Investors urge heavy carbon emitters to set science-based reduction targets

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FILE PHOTO: Cracked earth marks a dried-up area near a wind turbine used to generate electricity at a wind farm in Guazhou, 950km (590 miles) northwest of Lanzhou, Gansu Province September 15, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

LONDON (Reuters) – Investors managing around $20 trillion in assets on Tuesday called on the heaviest corporate emitters of greenhouse gases to set science-based targets on the way to net zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

AXA Group and Nikko Asset Management Co are among 137 investors urging 1,800 companies responsible for a quarter of global emissions to act, coordinated by non-profit group CDP.

While more companies are pledging their support for the 2015 Paris agreement on climate change, aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050, not all have been clear about how they will get there.

To help limit global warming to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial norms by 2050, companies need to set out their pathway to net zero and ensure it is consistent with the science and independently verified, the investors said.

“Climate change presents material risks to investments, and companies that are failing to set targets grounded in science risk losing out – and causing greater damage to the world economy,” said Emily Kreps, Global Director of Capital Markets at CDP.

The companies targeted together annually contribute 13.5 gigatonnes of emissions directly and indirectly tied to their operations, equivalent to 25% of the world’s total, CDP said.

Specifically, the investors said they wanted companies to set targets through the Science-Based Targets Initiative to help ensure the goals can be more easily compared and assessed.

More than 1,000 companies have already set science-based targets, of which around 300 have targets in line with the 1.5 degrees goal.

“Companies that do not set science-based targets risk being surprised by increased

Indonesia’s AC Ventures Targets New $80 Million Startup Fund

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(Bloomberg) — AC Ventures, an Indonesia-focused venture capital firm, said it completed the first close of a planned $80 million technology investment fund.



a crane next to a body of water with a city in the background: A crane stands at a construction site in this aerial photograph taken in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. Indonesia is scheduled to release fourth-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Feb. 6.


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A crane stands at a construction site in this aerial photograph taken in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. Indonesia is scheduled to release fourth-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Feb. 6.

The Jakarta-based company raised $56 million at the first close, according to its partners. The fund will invest in about 30 early-stage startups in areas including e-commerce and financial technology in the next three years.

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AC Ventures was established in 2019 after two homegrown Indonesian VC firms — Agaeti Ventures and Convergence Ventures — merged to create scale. Its three founding partners are Pandu Sjahrir and Michael Soerijadji, previously general partners of Agaeti Ventures, and Adrian Li, the former founder of Convergence Ventures. Together, they have backed more than 100 tech ventures.

The firm will have a strategic alliance with Indies Capital, an alternative asset manager with more than $600 million of assets under management where Sjahrir serves as a managing partner. One of its funds, Indies Pelago, invests in late-stage technology startups in Southeast Asia.

With the new fund, AC Ventures plans to make an initial investment of as much as $3 million in each startup. It has put money into companies such as logistics startup Kargo and BukuWarung, a bookkeeping app built for 60 million micro-merchants in the country.

“With AC Ventures, we can invest across the spectrum — from very early-stage, to growth and late-stage startups,” Sjahrir said in an interview. “The Covid-19 era has shown entrepreneurs with grit, and investment companies that can put capital to work.”

Read more: Singapore’s Indies Raises $100 Million for Third Asian Fund

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AC Ventures Targets New $80 Million Indonesian Startup Fund

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AC Ventures, an Indonesia-focused venture capital firm, said it completed the first close of a planned $80 million technology investment fund.

The Jakarta-based company raised $56 million at the first close, according to its partners. The fund will invest in about 30 early-stage startups in areas including e-commerce and financial technology in the next three years.

AC Ventures was established in 2019 after two homegrown Indonesian VC firms — Agaeti Ventures and Convergence Ventures — merged to create scale. Its three founding partners are Pandu Sjahrir and Michael Soerijadji, previously general partners of Agaeti Ventures, and Adrian Li, the former founder of Convergence Ventures. Together, they have backed more than 100 tech ventures.

relates to Indonesia’s AC Ventures Targets New $80 Million Startup Fund

From left to right: Michael Soerijadj, Pandu Sjahrir and Adrian Li.

The firm will have a strategic alliance with Indies Capital, an alternative asset manager with more than $600 million of assets under management where Sjahrir serves as a managing partner. One of its funds, Indies Pelago, invests in late-stage technology startups in Southeast Asia.

With the new fund, AC Ventures plans to make an initial investment of as much as $3 million in each startup. It has put money into companies such as logistics startup Kargo and BukuWarung, a bookkeeping app built for 60 million micro-merchants in the country.

“With AC Ventures, we can invest across the spectrum — from very early-stage, to growth and late-stage startups,” Sjahrir said in an interview. “The Covid-19 era has shown entrepreneurs with grit, and investment companies that can put capital to work.”

Read more: Singapore’s Indies Raises $100 Million for Third Asian Fund

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Exclusive: HSBC targets net zero emissions by 2050, earmarks $1 trillion green financing

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LONDON (Reuters) – HSBC HSBA.L will target net zero carbon emissions across its entire customer base by 2050 at the latest, and provide between $750 billion and $1 trillion in financing to help clients make the transition, its Chief Executive Noel Quinn told Reuters.

FILE PHOTO: HSBC logo is seen on a branch bank in the financial district in New York, U.S., August 7, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

In the strongest statement by Europe’s biggest bank on climate change to date, its CEO outlined HSBC’s ambitions to align its activities with the Paris Agreement.

“COVID has been a wake-up call to us all, including me personally, we have seen how fragile the global economy is to a major event, in this case a health event, and it brings home the reality of what a major climate event could do,” Quinn told Reuters in a video interview.

HSBC aims to achieve net zero in its own operations by 2030, he added.

While other UK banks such as NatWest NWG.L have already set similar net-zero goals, HSBC’s aim to achieve it across its huge Asia-focused client base is one of the most significant pledges made by a global lender to date.

However, the bank will be closely watched for how quickly and fully it pursues its new goals, which are mainly stated as ‘aims’ rather than hard commitments.

It will also face scrutiny on whether it has allowed itself leeway to continue financing some fossil fuel-linked clients, especially in developing markets.

HSBC has come under increasing pressure from activists, shareholders and politicians who say it is contributing to climate change by financing fossil fuel and other environmentally harmful projects.

Quinn said the bank is focused on expanding its capital markets-focused carbon transition policies, to a broader one encompassing all its activities across financing,

AMD Targets PC Gamers With New Ryzen 5000 Desktop CPUs Arriving on Nov. 5

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(Credit: AMD)

AMD’s new desktop CPUs, the Ryzen 5000 series, will start arriving on Nov. 5 with the goal of offering the best PC gaming performance. 

The main improvements involve the Zen 3 architecture, which is designed to boost the max clock speeds and increase the instructions per clock by 19 percent. The layout on the Ryzen chips has also been redesigned so that the cores have direct access to the L3 cache for lower latency, enabling faster PC gaming. 

“Zen 3 increases our overall lead in performance,” said AMD CEO Lisa Su during a Thursday event. “It increases our lead in power efficiency, and also now it delivers the best single-threaded performance and gaming performance as well.”

The Ryzen 5000 family will first arrive in four processors: 

  • The Ryzen 9 5950X: a 16-core, 32-thread chip for $799

  • The Ryzen 9 5900X: a 12-core, 24-thread chip for $549

  • The Ryzen 7 5800X: a 8-core, 16-thread chip for $449

  • The Ryzen 5600X: a 6-core, 12-thread chip for $299

The Ryzen 5000 series specs(Credit: AMD)

To demonstrate the performance increase, the company revealed some benchmarks for the Ryzen 9 5900X. As you can see, the chip can offer on average a 26 percent increase in gaming performance over the Ryzen 9 3900XT chip when playing titles at 1080p. 

AMD provided benchmark(Credit: AMD)

AMD also claims the Ryzen 9 5900X can largely outperform Intel’s Core i9-10900K on rendering the latest games at 1080p, although the performance boost ranges from single digits up to 21 percent. (Currently pricing for the normally $488 Core i9-10900K has inflated to $650 to as much $774.)

AMD provided benchmark(Credit: AMD)

The new AMD chips promise to address how the company’s previous silicon generally underperformed against Intel in certain gaming scenarios, such as when playing at lower resolutions and when the game leaned heavily on the CPU.