einstein product, an integrated system of portals for students, faculty and administrators, is currently underway at CPiAH. The easy to use interfaces and configurable design of Einstein enable an institution like CPiAH to put it into full use weeks or a few months—rather than many months or even years often required with its competitors’

Student unlocks bizarre secrets of a ticking time-bomb star — ScienceDaily

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While on COVID lockdown, a University of Sydney honours student has written a research paper on a star system dubbed one of the “exotic peacocks of the stellar world.”

Only one in a hundred million stars makes the cut to be classified a Wolf-Rayet: ferociously bright, hot stars doomed to imminent collapse in a supernova explosion leaving only a dark remnant, such as a black hole.

Rarest of all, even among Wolf-Rayets, are elegant binary pairs that, if the conditions are right, are able to pump out huge amounts of carbon dust driven by their extreme stellar winds. As the two stars orbit one another, the dust gets wrapped into a beautiful glowing sooty tail. Just a handful of these sculpted spiral plumes has ever been discovered.

The object of this study is the newest star to join this elite club, but it has been found to break all the rules.

“Aside from the stunning image, the most remarkable things about this star system is the way the expansion of its beautiful dust spiral left us totally stumped,” said Yinuo Han, who completed the research during his honours year in the School of Physics.

“The dust seems to have a mind of its own, floating along much slower than the extreme stellar winds that should be driving it.”

Astronomers stumbled across this conundrum when the system was discovered two years ago by a team led by University of Sydney Professor Peter Tuthill. This star system, 8000 light years from Earth, was named Apep after the serpentine Egyptian god of chaos.

Now Mr Han’s research, published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, confirms those findings and reveals Apep’s bizarre physics with unprecedented detail.

Applying high-resolution imaging techniques at the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope at Paranal in

Iranian government admission shows Trump right and Biden wrong on student visas | American Enterprise Institute

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The Trump administration’s efforts to restrict student visas from countries designated as state sponsors of terrorism might seem like common sense, but, like everything else in an election year, it has become fodder for the partisan meatgrinder. Late last month, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement published a rule change to end indefinite visas for enrolled students originating in countries where visitors often violated the terms of their visas, or countries that are state sponsors of terrorism. None of this, of course, would end the issuance of visas; rather, certain students would have to re-apply after two or four years.

Joe Biden has generally opposed any new controls on foreign students. “Across the world, people come to this country with unrelenting optimism and determination toward the future. They study here, innovate here, they make America who we are. Donald Trump doesn’t get that — we need a president who does,” Biden tweeted on July 7, against the backdrop of Trump administration attempts to restrict visas for those attending schools offering virtual-only learning. Many universities and international students believe Biden would reverse or refuse to enact Trump’s clamp-down on student visas.

Enter the National Iranian American Council, the Islamic Republic’s de facto lobby in the United States. In an over-the-top statement issued in response to the proposed end to open-ended student visas without the need for renewal, Jamal Abdi, the group’s executive director, wrote, “Donald Trump’s white-nationalist administration is once again demonstrating its zealous hostility toward immigrant communities, including the Iranian-American community. Give this administration more time, and there will be zero visas issued to Iranians and other Muslim and African nations.”

Put aside the fact that the new rules would not affect the many Muslim and African nations whose citizens do not surpass a 10% violation rate of the terms of

Tech worker pleads guilty in death of Utah college student

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FILE - In this July 1, 2019, file photo, Ashley Fine speaks during a vigil for Mackenzie Lueck at the university in Salt Lake City. A tech worker pleaded guilty Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, in the death of Lueck, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ayoola A. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

FILE – In this July 1, 2019, file photo, Ashley Fine speaks during a vigil for Mackenzie Lueck at the university in Salt Lake City. A tech worker pleaded guilty Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, in the death of Lueck, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ayoola A. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

AP

A tech worker pleaded guilty on Wednesday to strangling a Utah college student whose disappearance over a year ago sparked a search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard.

Ayoola A. Ajayi acknowledged he planned the death of 23-year-old Mackenzie Lueck, whom he met on a dating app and arranged to meet in a park. After they returned to his home, he bound and strangled her, then burned and hid her body while police and loved ones searched for her, his lawyer said in court.

Ajayi pleaded guilty to aggravated murder and desecration of a corpse in an agreement with prosecutors that removed the possibility of the death penalty. Prosecutors dropped charges of aggravated kidnapping and obstructing justice.

Ajayi also pleaded guilty to sexually abusing a different woman he met on a dating app. He is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said the guilty pleas allow Lueck’s parents to begin to get closure and a “measure of justice.” Gill said the family has asked for privacy.

Lueck has been remembered as a bubbly, nurturing person who belonged to a sorority and was a part-time senior at the University of Utah studying kinesiology and pre-nursing.

She

New Student uMap(TM) Technology Eases Frustrations in the “COVID Classroom” | News

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Recognizing the struggles and lack of engagement between students and educators during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, technology and training company Become Unmistakable has built the Student uMap™. Specifically designed for educators and students, the software helps students connect to each other and their teachers in the new “COVID classroom.” It allows students to safely share their enthusiasm and concerns while providing a platform for their teachers to track social and emotional health through the pandemic and beyond.

“When learning in a virtual or socially-distanced classroom, human connection becomes diluted,” said Danielle Bouwhuis, uMap™ manager and former 7th grade science teacher. “And although students can learn mathematics and language arts through online games or video conferencing, they are deprived of personal interactions with teachers and peers that help form healthy, long-lasting habits and behaviors.”

When developing the Student uMap™, Become Unmistakable interviewed clients and educators from a variety of grade levels and school districts to identify the most common thoughts and concerns on teaching during the pandemic.

“Between video calls, fewer prep hours and a new block schedule, it has become way more difficult to get to know my 120 students,” said Janneke Cole, 7th and 8th grade language arts teacher at Jenison Public Schools. “After the first month, I usually have developed a pretty good rapport with most of them. But this year, it’s been a challenge just to learn everyone’s names.”

Reporting features identify kids who may be struggling and privately collects information about personal worries; helping teachers connect emotionally with their students from a distance.

The goal of the Student uMap™ is to ease these common pains and frustrations of COVID in the classroom.

“We’ve seen that technology like Zoom or Microsoft Teams are