Alion Awarded $73 Million Task Order to Provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment Research and Development

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WASHINGTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Navy has awarded Alion Science and Technology a $73 million task order with a 60-month period of performance to provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment (JTSE) Research and Development (R&D) for Joint Staff J7, Deputy Director Joint Training (JS J7 DDJT) Environment Architecture Division (EAD). Alion was awarded this contract under the Department of Defense Information Analysis Center’s (DoD IAC) multiple-award contract (MAC) vehicle. These DoD IAC MAC task orders (TOs) are awarded by the U.S. Air Force’s 774th Enterprise Sourcing Squadron to develop and create new knowledge for the enhancement of the DTIC repository and the R&D and S&T community.

(PRNewsfoto/Alion Science and Technology Co)

“We are dedicated to our continued customer partnership to develop joint virtual environments to prepare for Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2),” said Katie Selbe, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Alion’s Cyber Network Solutions Group. “Alion has a deep understanding of the JTSE program and its requirements. Our team has been at the forefront of developing Joint Synthetic Training Environments for over 20 years and provides a seamless transition for on-going capability development.”

The JTSE is one of the critical enablers that supports the delivery of trained, capable, and interoperable Joint Forces. The scope of this effort includes providing a full range of application design, development, and integration efforts to modernize the technical architecture supporting joint forces training exercises. The architecture must enable the use of current technologies to assist with information management as well as an evolutionary transition from the Joint, Live, Virtual and Constructive (JLVC) Federation to a data-centric, web-based single digital environment that supports collaborative exercise planning and execution.

ABOUT DOD IAC PROGRAM

The DoD IAC program operates as a part of Defense Technical Information Center and provides technical data management and research

Nanoparticles with synthetic DNA can control release of active agents — ScienceDaily

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Medications often have unwanted side-effects. One reason is that they reach not only the unhealthy cells for which they are intended, but also reach and have an impact on healthy cells. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), working together with the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, have developed a stable nano-carrier for medications. A special mechanism makes sure the drugs are only released in diseased cells.

The human body is made up of billions of cells. In the case of cancer, the genome of several of these cells is changed pathologically so that the cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. The cause of virus infections is also found within the affected cells. During chemotherapy for example, drugs are used to try to destroy these cells. However, the therapy impacts the entire body, damaging healthy cells as well and resulting in side effects which are sometimes quite serious.

A team of researchers led by Prof. Oliver Lieleg, Professor of Biomechanics and a member of the TUM Munich School of BioEngineering, and Prof. Thomas Crouzier of the KTH has developed a transport system which releases the active agents of medications in affected cells only. “The drug carriers are accepted by all the cells,” Lieleg explains. “But only the diseased cells should be able to trigger the release of the active agent.”

Synthetic DNA keeps the drug carriers closed

The scientists have now shown that the mechanism functions in tumor model systems based on cell cultures. First they packaged the active ingredients. For this purpose, they used so-called mucins, the main ingredient of the mucus found for example on the mucus membranes of the mouth, stomach and intestines. Mucins consist of a protein background to which sugar molecules are docked. “Since mucins occur naturally in the body, opened mucin

Synthetic aperture radar finally shedding its mystique

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When Capella Space’s first operational synthetic aperture radar satellite launched from New Zealand last month on a Rocket Lab Electron, a team of agriculture specialists at The Climate Corporation watched with excitement.

“We were really happy,” said Steven Ward, the director of geospatial sciences at The Climate Corporation, a San Francisco-based subsidiary of life sciences and pharmaceutical giant Bayer that leverages satellite imagery to help farmers boost crop yields and insure against weather-driven losses. “We actually had a Slack channel where we were celebrating that launch.”

The Climate Corporation processed 600 million satellite images in 2019, most of it optical, Ward said. The company hasn’t integrated synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, imagery into its Climate FieldView product line yet, but is studying how radar, which can peer through clouds, could fill gaps left by optical satellites over notoriously cloudy regions like Brazil, Indonesia and the Niger delta, he said.

“We’re getting bits and pieces of the story of the field,” Ward said. “What adding SAR data into the mix does is it fills in the gaps. We’re missing chapters, and it’s filling in those chapters.”

The Climate Corporation integrates satellite imagery with other data sources, streaming mapped progress directly to computer-equipped farming machinery. Farmers are able to see and analyze the progress of planting, crop protection, and harvesting in real time using satellite imagery. Credit: The Climate Corporation

SAR satellites can gather data day and night, and through all weather conditions, but the resultant imagery is typically more expensive, less available, and more difficult to use than optical imagery.

Technological advances, as much on the ground as in space, are breaking down those barriers, positioning SAR for much more widespread adoption, according to experts.

“For the first time in history, the ground segment is ready, the cloud computing is ready,