COVID-19 can survive on phone screens for 28 days in the dark, study suggests

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a hand holding a cell phone: Crystal Cox/Business Insider


© Crystal Cox/Business Insider
Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Research from Australia’s national science agency suggests that the COVID-19 virus can survive on smooth surfaces for 28 days at room temperature.
  • The study tested the virus on glass mobile phone screens, plastic and paper banknotes, and stainless steel.
  • Researchers kept these surfaces in the dark during the study. UV light has been shown to kill COVID-19.
  • Previous studies have suggested the virus lingers on these surfaces for seven days or less.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The COVID-19 virus can survive on phone screens for 28 days under laboratory conditions, longer than previously thought, new research from the Australian government’s science agency has found. 

Researchers tested the virus on smooth surfaces such as glass phone screens and paper banknotes. They kept them in the dark at room temperature, around 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit).

They found the virus could survive for just under a month in these conditions.

UV light has been shown to kill COVID-19 in previous research.

Video: Covid-19 virus can survive up to 28 days, scientists say (NBC News)

Covid-19 virus can survive up to 28 days, scientists say

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The findings of the study, conducted by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, were published on October 7 in Virology Journal.

Previous research suggested that SARS-Cov-2 survives on glass and bank notes for about two to three days, and lingers on plastic and stainless steel for six days at most. One study, published in The Lancet, suggested the virus suggests the virus can survive for seven days for stainless steel.

In the latest study, the virus did not survive on porous materials such as cloth past a 14-day period. In comparison, the flu virus can survive on these surfaces in

Study Suggests A Supernova Exploded Near Earth About 2.5 Million Years Ago, Possibly Causing An Extinction Event

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Supernovas are amazingly bright explosions of massive stars at the end of their lives. During the gravitational collapse, the outer layers of the star are pushed away, and chemical elements formed inside the dying star are released into space. This cosmic dust rains down onto the Earth continuously, eventually becoming part of sediments deposited in the sea.

Research published in the journal Physical Review Letters used the concentrations of elements formed in an exploding star and preserved in oceanic sediments to hypothesize that a supernova exploded near Earth just 2.5 million years ago.

The authors, led by Dr. Gunther Korschinek from the Technical University of Munich, focused their study on ferromanganese crusts collected in the Pacific Ocean. Ferromanganese crusts form on the bottom of the ocean by layers of iron- and manganese-oxides precipitating out of seawater. The studied samples started to grow some 20 million years ago at depths ranging from 5,200 feet to 3.18 miles (approximately 1.600 to 5.120 meters). The researchers measured the concentrations of iron-60 and manganese-53 isotopes in the hardened crust. They differ from Earth’s most common form of the elements by their varying number of neutrons in the atomic nucleus. Both isotopes are synthesized in large stars shortly before supernova explosions and are unstable, decaying completely after 4 to 15 million years. Their presence in sediment samples is evidence for Earth passing through a cloud of cosmic dust generated by an exploding star in – geologically speaking – recent times.

New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe

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New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe
Artist’s illustration of supernova remnant Credit: Pixabay

In a recently published study, a team of researchers led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash university suggests an innovative method to analyse gravitational waves from neutron star mergers, where two stars are distinguished by type (rather than mass), depending on how fast they’re spinning.


Neutron stars are extremely dense stellar objects that form when giant stars explode and die—in the explosion, their cores collapse, and the protons and electrons melt into each other to form a remnant neutron star.

In 2017, the merging of two neutron stars, called GW170817, was first observed by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. This merger is well-known because scientists were also able to see light produced from it: high-energy gamma rays, visible light, and microwaves. Since then, an average of three scientific studies on GW170817 have been published every day.

In January this year, the LIGO and Virgo collaborations announced a second neutron star merger event called GW190425. Although no light was detected, this event is particularly intriguing because the two merging neutron stars are significantly heavier than GW170817, as well as previously known double neutron stars in the Milky Way.

Scientists use gravitational-wave signals—ripples in the fabric of space and time—to detect pairs of neutron stars and measure their masses. The heavier neutron star of the pair is called the ‘primary’; the lighter one is ‘secondary’.

The recycled-slow labelling scheme of a binary neutron star system

A binary neutron star system usually starts with two ordinary stars, each around ten to twenty times more massive than the Sun. When these massive stars age and run out of ‘fuel’, their lives end in supernova explosions that leave behind compact remnants, or neutron stars. Each remnant neutron star weighs around

Study Suggests COVID-19 Can Survive For 28 Days On A Smartphone

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In some concerning news, a new study has found that COVID-19 can survive for up to 28 days on a smartphone screen. This news comes from a study in Virology Journal which has reinforced the need for regular cleaning of devices and handwashing in the fight against the disease.

Some smartphone manufactures were alert to the threat of coronavirus surviving on screens before this study released. Samsung recently patented something called ‘Antimicrobial Coating’. The thought is that the company will produce smartphone cases designed to fight the virus.

Additionally, successful tests have been conducted of UV Light-based robots designed to kill coronavirus. These have sold to a number of healthcare settings to try and help combat the disease more effectively.

The new research, however, is still quite worrying. As reported by ZDNet it underlies the importance of maintaining good hygiene habits surrounding surface and device cleaning as the virus continues to spread.

New study makes worrying reading for coronavirus survival

The fact that COVID-19 can survive for up to 28 days on a smartphone screen is quite worrying for most. Given many have probably slipped into bad habits surrounding device and surface cleaning this should serve as a reminder.

The specifics of the study demonstrated that the virus can last for up to a month on the glass when kept at an ambient temperature and humidity. This also applies to stainless steel, and both paper and polymer banknotes.

The paper stated, “touchscreen devices may provide a potential source of transmission, and should regularly be disinfected especially in multi-user environments”.

Previous studies had indicated that the virus could last for just a few days on these sorts of surfaces. This was still worrying given how many people may touch these surfaces in that time. However, this new study suggests an even

New Theory Suggests Tunguska Explosion Was A 656 Foot-Wide Asteroid’s Near-Miss With Earth

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On the morning of June 30, 1908, the ground trembled in Central Siberia, and a series of flying fireballs, causing a “frightful sound” of explosions, were observed in the sky above the Stony Tunguska River. Strange glowing clouds, colorful sunsets, and a weak luminescence in the night were reported as far as Europe.

Likely many thousand people in a radius of 1.500 kilometers (or 900 miles) observed the Tunguska Event. However, due to the remoteness of the affected area, eyewitness testimonies were collected only more than half of a century after the event, and most were second-hand oral accounts. In 2008, unpublished material collected by Russian ethnographer Sev’yan Vainshtein resurfaced, including some first-hand accounts of the event.

Despite its notoriety in pop-culture, hard scientific data covering the Tunguska Event is sparse. Since 1928 more than forty expeditions have explored the site, taking samples from the soil, rocks, and even trees flattened by the explosion, with ambiguous results. Some seismic and air-pressure wave registrations, recorded immediately after the blast, survive to this day and surveys of the devastated forest mapped some thirty years later. The explosion was powerful enough to flatten more than 80 million trees.

Based on the lack of hard data, like a crater or a meteorite, and conflicting accounts, many theories of widely varying plausibility were proposed over time.

At the time of the event, international newspapers speculated about a volcanic eruption. Russian scientists, like Dr. Arkady Voznesensky, Director of the Magnetographic and Meteorological Observatory at Irkutsk, speculated about