How Online Reviews Help You Detect Bad Quality Smartphones

Some of us relate to the distress of making a purchase and then ending up having completely been scammed! 

Well, this is not something new in the smartphone industry. I remember once my sister purchased a phone online and on delivery, the advertised 64Gb was scaled down to 32Gb. 

The company had no return policy and she had no other options but to use it regardless. That was many years ago and stringent measures have been put in place regarding e-commerce. 

While it might be a good thing for companies to flood the market as it lowers the product prices benefiting the consumer, too many companies make it hard for consumers to know online multimedia companies to trust who to trust.

It, therefore, necessities one to be cautious before making a purchase. To do this,  a good consumer knows the value of reading reviews.

In this article, we shall look at how online reviews help one detect bad quality smartphones.

Online reviews give accurate information about product performance.

Big smartphone brands are always competing with each other to produce better and better products each year. 

With this in mind, you’re more likely to be assured that you’ll be getting something good. However, for those small upcoming smartphone companies, it’s hard to tell the performance.

This is why you need consumer reviews to confirm whether the smartphone lives up to the advertised standards.

Sometimes the smartphone might have even better performance than most similar phones but it just becomes difficult to attest when the company manufacturing is not a “big name”.

On the other hand, some phones from big companies genuinely are of poor performance contrary to what we may expect.

 

To know this, you’ll have to check on the product reviews. 

  • Negative reviews act as Caution.

You’ve probably heard of

Verisma Adds to its Industry-Leading Online Suite of Self-Service Consumer Solutions

Extends convenience to attorneys

Verisma Systems, Inc., an industry leader in disclosure management technology and services to the US provider market, has announced the expansion of their ground-breaking Verisma Request App™ (VRA) technology. Verisma will now offer the same self-service capabilities, along with an expanded online request management portal, to 3rd party attorney organizations. Verisma’s expanded VRA platform and request management portal will provide attorneys with a remote, self-managed approach to electronic record ordering, tracking, payment, and delivery. This change will enhance efficiency and compliance, result in a more satisfied requestor experience, and eliminate the stress on providers of a paper-driven manual request process.

Benefits of VRA Attorney include:

  • Up to a 50% reduction in total request turn-around-times with elimination of a paper driven request mail process, a manual paper request intake and logging process, and a manual delivery of paper record copies.

  • Up to a 30% reduction in labor, supplies and postage costs with less need of a manual paper request intake, manual paper record copy distribution, and manual call support process.

  • Strengthened compliance through advanced e-request/e-delivery capabilities significantly reducing common manual paper request entry and paper record copy delivery errors.

  • Improved requestor satisfaction with ability to self-manage the entire request experience online while receiving record copies faster than ever before.

About Verisma: From our technology to our people and our partnerships, we believe our purpose is to protect truth and accuracy. Learn more about our disclosure management system at verisma.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005099/en/

Contacts

Davy Simanivanh
Verisma
571.205.6722
[email protected]

Source Article

How JPMorgan and BlackRock are thinking of playing fund manager M&A

  • Top brass from JPMorgan and BlackRock, among the firms to kick off earnings season with their results, said Tuesday that they expect more consolidation in the wealth- and asset-management industries.
  • Pressures on money managers have fueled a flurry of acquisitions in those areas this year, and analysts questioned executives about their own deal ambitions, albeit coming from different corners of the market. 
  • JPMorgan boss Jamie Dimon said the bank would be “very interested” in deals in that space, and BlackRock finance chief Gary Shedlin said the firm was focused on targets that could expand its technology, global distribution, and private markets capabilities.
  • Last week, Morgan Stanley said it would buy investment manager Eaton Vance in a deal valued at $7 billion just days after it closed on its E-Trade acquisition. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top brass at the world’s largest asset manager and largest US bank told analysts on Tuesday that they expect more mergers and acquisitions in the wealth- and asset-management industries, and signaled both firms are on the prowl. 

On the back of Morgan Stanley’s $7 billion deal for Eaton Vance last week, analysts peppered JPMorgan and BlackRock executives with questions about their appetites for deals during their respective third-quarter calls, which helped kick off the latest earnings season. 

“Well, since we have you all on the line, our doors, our lines are wide open. We would be very interested, and we do think you’ll see consolidation of the business,” JPMorgan Chief Executive Jamie Dimon said. 

“But we’re not going to be more specific than that,” he said, adding there were considerations around what type of deal would make sense for the largest US bank by assets, like technology, product, and execution. 

Dimon emphasized early this year that he was interested in carrying out more

IDC’s 3rd Platform Industry Spending Guides Provide In-Depth Forecasts for Technology Investments in Nine Industries

To bring more insight to technology spending across and within industries, International Data Corporation (IDC) recently published a series of Industry Spending Guides that provide in-depth forecasts for spending on 3rd Platform technologies (mobility, cloud, big data and analytics (BDA), social) and Innovation Accelerators (artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality/virtual reality (AR/VR), 3D printing, Internet of Things (IoT), security, and robotics) as well as traditional, 2nd Platform technologies. The guides cover nine industries – banking, government, healthcare, insurance, manufacturing, oil and gas, retail, securities and investment services, and utilities – and provide detailed spending figures for nine geographic regions, 64 sub-industries and lines of business, and two delivery types (cloud and non-cloud).

“While IT spending is contracting in some areas, 3rd Platform spending will see healthy double-digit growth throughout the post-COVID recovery period and the investment priorities are somewhat varied across industries,” said Karen Massey, research manager, Customer Insights & Analysis. “The financial services industries, which include banking, securities and investment services, and insurance, rely more heavily on cloud, mobility and BDA, for example. But IoT is the primary investment focus in the other six industries, especially manufacturing, oil and gas, and utilities. However, mobility is a close second to IoT as an investment priority in government and healthcare.”

Within the banking industry, consumer banking is the largest line of business for technology spending with 2nd Platform technologies accounting for just over half the total in 2020. However, the shift from 2nd to 3rd Platform spending is evident with 3rd Platform and Innovation Accelerator spending enjoying compound annual growth rates (CAGR) of 10.4% and 17.7% respectively. Cloud and mobility spending will grow to nearly $53 billion combined in 2023 while cognitive AI spending will see a five-year CAGR of 21.6%. By the end of the forecast, 2nd Platform spending will be

Nokia signs multiyear deal to migrate its data center infrastructure to Google Cloud

Networking equipment provider Nokia announced that it has signed a multiyear agreement to use Google as its cloud infrastructure provider. Nokia said it will migrate its global data centers and servers, as well as various software applications, onto Google Cloud infrastructure over an 18- to 24-month period.

Nokia said the deal reflects the company’s operational shift toward a cloud-first IT strategy. The cloud move is also meant to help Nokia manage its digital operations and expand collaboration capabilities for its employees working remotely amid the pandemic.

Also: 5G could generate trillions in benefits in the next decade. So why aren’t companies moving faster with it?

 Under the deal, Nokia will use a suite of Google Cloud products and services, with its infrastructure and applications running in the public cloud or via SaaS model. The companies have also worked out a customized migration schedule that will allow Nokia to exit its data centers more quickly. Google Cloud will deploy strategic systems integrators, solutions specialists, and engineers to ensure a stable migration, the companies said.

“Nokia is on a digital transformation path that is about fundamentally changing how we operate and do business,” said Ravi Parmasad, VP of Global IT Infrastructure at Nokia. “This is crucial for how our employees collaborate so that we continue to raise the bar on meeting the needs of our customers. Given Nokia’s digital ambitions and plans, this is an ideal time for Nokia to be taking this step with Google Cloud to accelerate our efforts; and doing all of this in a secure and scalable way.”

RELATED COVERAGE: 

Source Article