Creating Resilience In Oil And Gas Supply Chains With Technology

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The Covid-19 pandemic has everyone rethinking what steps to take for resilience today, and how to safeguard that resilience for an uncertain energy future. Nearly every oil and gas executive said, in the just released EY Oil and Gas Digital Transformation and the Workforce Survey, that their company will have to change how it operates coming out of the downturn. What’s implied by that result is that oil and gas executives don’t expect the market to ever go back to where it was.

They are right. Oil demand is unlikely to return to the path it was on before the pandemic. New ways of living, working and operating our day-to-day lives have taken hold and are likely to permanently transform traditional choices. When we get to the other side of the pandemic, electric vehicles may be more prevalent and more electricity may come from renewable sources. Capacity across the value chain was sized to meet everyone’s old views. The disconnect between supply and demand will be here for some time and will drive down returns and force transformation.

There are three key themes for oil and gas companies to consider as they transform. First, they will have to allocate capital to reflect their strategic ambitions to decarbonize and achieve net zero. Second, they will have to integrate technology platforms to enable data-driven decision-making capabilities. Third, they will need to enter collaborative ecosystems and understand how organizations (both internal and external) disrupt and enable each other. All of these actions must also provide healthy returns on investment, something the industry has struggled to do over the last few years.

While capital allocation continues to be top of

‘Two Screens for Teachers’ to supply extra monitors in Seattle and puts out call for help in other cities

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The two-screen setup of an elementary school teacher in Seattle. (Photo courtesy of Two Screens for Teachers)

Remote teaching is about to get a little bit easier for thousands of teachers in Seattle Public Schools. The nonprofit organization “Two Screens for Teachers” announced Tuesday that it’s purchasing a second computer monitor for every teacher who needs one, and plans to deliver about 3,000 monitors at a value of around $430,000.

Started by a small group of Seattle startup veterans, Two Screens for Teachers aims to boost teacher productivity through added technology, helping to make remote instruction less stressful during the ongoing pandemic.

Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu are behind the idea. They previously co-founded Walk Score, a Seattle startup that sold to Redfin in 2014. Their hope is that their latest cause will spread beyond Seattle and they can inspire techies in other cities to purchase monitors for the thousands of teachers who need them.

PREVIOUSLY: Seattle startup vets launch ‘Two Screens for Teachers’ effort to help improve remote instruction

“I’ve spent my career in tech on two screens and can’t imagine working without them,” Lerner said in a news release. “During the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve asked our teachers to become tech experts, on top of doing the crucial job of educating our children. A second screen lets teachers see their students on one screen and their lesson plans on the other. This is a simple productivity solution that people in tech centers like Seattle take for granted.”

“Having two monitors is incredibly helpful for teaching,” Seattle elementary school teacher Jannah H. said. “I use my second monitor to display my lesson plans and weekly schedule. I also sometimes use it to keep the video of my student’s faces open while I open a lesson powerpoint on my computer.”

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Hurricanes, heavy rains are critical for Hawai’i’s groundwater supply — ScienceDaily

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Located within the most isolated archipelago in the world, Hawai’i is critically dependent on a clean, ample supply of fresh water. New research led by University of Hawai’i at M?noa scientists indicates that rain brought to the islands by hurricanes and Kona storms can often be the most important precipitation for re-supplying groundwater in many regions of the island of O’ahu.

“The majority of Hawai’i’s freshwater comes from groundwater,” said Daniel Dores, lead author and groundwater and geothermal researcher in the UH M?noa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology. “In this study, we investigated the relationship between trade wind showers, major rainfall events like Kona storms, and groundwater.”

Dores and a team of scientists from SOEST and the Hawai’i Department of Health collected rainfall around the island of Oahu and analyzed the stable isotopes of rainwater, chemical signatures in the water molecules. They compared the chemical signatures in rainwater to those of groundwater to determine the source of water in the aquifers — event-based rainfall or trade wind-related rain.

“Because windward and mauka showers are so common, it is easy to assume that is the main source of our drinking water,” said Dores. “Also, large rainfall events such as Kona storms result in significant runoff into the oceans. However, our research found that a lot of the rain from Kona storms makes it into our groundwater aquifers and is an important source of our drinking water.”

Hawai’i is experiencing substantial changes in trade wind weather patterns, and precipitation events could become more extreme. Some of the study co-authors will continue research to understand more about local and regional groundwater recharge and water quality.

“By better understanding how our groundwater is impacted by these extreme precipitation events, we can better protect the resource itself,” said Dores.

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Radix Technology Fuels Growth for Pro-Frotas’ 100% Digital Fuel Supply Management Solution

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HOUSTON, Oct. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Pro-Frotas, a 100% digital fuel supply management start-up created in partnership with Ipiranga, is growing its operations with technology developed by Radix Engineering and Software. Ipiranga, a subsidiary of Ultra, is the largest private player in the Brazilian fuel distribution market, with nationwide coverage and a network of approximately 7,200 service stations.

Pro-Frotas was conceived with the purpose of reinventing the fleet refueling business, with technology that would supply 100% digital, free supply management and payment. Pro-Frotas contracted Radix, IIOT digital transformation experts, to create an application and web portal for management and control of fueling.

“The Pro-Frotas project was challenging from the start, in terms of both team and deadline. In order to develop a completely innovative product in the transportation market, we had to condense timelines. We created deliverables on short notice that provided a simple and reliable interface for the customer. To do this, we had to have a very engaged multidisciplinary team. Besides that, Radix began the project in 2016, and it was the first large-scale use of an agile methodology,” says Thiago Fernandes, project manager at Radix.

This innovative solution is composed of an app for filling stations and a portal for management and supply control, ensuring a safer, more reliable experience for drivers and managers.

Deployment and financial success were quickly achieved. In its first semester of operations (2019), Pro-Frotas had more than 5,000 downloads of its application, registered an average of more than 20,000 transactions per month, and expanded the network of accredited service stations to more than 600 units. Today, a year later, there are almost 7000 vehicles from 350 fleets, accumulating more than 32,000 transactions per month.

To suit different types of users – drivers, fleet managers and gas stations –

Solar the new ‘king of electricity’ as renewables make up bigger slice of supply: IEA

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PARIS (Reuters) – Solar output is expected to lead a surge in renewable power supply in the next decade, the International Energy Agency said, with renewables seen accounting for 80% of growth in global electricity generation under current conditions.

FILE PHOTO: A photovoltaic solar panel farm is seen in Porto Feliz, Sao Paulo state, Brazil February 13, 2020. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli/File Photo

In its annual World Energy Outlook on Tuesday, the IEA said in its central scenario – which reflects policy intentions and targets already announced – renewables are expected to overtake coal as the primary means of producing electricity by 2025.

The combined share of solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind in global generation will rise to almost 30% in 2030 from 8% in 2019, it said, with solar PV capacity growing by an average 12% a year.

“I see solar becoming the new king of the world’s electricity markets,” IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol said. “Based on today’s policy settings, it is on track to set new records for deployment every year after 2022.”

Maturing technology and support mechanisms have cut financing costs for major solar PV projects, the IEA said, helping to bring down output costs overall. Solar PV is now cheaper than new coal- or gas-fired power plants in most countries, it said.

Power generation from renewables is the only major source of energy that continued to grow in 2020, the Paris-based agency added.

A more ambitious scenario, including for instance the adoption of net-zero emissions targets by 2050, would see PV electricity generation perform more strongly still, the report said.

Despite the increase in solar and wind power, carbon emissions are projected to pick up in 2021 after a 2.4 gigatonne (Gt) drop in 2020, and to exceed 2019 levels in 2027 before growing to 36 Gt