2021 Honda Accord reveal: Fresh style, more tech but no manual gearbox

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Bigger grilles are all the rage.


Honda

One of Roadshow’s favorite family sedans is getting a freshened look and a brace of new equipment. The 2021 Honda Accord bowed on Monday with slightly tweaked styling, more tech and a new trim level that will surely appeal to those shopping the popular Accord Sport variant. All in all, the updates should be much appreciated by those still interested in a vehicle with four doors and a trunk.

Every Accord trim gets a redesigned, wider grille that incorporates some new horizontal pieces to emphasize width. It’s definitely not a huge change, but it helps the Honda Sensing suite of driver-assist tech work even better, according to the automaker. LED headlights are also standard on Accord Sport and above, though those shopping the Accord Hybrid will need to splurge for at least the EX trim for the same lighting tech. Every Accord except the Sport trim gets a set of new wheels that I personally do not care for whatsoever and the Accord Hybrid Touring nabs its own unique set of wheels, while all other Hybrid models get blue accents to signify its fuel-sipping credentials; the hybrid powertrain returns an EPA-estimated 48 miles per gallon.

An 8.0-inch touchscreen is standard across the board now.


Honda

Inside, the already well-appointed cockpit now features an 8.0-inch touchscreen as standard and both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto also join the standard equipment list. Previously, the tech and larger screen were not available on the base LX trim. The more luxurious Accord EX-L and Touring trims go further and add wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, while the Accord Hybrid makes the wireless tech standard on the EX trim and above. Truly, the wireless versions make the system so much better to use, if you like using

Gender Differences In Learning Style Specific To Science, Technology, Engineering And Math – Stem

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There are gender differences in learning styles specific to science, math, engineering and technology (STEM) that teachers of these subjects should keep in mind when developing lesson plans and teaching in the classroom. First, overall, girls have much less experience in the hands-on application of learning principles in lab settings than boys. This could occur in the computer lab, the science lab, or the auto lab – the principle is the same for all of these settings – it requires an overall technology problem-solving schema, accompanied by use and manipulation of tools, and spatial relation skills that very few girls bring with them to the classroom on day one in comparison to boys.

Let’s look at some of the reasons why girls come to the STEM classroom with less of the core skills needed for success in this subject area. Overall, girls and boys play with different kinds of games in early childhood that provide different types of learning experiences. Most girls play games that emphasize relationships (i.e., playing house, playing with dolls) or creativity (i.e., drawing, painting). In contrast, boys play computer and video games or games that emphasize building (i.e., LEGO®), both of which develop problem-solving, spatial-relationship and hands-on skills.

A study of gender differences in spatial relations skills of engineering students in the U.S. and Brazil found that there was a large disparity between the skills of female and male students. These studies attributed female student’s lesser skills set to two statistically significant factors: 1) less experience playing with building toys and 2) having taken less drafting courses prior to the engineering program. Spatial relations skills are critical to engineering. A gender study of computer science majors at Carnegie-Mellon University (one of the preeminent computer science programs in the country) found that, overall, male students come equipped …