Study shows surge of emergency room visits since introduction of rideshare e-scooters — ScienceDaily

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A Henry Ford Health System physician is sounding the alarm on the rising number of injuries caused from riding electric scooters, calling it a growing public health concern.

In a study of e-scooter injuries, Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., chair of the Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, says a review of emergency visits in the last three years shows e-scooter injuries have increased significantly with many of them related to head and neck injuries. The study describes how the types of injuries which include concussions, fractures, contusions and abrasions, lacerations and internal organ injuries have changed since the introduction of e-scooter rideshare systems to the public in September 2017.

The study’s break down on the type of injuries shows that head and neck injuries made up nearly 28% of the total injuries. Results were also broken down by age groups and showed that from 2009 to 2017, patients who were 17 years old or younger made up the most injured age group. After 2017, the demographic of 18-to-44-year-olds became the most injured age group, which suggests that e-scooter injuries occur predominantly with older users.

“I’ve seen riders not wearing helmets, two or three riders on one e-scooter recklessly weaving in and out of traffic. The numbers of injuries we’re seeing should be a wake-up call about the safety risks of riding these modes of transportation,” says Dr. Yaremchuk, the study’s senior author.

Results of Henry Ford’s retrospective study were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology.

The Henry Ford research team found that since the introduction of rideshare e-scooters, motorized vehicles that can reach speeds of up to 35 miles per hour, injuries have increased as more people gravitate to the inexpensive and convenient form of transportation used mostly in crowded urban centers.

“We hope

TSMC Leads Chipmakers’ Sales Surge Ahead of New iPhones

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(Bloomberg) — Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. reported a stronger-than-expected 22% rise in quarterly sales, buoyed by orders from its largest customers including Apple Inc.

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The world’s largest contract chipmaker saw revenue for the three months to September climb to a record NT$356.4 billion ($12.4 billion), up from NT$293 billion a year earlier, according to Bloomberg calculations based on monthly sales data disclosed by TSMC. Fellow Taiwanese chipmakers United Microelectronics Corp. and MediaTek Inc. on Thursday also reported strong sales, suggesting a broad recovery in the industry.

TSMC in July raised its 2020 outlook, saying that revenue this year will grow by more than 20% in dollar terms. Sales for the first nine months of the year suggests that Apple’s main iPhone chipmaker is on track to meet its growth forecast as the Covid-19 pandemic fueled demand for home computing equipment.

The company’s business typically revs up in the months before Apple unveils new iPhones and the holiday season. It also likely received a boost during the quarter as its second-largest customer Huawei Technologies Co. raced to stockpile supplies before a U.S. ban on shipments to the Chinese telecom giant came into effect last month. Rival chipmaker Samsung Electronics Co. reported on Thursday earnings that beat analyst estimates after its mobile and chip businesses benefited from the curbs on Huawei.



chart, pie chart: Market Leader


© Bloomberg
Market Leader

“The demand strength will sustain and see an upside risk to TSMC’s 4Q20 revenue guidance to be announced next week,” Bernstein analysts led by Mark Li wrote in a note. “The ramp of iPhone is delayed but just makes 4Q20 sequentially stronger. Apple silicon is ramping and will fuel the momentum in 4Q20 too. More recently, Huawei’s competitors are aggressive in placing orders, all vying to gain the share left by Huawei.”

Monthly figures released

Samsung likely to post 35% surge in third-quarter profit as smartphone sales recover

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Video: DAX Owner Mulls Bigger Index, New Rules (Bloomberg)

DAX Owner Mulls Bigger Index, New Rules

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By Joyce Lee



a person holding a sign: FILE PHOTO: The logo of Samsung Electronics is seen at its office building in Seoul


© Reuters/KIM HONG-JI
FILE PHOTO: The logo of Samsung Electronics is seen at its office building in Seoul

SEOUL (Reuters) – Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s September-quarter profit likely surged more than a third, fuelled by strong smartphone sales and a rush order of memory chips from Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL], analysts said.

Samsung, the world’s biggest memory chip supplier, is scheduled to announce preliminary July-September operating profit and revenue on Thursday.

Profit likely rose 35% to 10.5 trillion won (£7.04 billion) from the same period a year earlier, according to Refinitiv SmartEstimate, derived from analyst estimates weighted toward those more consistently accurate. Revenue likely rose 3%.

While Samsung’s overall chip business was muted, analysts said orders from Chinese smartphone maker Huawei likely propped up sales. Huawei is likely to have built stockpiles before U.S. sanctions from mid-September prevented it from buying chips made using U.S. technology without a license, analysts said.

Last year Samsung’s chip business accounted for roughly half of its profit.

U.S. rival Micron Technology Inc posted market-beating profit last month, likely helped by Huawei’s rush to secure inventory, analysts said.

“Huawei’s emergency orders from late August drove up Samsung’s DRAM and NAND chip shipments, offsetting the effect of weak prices and limiting the drop in semiconductor profits for the quarter,” said analyst Song Myung-sup at HI Investment & Securities.

Prices of DRAM chips, which allow devices to multi-task, and of NAND chips, which store data, fell in July-September, showed DRAMeXchange data.

Samsung’s smartphone profit, which accounted for one-third of earnings last year, likely jumped as handset demand rebounded after the COVID-19 pandemic curbed sales in the first half of 2020. Third-quarter smartphone

Samsung likely to post 35per cent surge in third-quarter profit as smartphone sales recover

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Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s September-quarter profit likely surged more than a third, fuelled by strong smartphone sales and a rush order of memory chips from Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, analysts said.

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Samsung Electronics is seen at its office building in Seoul

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Samsung Electronics is seen at its office building in Seoul. Picture taken January 7, 2019. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji/File Photo

SEOUL: Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s September-quarter profit likely surged more than a third, fuelled by strong smartphone sales and a rush order of memory chips from Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, analysts said.

Samsung, the world’s biggest memory chip supplier, is scheduled to announce preliminary July-September operating profit and revenue on Thursday.

Profit likely rose 35per cent to 10.5 trillion won (US$9.07 billion) from the same period a year earlier, according to Refinitiv SmartEstimate, derived from analyst estimates weighted toward those more consistently accurate. Revenue likely rose 3per cent.

While Samsung’s overall chip business was muted, analysts said orders from Chinese smartphone maker Huawei likely propped up sales. Huawei is likely to have built stockpiles before U.S. sanctions from mid-September prevented it from buying chips made using U.S. technology without a license, analysts said.

Last year Samsung’s chip business accounted for roughly half of its profit.

U.S. rival Micron Technology Inc posted market-beating profit last month, likely helped by Huawei’s rush to secure inventory, analysts said.

“Huawei’s emergency orders from late August drove up Samsung’s DRAM and NAND chip shipments, offsetting the effect of weak prices and limiting the drop in semiconductor profits for the quarter,” said analyst Song Myung-sup at HI Investment & Securities.

Prices of DRAM chips, which allow devices to multi-task, and of NAND chips, which store data, fell in July-September, showed DRAMeXchange data.

Samsung’s smartphone profit, which

Will coronavirus surge in the winter? Experts don’t know yet

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About 2,400 years ago, the Greek physician Hippocrates made a startling discovery: A respiratory disease known as the “Cough of Pernithus” appeared to come and go with the seasons, causing influenza-like outbreaks in ancient Greece in the wintertime before subsiding for much of the rest of the year.

Hippocrates’ observations became the earliest known reference to the seasonal nature of an infectious disease. Since then, scientists have noted numerous other diseases that peak in certain seasons — measles in the spring and influenza in the winter, for instance. Now, as the coronavirus continues to spread around the world, researchers are eager to learn whether it will follow a seasonal cycle.

So far, there’s no firm evidence that environmental conditions tied to the changing seasons have any influence on the transmissibility of Covid-19. Yet health officials have warned that a second wave could be looming as the Northern Hemisphere inches into fall and winter and cold weather drives people indoors, where the risks of spreading the virus are greater.

Experts say it’s too soon to know whether, like influenza, the coronavirus will peak in the winter. And even for diseases that are known to come and go with the seasons, the reasons are still something of a mystery. In general, they said, the seasonality of infectious diseases is a question without an easy answer. But for countries bracing for the coming months of the pandemic, it’s one that has enormous consequences for public health.

“We really don’t understand a lot about seasonality,” said Dr. Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology and global public health at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “We are much better at knowing what viruses do than why they do it.”

Because the coronavirus affects the respiratory system, it’s thought that it could behave similarly to