Netflix Thinks It’s So Great, You Don’t Even Need to Check Out How Great It Is

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If you haven’t yet subscribed to any of the major streaming services, first I have to ask: How have you avoided them? Second: You’ve missed the boat when it comes to trying the biggest names for free.



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© Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP (Getty Images)


Streaming giant Netflix quietly did away with its 30-day trial in the U.S., according to CNET, just like Disney+, which stopped offering free trials back in June. The U.S. is not the only market where Netflix has decided to end its free trial. The company ended trial periods in Mexico and several other countries as far back as two years ago.

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“Free trials are not available, but you can still sign up and take advantage of all Netflix has to offer,” Netflix’s free trial help page now reads. In a statement to CNET, a Netflix spokesperson said the company is currently looking at different marketing promotions in the U.S. to “attract new members and give them a great Netflix experience.”

If you’re disappointed, that’s understandable. Who doesn’t like to get something for free, even if it’s for a limited time? If you’re planning on signing up for your own Netflix account, you’ll need to shell out a minimum of $9 month.

This might have to do with the fact that Netflix is currently offering specific TV shows and movies to watch for free, which it began doing in August. Current free titles include Stranger Things, Bird Box, and When They See Us, which, honestly, are worth watching whether you want to pay for Netflix or not.

It’s also worth noting that several other streaming services still offer free trials. Hulu offers one month free, while CBS All Access, Shudder, and HBO Max offer a free week. And Peacock offers an entire free

Netflix Thinks It’s So Great You Don’t Even Need to Check Out How Great It Is

0 Comments

If you haven’t yet subscribed to any of the major streaming services, first I have to ask: How have you avoided them? Second: You’ve missed the boat when it comes to trying the biggest names for free.



a screen shot of a computer


© Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP (Getty Images)


Streaming giant Netflix quietly did away with its 30-day trial in the U.S., according to CNET, just like Disney+, which stopped offering free trials back in June. The U.S. is not the only market where Netflix has decided to end its free trial. The company ended trial periods in Mexico and several other countries as far back as two years ago.

“Free trials are not available, but you can still sign up and take advantage of all Netflix has to offer,” Netflix’s free trial help page now reads. In a statement to CNET, a Netflix spokesperson said the company is currently looking at differen marketing promotions in the U.S. to “attract new members and give them a great Netflix experience.”

If you’re disappointed, that’s understandable. Who doesn’t like to get something for free, even if it’s for a limited time? If you’re planning on signing up for your own Netflix account, you’ll need to shell out a minimum of $9 month.

This might have to do with the fact that Netflix is currently offering specific TV shows and movies to watch for free, which it began doing in August. Current free titles include Stranger Things, Bird Box, and When They See Us, which, honestly, are worth watching whether you want to pay for Netflix or not.

It’s also worth noting that several other streaming services still offer free trials. Hulu offers one month free, while CBS All Access, Shudder, and HBO Max offer a free week. And Peacock offers an entire free tier, which

Jim Cramer Thinks Disney’s Reorganization Is Focused on ‘Getting Rid of ESPN’

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Walt Disney is undergoing a major reorganization.

The company, on Monday, said that it’s reorganizing its media and entertainment businesses and named Kareem Daniel as Chairman, Media and Entertainment Distribution.

The company said in a news release the move would accelerate its direct-to-consumer strategy.

A newly centralized distribution group will oversee commercialization and distribution of all content globally.

Daniel will report to Bob Chapek, chief executive officer of Disney. “Kareem is an exceptionally talented, innovative and forward-looking leader, with a strong track record for developing and implementing successful global content distribution and commercialization strategies,” Chapek said in the statement.

Daniel has held leadership positions across a variety of businesses, including consumer products, games and interactive experiences, publishing, studio distribution, and Walt Disney Imagineering, according to the statement.

Content creation will be managed in three groups: Studios, General Entertainment and Sports. “The company’s three content groups will be responsible and accountable for producing and delivering content for theatrical, linear and streaming, with the primary focus being the company’s streaming services,” according to the statement.

Jim Cramer weighs in on Disney’s reorganization and his thoughts on ESPN in the video above.

You can follow Jim Cramer and Katherine Ross on Twitter at @JimCramer and @byKatherineRoss. Read more from Katherine Ross here.

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Does Yelp’s Racism Warning Put A ‘Scarlet R’ On Businesses? Twitter Thinks So

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After Yelp (YELP) announced that it was placing a consumer alert on businesses associated with past racist actions, the company has now come under fire by Twitter users who are claiming the search site’s newest feature is problematic.

Yelp made the announcement on Thursday, saying at the time that is was taking a “stand against racism” by placing a consumer warning on businesses that used “racist language or symbols” and had gained public attention for “racist conduct.”

The review company wrote in a Twitter post, “Now, when a business gains attention for reports of racist conduct, Yelp will place a new Business Accused of Racist Behavior Alert on their Yelp page to inform users, along with a link to a news article where they can learn more.”

Users on Twitter were quick to react to the new policy, with some calling Yelp out for “communist” behavior.

 

 

Others on Twitter called for customers to delete the Yelp app, with one user posting, “Just uninstalled your app for terrorism.”

Another user on Twitter agreed with the need to delete the app, writing, “Aaannnnd… Im done with @yelp. Good luck this…stunt.”

Why Walmart Plus thinks it can challenge Amazon Prime

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Walmart Plus is the big-box retailer’s latest effort at subscriptions.


Juan Camilo Bernal/Getty Images

Just ahead of the holiday shopping season, Walmart is making a new push into a subscription service. The concept, called Walmart Plus, launched two weeks ago and so far includes only a handful of perks. But it might someday shake up the e-commerce subscription market that’s thoroughly dominated by Amazon Prime.

Walmart is one of the very few companies that could hope to challenge Amazon, which has a 15-year headstart and boasts over 150 million members worldwide. As the biggest retailer in the world, Walmart has the resources, finances and logistics infrastructure to build out a viable Prime rival.

It’s got a very long way to go. Walmart Plus, which costs $98 a year, offers shipping as fast as same-day for orders over $35. It also offers a fuel discount and a “Scan & Go” feature that lets in-store shoppers scan and pay for items using their phones, so they can avoid the checkout line. Amazon Prime, costing $119 annually, offers one-day shipping even for orders under $10, the Prime Now rapid-delivery service, Prime Video and Prime Music streaming services.

Walmart says it’s just getting started, though some of its other attempts at subscriptions — such as the now discontinued ShippingPass and Jetblack programs — haven’t lasted.

An early test for Walmart is coming up very soon, with Amazon’s Prime Day sale  expected to encourage hordes of customers to shop online to find deals. The event is sure to bring in new Prime customers, but Walmart — which will be hosting a rival sale — may be able to bring in some new Plus customers too.

CNET spoke with Janey Whiteside,