New global temperature data will inform study of climate impacts on health, agriculture — ScienceDaily

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A seemingly small one-to-two degree change in the global climate can dramatically alter weather-related hazards. Given that such a small change can result in such big impacts, it is important to have the most accurate information possible when studying the impact of climate change. This can be especially challenging in data sparse areas like Africa, where some of the most dangerous hazards are expected to emerge.

A new data set published in the journal Scientific Data provides high-resolution, daily temperatures from around the globe that could prove valuable in studying human health impacts from heat waves, risks to agriculture, droughts, potential crop failures, and food insecurity.

Data scientists Andrew Verdin and Kathryn Grace of the Minnesota Population Center at the University of Minnesota worked with colleagues at the Climate Hazards Center at the University of California Santa Barbara to produce and validate the data set.

“It’s important to have this high-resolution because of the wide-ranging impacts — to health, agriculture, infrastructure. People experiencing heat waves, crop failures, droughts — that’s all local,” said Verdin, the lead author.

By combining weather station data, remotely sensed infrared data and the weather simulation models, this new data set provides daily estimates of 2-meter maximum and minimum air temperatures for 1983-2016. Named CHIRTS-daily, this data provides high levels of accuracy, even in areas where on-site weather data collection is sparse. Current efforts are focused on updating the data set in near real time.

“We know that the next 20 years are going to bring more extreme heat waves that will put millions or even billions of people in harm’s way. CHIRTS-daily will help us monitor, understand, and mitigate these rapidly emerging climate hazards,” said Chris Funk, director of the Climate Hazards Center.

Additionally, the people who are most vulnerable are often located in areas

Modelling extreme magnetic fields and temperature variation on distant stars

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IMAGE

IMAGE: The maps show the heat distribution. The bue regions are cooler – and the yellow regions are hotter.

It describes data taken from the following magentars: 4U 0142+61, 1E 1547.0-5408, XTE…
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Credit: University of Leeds

New research is helping to explain one of the big questions that has perplexed astrophysicists for the past 30 years – what causes the changing brightness of distant stars called magnetars.

Magnetars were formed from stellar explosions or supernovae and they have extremely strong magnetic fields, estimated to be around 100 million, million times greater than the magnetic field found on earth.

The magnetic field generates intense heat and x-rays. It is so strong it also affects the physical properties of matter, most notably the way that heat is conducted through the crust of the star and across its surface, creating the variations in brightness across the star which has puzzled astrophysicists and astronomers.

A team of scientists – led by Dr Andrei Igoshev at the University of Leeds – has developed a mathematical model that simulates the way the magnetic field disrupts the conventional understanding of heat being distributed uniformly and creates hotter and cooler regions where there may be a difference in temperature of one million degrees Celsius.

Those hotter and cooler regions emit x-rays of differing intensity – and it is that variation in x-ray intensity that is observed as changing brightness by space-borne telescopes.

The findings are published today (12 October) in the journal Nature Astronomy. The research was funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC).

Dr Igoshev, from the School of Mathematics at Leeds, said: “We see this constant pattern of hot and cold regions. Our model – based on the physics of magnetic fields and the physics of heat – predicts the

Can temperature scanning slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

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A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Temperature scanning device makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan, CEO of Infrared Cameras Inc. “It’s impacting so many different places. We have to do something.”

Thermal cameras and other technologies that can pick out COVID-19 cases are a Holy Grail for an airline industry that has lost 70% of its business and is facing another quarter of multibillion-dollar losses, along with any other business or institution trying to keep people safe.

Airlines are trying hard to find ways to limit the spread of COVID-19 and assure governments that travelers aren’t bringing the disease with them.

Fort Worth-based American Airlines will let passengers bound for Hawaii take rapid COVID-19 tests at DFW International Airport. The airline is also working on a similar program for travelers to Europe and Latin America.

States such as New York require two-week quarantines for travelers from most other states, as do Hawaii, Connecticut and New Jersey. Hawaii is lifting its quarantine requirement Oct. 15 for

Teledyne DALSA’s thermal imaging camera plays pivotal role in Nuvoola’s AI-powered elevated skin temperature screening solution

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Nuvoola’s Luke AI Health Screening and Protection solution

Teledyne DALSA's Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution

WATERLOO, Ontario, Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Teledyne DALSA, a Teledyne Technologies [NYSE:TDY] company, and global leader in digital imaging technology, is pleased to provide its new Calibir GXF thermal camera as a critical component within Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution.

The new Calibir GXF model is optimized for elevated skin temperature detection with measurement accuracy and thermal stability better than +/-0.3°C with an external reference (as recommended by IEC80601-2-59). Like Calibir GXM models, the new GXF camera is NDAA, Section 889 compliant with IEC 80601-2-59-2017 certification pending.

Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution is unique in using their artificial intelligence platform to screen employees, suppliers, customers and visitors in just a few seconds. The solution, which benefits from the power of Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir™ infrared camera, includes an app that employees use to assess their health status before arriving at work, in addition to an onsite, touchless kiosk (using natural language interactions in English or French) that rapidly screens people for symptoms of COVID-19 as they enter buildings. It also includes analytics and predictive insights capabilities, meaning that it can alert on trends or changes in someone’s condition.

“We believe our system is a great way for companies to protect their employees. The threat of shut down due to employees spreading COVID-19 is real and will continue for some time,” said Martin Renière, President of Nuvoola. “Our expertise in computer vision, natural language processing and speech recognition provide our LUKE AI kiosk with the ability to automate and reinforce

Climate change responsible for record sea temperature levels — ScienceDaily

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Global warming is driving an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures including in the Mediterranean, according to a major new report published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Operational Oceanography.

Data from the European Union’s (EU) Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) will increase concerns about the threat to the world’s seas and oceans from climate change.

The Ocean State Report reveals an overall trend globally of surface warming based on evidence from 1993 to 2018, with the largest rise in the Arctic Ocean.

European seas experienced record high temperatures in 2018, a phenomenon which the researchers attribute to extreme weather conditions — a marine heat wave lasting several months.

In the same year, a large mass of warm water occurred in the northeast Pacific Ocean, according to the report. This was similar to a marine heatwave — dubbed ‘the Blob’ — which was first detected in 2013 and had devastating effects on marine life.

Now the study authors are calling for improved monitoring to provide better data and knowledge. They argue this will help countries progress towards sustainable use of seas and oceans which are an essential source of food, energy and other resources.

Findings from the report confirm record rises in sea temperatures

“Changes to the ocean have impacted on these (ocean) ecosystem services and stretched them to unsustainable limits,” says Karina von Schuckmann and Pierre-Yves Le Traon, the report’s editors.

“More than ever a long term, comprehensive and systematic monitoring, assessment and reporting of the ocean is required. This is to ensure a sustainable science-based management of the ocean for societal benefit.”

The Ocean State Report identifies other major strains on the world’s seas and oceans from climate change including acidification caused by carbon dioxide uptake from the atmosphere, sea level rise, loss of oxygen and sea ice