Why Investors Should Focus More On The Infrastructure Supporting The AI Revolution

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Guest Post by Basil Alomary

AI has been heralded as the catalyst for a new industrial revolution. While the potential for massive impact is very real, venture investors looking to capitalize on growth ought to spend more time considering the enabling infrastructure.

Although applications are myriad and diverse, from drug discovery to driverless cars, practical adoption in the enterprise has been lackluster. Only 1 in 20 business leaders would describe their companies as “implementing AI widely across the organization.” 


The starting point for identifying these investment opportunities is the deconstruction of the AI workflow—extracting each step in the process, from aggregation to deployment and seeking efficiency, scale and access.


An infrastructure-first approach to investing has the potential to yield greater venture returns with a lower risk profile. Looking at the smartphone market, for example, it’s unlikely that an investor in 2005 could have accurately projected that today Google, an internet search engine, would have a mobile business that is 5x larger than Nokia’s. That said, making broad investments in major chip manufacturers would have accurately identified Qualcomm as being a provider whose parts have supported the rise in mobile technology. 

Innovations in AI are exciting, but it’s less difficult to identify and bet on, the technologies supporting AI rather than predicting who will provide the voice assistant of the future. The starting point for identifying these investment opportunities is the deconstruction of the AI workflow—extracting each step in the process, from aggregation to deployment and seeking efficiency, scale and access.

What does it mean to operationalize AI?

The process

CyberSaint Launches Updates Supporting Financial Services Sector Cybersecurity Compliance and Risk Management Initiatives

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New CyberStrong platform updates allow customers to quickly align with the Financial Services Sector Cybersecurity Profile and harmonize compliance standards across FFIEC, NIST, PCI, and others supported by patented automation.

CyberSaint, the developer of the leading platform for automated, intelligent cybersecurity program management, today announced the availability of new features supporting the Financial Services Sector Cybersecurity Profile within the CyberStrong platform, including automated mappings between those standards and the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, FFIEC, and others. These updates are supported by CyberSaint’s existing patented technology, which is used to optimize program performance and eliminate manual intervention for assessments, remediation, and reporting.

The Financial Services Sector Coordinating Council (FSSCC) cybersecurity profile was created by the Bank Policy Institute (BPI), leading organizations, and institutions to fulfill the need for a more efficient, tailored, and easily communicated framework to leverage across the financial services sector. The profile is designed for all financial services organizations from banking, asset management, broker-dealers, insurance, to market utilities. CyberSaint’s update was shaped in part by feedback from the BPI and some of the world’s largest and most innovative financial services, payment, and banking organizations. CyberSaint’s CyberStrong platform supports various risk and compliance program use cases, allowing customers to build cybersecurity resilience from assessment to boardroom. The platform scales to support extensive cyber risk transformation projects undergone by Fortune 100 customers while also meeting the needs of regional banks and credit unions’ continuous assessment, risk, compliance, and audit programs. This flexibility and agility, paired with a robust and visionary feature set, is a fundamental reason why CyberSaint has been named a key competitor in the integrated risk management market.

“CyberSaint’s vision is a key reason why partnering with the team is so exciting for us,” stated Kerri Keller, Consulting Risk Leader and Senior Manager at EY. “For our