FLIR Systems announces four Exx-Series thermal imaging cameras | Security News

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FLIR Systems, Inc. announces four new additions to its Exx-Series of advanced thermal imaging cameras: the E96, E86, E76 and E54. Compared to predecessor Exx-Series cameras, the new cameras offer an enhanced thermal resolution for more vibrant, easy-to-read images and on-camera routing capability to improve field survey efficiency.

The new Exx-Series cameras are designed to help professionals detect the early signs of building issues, identify hot spots, troubleshoot electrical and mechanical systems, and prevent problems before they cause damage that leads to expensive repairs.

Improved measurement results

The E96, with a 640×480 resolution and eight-times digital zoom, is the most advanced Exx-Series thermal camera to date. It delivers improved measurement results over the greatest distance to target, so professionals can safely diagnose electrical faults or locate hidden anomalies at very high temperatures up to 1500 degrees Celsius (2732 degrees Fahrenheit), including in harsh industrial environments such as steel mills or kilns, to help keep the workplace running smoothly.

FLIR Inspection Route is now offered as a standard feature on every Exx-Series camera

For the first time, FLIR Inspection Route is now offered as a standard feature on every Exx-Series camera and is complemented by the FLIR Thermal Studio Pro software with Route Creator plugin, sold separately as an annual subscription. The complete routing bundle enables professionals to create and export custom inspection and pre-planned routes, ideal for large or multi-location electrical or mechanical projects.

Advanced thermal imaging

The new Exx-Series advanced thermal imaging cameras enable building professionals, inspectors, engineers, researchers, and facility maintenance personnel to do more than ever before with a handheld thermal camera,” said Rickard Lindvall, General Manager, Solutions Business at FLIR. “With improved thermal resolution and on-camera routing capabilities, the Exx Series can help our customers make better, informed decisions to complete the job

Can thermal cameras slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

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A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Thermal camera makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan, CEO of Infrared Cameras Inc. “It’s impacting so many different places. We have to do something.”

Thermal cameras that can pick out COVID-19 cases are a Holy Grail for an airline industry that has lost 70% of its business and is facing another quarter of multibillion-dollar losses, along with any other business or institution trying to keep people safe.

Airlines are trying hard to find ways to limit the spread of COVID-19 and assure governments that travelers aren’t bringing the disease with them.

Fort Worth-based American Airlines will let passengers bound for Hawaii take rapid COVID-19 tests at DFW International Airport. The airline is also working on a similar program for travelers to Europe and Latin America.

States such as New York require two-week quarantines for travelers from most other states, as do Hawaii, Connecticut and New Jersey. Hawaii is lifting its quarantine requirement Oct. 15 for travelers who test negative

Honeywell Acquires Rocky Research, A Technology Leader In Power And Thermal Management

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PHOENIX, Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Honeywell (NYSE: HON) has acquired privately held Rocky Research, a Boulder City, Nevada-based technology leader specializing in thermal, energy and power management solutions. This acquisition expands Honeywell’s existing, broad portfolio, which includes power generation systems, energy storage, and power and thermal management systems. It also combines Rocky Research’s proven research and development capabilities with Honeywell’s worldwide reach and engineering integration, test and production expertise.

The acquisition of Rocky Research positions Honeywell with an advanced capability in the fast-growing power and thermal management market. The combined, differentiated capabilities of Rocky Research and Honeywell will help reduce the size, weight, power and cost of thermal and power management and hardware systems. Rocky Research will be integrated into Honeywell’s Aerospace business.

“Rocky Research is an ideal addition to Honeywell’s expanding product portfolio. Effective cooling systems optimized for size, weight and power are critical to meet the growing need for aircraft electrification, unmanned and autonomous aerial vehicles, and related systems,” said Mike Madsen, president and chief executive officer of Honeywell Aerospace. “Rocky Research will augment Honeywell’s existing technology capabilities in these areas.”

Rocky Research’s sole owner, President and CEO, Uwe Rockenfeller, will join Honeywell and continue to serve as president, Rocky Research, which will be held as a wholly owned subsidiary focused on power and thermal research and development. Rocky Research’s current location in Huntsville, Alabama, will remain a key integration and testing site, and its headquarters in Boulder City will serve as a research and development center.

“Honeywell and Rocky Research are a highly complementary match, fortifying Rocky Research’s technology with Honeywell’s world-class supply chain and manufacturing resources to meet growing demands for this technology,” Rockenfeller said. “As a combined business, we will be able to provide our customer base with a full range of solutions, from

Teledyne DALSA’s thermal imaging camera plays pivotal role in Nuvoola’s AI-powered elevated skin temperature screening solution

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Nuvoola’s Luke AI Health Screening and Protection solution

Teledyne DALSA's Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution

WATERLOO, Ontario, Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Teledyne DALSA, a Teledyne Technologies [NYSE:TDY] company, and global leader in digital imaging technology, is pleased to provide its new Calibir GXF thermal camera as a critical component within Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution.

The new Calibir GXF model is optimized for elevated skin temperature detection with measurement accuracy and thermal stability better than +/-0.3°C with an external reference (as recommended by IEC80601-2-59). Like Calibir GXM models, the new GXF camera is NDAA, Section 889 compliant with IEC 80601-2-59-2017 certification pending.

Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution is unique in using their artificial intelligence platform to screen employees, suppliers, customers and visitors in just a few seconds. The solution, which benefits from the power of Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir™ infrared camera, includes an app that employees use to assess their health status before arriving at work, in addition to an onsite, touchless kiosk (using natural language interactions in English or French) that rapidly screens people for symptoms of COVID-19 as they enter buildings. It also includes analytics and predictive insights capabilities, meaning that it can alert on trends or changes in someone’s condition.

“We believe our system is a great way for companies to protect their employees. The threat of shut down due to employees spreading COVID-19 is real and will continue for some time,” said Martin Renière, President of Nuvoola. “Our expertise in computer vision, natural language processing and speech recognition provide our LUKE AI kiosk with the ability to automate and reinforce

Better detection of microwave radiation will improve thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications — ScienceDaily

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Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar.

Researchers published their study in the peer-reviewed journal Nature. The team includes scientists from Harvard University, The Institute of Photonic Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, and Raytheon BBN Technologies. The Army, in part, funded the work to fabricate this bolometer by exploiting the giant thermal response of graphene to microwave radiation.

“The microwave bolometer developed under this project is so sensitive that it is capable of detecting a single microwave photon, which is the smallest amount of energy in nature,” said Dr. Joe Qiu, program manager for solid-state electronics and electromagnetics, Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory. “This technology will potentially enable new capabilities for applications such as quantum sensing and radar, and ensure the U.S. Army maintains spectral dominance in the foreseeable future.”

The graphene bolometer sensor detects electromagnetic radiation by measuring the temperature rise as the photons are absorbed into the sensor. Graphene is a two dimensional, one-atom layer thick material. The researchers achieved a high bolometer sensitivity by incorporating graphene in the microwave antenna.

A key innovation in this advancement is to measure the temperature rise by superconducting Josephson junction while maintaining a high microwave radiation coupling into the graphene through an antenna, researchers said. The coupling efficiency is essential in a high sensitivity detection because “every precious photon counts.”

A Josephson junction is a quantum mechanical device which is made of two superconducting electrodes separated by a barrier (thin insulating tunnel barrier, normal metal, semiconductor, ferromagnet, etc.)

In addition to being thin, the