Researchers identified that SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells can be selectively treated with thymoquinone — ScienceDaily

The compound thymoquinone (TQ) selectively kills prostate cancer cells at advanced stages, according to a new study published in Oncogene. Led by researchers at Kanazawa University, the study reports that prostate cancer cells with a deletion of the SUCLA2 gene can be therapeutically targeted. SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancers represent a significant fraction of those resistant to hormone therapy or metastatic, and a new therapeutic option for this disease would have immense benefits for patients.

Hormone therapy is often chosen for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer but nearly half of patients develop resistance to the treatment in as little as 2 years. A mutation in RB1, a tumor suppressor gene that keeps cell growth under control, has been pegged as a particularly strong driver of treatment resistance and predicts poor outcome in patients.

“Mutations in tumor suppressor genes are enough to induce initiation and malignant progression of prostate cancer, but so far we haven’t been able to directly target these mutations with drugs to treat prostate cancer,” says the lead author Susumu Kohno. “We wanted to find a genetic aberration associated with that of a tumor suppressor gene which we could target therapeutically.”

In the genome, SUCLA2 neighbors RB1. An analysis of prostate cancer cells showed that cells with a RB1 deletion were also missing SUCLA2, pairing up the SUCLA2 deletion with the RB1 deletion present in advanced stage prostate cancer. Kohno and colleagues analyzed prostate cancer tissue and found that 11% of cases were missing both SUCLA2 and RB1.

The researchers screened compounds to identify drugs that would selectively kill cells with a SUCLA2 deletion. Out of around 2,000 compounds, TQ emerged as a hit compound. TQ already has known anti-cancer effects and was shown to be safe in a phase I clinical trial. Kohno and colleagues applied the

Regular breaks, short meetings, and other advice

Schedule super quick meetings just to check in with colleagues. Read more. And try to fit “moments of transition” into your daily schedule.



Satya Nadella smiling for the camera: Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. (GeekWire Photo / Kevin Lisota)


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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. (GeekWire Photo / Kevin Lisota)

Those are some tips from Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella to help manage well-being with the new WFH lifestyle.

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Nadella spoke this week at the Wall Street Journal’s CEO Council. He said he’s focused on three major considerations of how the nature is work is changing amid the pandemic: how collaboration happens, how learning happens inside companies, and how to ensure employees aren’t burning out.

The last point has become even more important over the past several months as workers conduct multiple meetings per day via video and don’t have the same interactions with colleagues at a physical office. Microsoft studies show that people are now working after hours and on weekends more frequently, and that remote work is leading to more stress and mental fatigue.

Nadella said people can get more tired because of the concentration required during video calls. That’s why Microsoft earlier this summer rolled out the new Microsoft Teams “Together” mode, a feature for video meetings that places participants against a shared virtual background, out of the traditional grid view, to help create the perception of sitting together.

Nadella also called out the new “virtual commute” feature for Teams, which uses automation tech to help users close out tasks and designate work for the following day, log their sentiment about the work day, and direct them into a guided meditation process. Microsoft said its research finds that the blurred lines between work and home are hurting remote workers’ feelings of well-being.

Whether it’s the bus ride to and from work, or even walking down a hallway for your next

Asia-Pacific has more billionaires than other regions, as pandemic boosts wealth

There are now 2,189 billionaires globally with a combined wealth of $10.2 trillion, as the pandemic-induced stock market rally catapulted the net worth of the world’s uber wealthy to a new high. 

As of July 2020, Asia-Pacific accounted for the highest number of ultra-high net worth individuals, with 831 (38%) of the super rich residing in the region, where billionaire wealth now totals $3.3 trillion, according to Swiss bank UBS’ new Billionaires Insights Report 2020. That compares to 762 (35%) across the Americas and 596 (27%) in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA). 

The findings, based on interviews and data from 2,000 billionaires across 43 markets, saw Asia-Pacific retain its global position as “the engine of wealth growth,” UBS Global Wealth Management’s Anurag Mahesh said at the report’s launch Wednesday.  

Mainland China emerged as the region’s top market for wealth creation, with 415 billionaires, followed by India (114), Hong King (65) Taiwan (40) and Australia (39). The U.S. is home to 636 billionaires, the study found.

Wealth generators

Much of the billionaire wealth growth seen this year was closely correlated to the market recovery staged since April’s dramatic sell-off, since the assets of the ultra wealthy are typically tied up in the public companies they run or invest in. 

However, from 2019 to the peak of the downturn in April 2020, Asian billionaire wealth emerged relatively unscathed, dropping 2.1% compared to 10.1% in EMEA and 7.4% in the Americas.

Manesh, Asia-Pacific co-head of UBS’s Global Family Office, said they could be partly related to the region’s dominance in two key  industries — technology and health care — which have surged in the wake of the pandemic.

Asia-Pacific is home to the world’s highest share of tech and health-care billionaires, accounting for 181 (8%) of the total billionaire population, compared

Study confirms genetic link in cerebral palsy — ScienceDaily

An international research team including the University of Adelaide has found further evidence that rare gene mutations can cause cerebral palsy, findings which could lead to earlier diagnosis and new treatments for this devastating movement disorder.

In the study published in the journal Nature Genetics researchers employed gene sequencing to examine the DNA of 250 cerebral palsy families, and compared this to a control group of almost 1800 unaffected families. They then demonstrated the impact rare gene mutations can have on movement control using a fruit fly model.

The findings have important clinical implications. They will provide some answers to parents, as well as guide healthcare and family planning such as counselling for recurrence risk — often quoted as around 1 per cent but could be as high as 10 per cent when factoring in genetic risks.

Co-author of the research, Emeritus Professor Alastair MacLennan, AO, at the University of Adelaide, says the new study confirms the pioneering work of the Australian Collaborative Cerebral Palsy Research Group based at the Robinson Research Institute at the University of Adelaide.

“Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive developmental movement disorder impacting motor function, which affects approximately one in every 700 births in Australia and a similar number worldwide.

Symptoms range from mild to severe and can include intellectual disability,” Emeritus Professor MacLennan said.

“Historically, cerebral palsy was considered largely the result of perinatal asphyxia — decreased oxygen to the baby’s brain at birth, however this has only been in found in 8-10 per cent of cases.

“Eliminating other known causes, including premature birth and trauma at birth, this leaves a large number of cases — as many as 40 per cent in some studies — with an unknown origin.”

Researchers at the University of Adelaide over many years have advocated that cerebral palsy is

Xbox Boss Says Game Pass Streaming Planned For PC And Consoles, Too

Xbox Game Pass games can now be streamed through mobile devices thanks to xCloud, making it much easier than ever before to play The Master Chief Collection on the toilet. But this is just the start of Microsoft’s plans for streaming, and Xbox boss Phil Spencer has indicated in a tweet that streaming will make its way to Game Pass on Xbox and PC, too.

Replying to a tweet asking directly whether Game Pass on console and PC would allow for streaming at some point–allowing users to demo a game before committing to a download–Spencer responded saying that they have a plan in the works for this. “It’s in the long list of cool things the xCloud team is working on, just a bit further down the list,” he said.

This means that the feature could be a while off yet, but it’s at least being planned, and we could eventually see Game Pass streaming on these systems.

Microsoft’s recent purchase of Bethesda parent company ZeniMax means that they now has access to the company’s Orion streaming technology, which could be a large part of their future strategy.

Microsoft’s next systems, the Xbox Series X and Series S, will release on November 10. If you’re looking to pick up either system, or some new Xbox games for the end of the year, check out GameSpot’s 2020 Xbox Gift Guide.