‘Two Screens for Teachers’ to supply extra monitors in Seattle and puts out call for help in other cities

The two-screen setup of an elementary school teacher in Seattle. (Photo courtesy of Two Screens for Teachers)

Remote teaching is about to get a little bit easier for thousands of teachers in Seattle Public Schools. The nonprofit organization “Two Screens for Teachers” announced Tuesday that it’s purchasing a second computer monitor for every teacher who needs one, and plans to deliver about 3,000 monitors at a value of around $430,000.

Started by a small group of Seattle startup veterans, Two Screens for Teachers aims to boost teacher productivity through added technology, helping to make remote instruction less stressful during the ongoing pandemic.

Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu are behind the idea. They previously co-founded Walk Score, a Seattle startup that sold to Redfin in 2014. Their hope is that their latest cause will spread beyond Seattle and they can inspire techies in other cities to purchase monitors for the thousands of teachers who need them.

PREVIOUSLY: Seattle startup vets launch ‘Two Screens for Teachers’ effort to help improve remote instruction

“I’ve spent my career in tech on two screens and can’t imagine working without them,” Lerner said in a news release. “During the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve asked our teachers to become tech experts, on top of doing the crucial job of educating our children. A second screen lets teachers see their students on one screen and their lesson plans on the other. This is a simple productivity solution that people in tech centers like Seattle take for granted.”

“Having two monitors is incredibly helpful for teaching,” Seattle elementary school teacher Jannah H. said. “I use my second monitor to display my lesson plans and weekly schedule. I also sometimes use it to keep the video of my student’s faces open while I open a lesson powerpoint on my computer.”

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Spark Turns On 5G In Auckland And Offers A Glimpse Into The Future Of Smart Cities

Spark turned on 5G in downtown Auckland today and has
partnered with Auckland Transport (AT) to showcase some of
the latest in IoT (Internet of Things) technology and
demonstrate what the future could look like for Auckland’s
CBD with the power of 5G.

5G is expected to underpin
the widespread deployment of IoT technology with its
increased speeds, low latency (or lag) and reliability. To
bring this potential to life, Spark and AT have installed
IoT enabled infrastructure at Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter –
including 5G connected lighting, smart benches with charging
capability, smart bins, and parking sensors.

Spark
Technology Lead, Renee Mateparae said: “We are excited to
launch our commercial 5G network in downtown Auckland today,
building on the private network we have in place to support
Emirates Team New Zealand and the launch of Spark Race Zone
last month. Our partnership with AT is about helping bring
to life the significant contribution 5G and IoT will make in
addressing urban, economic and sustainability challenges
across the country.

“5G will eventually allow for
one million devices to be connected per square kilometre on
a continual basis1, generating data that will help
Governments, Councils and businesses respond quickly,
allocate resources wisely and plan for the future, which
will ultimately improve services and amenities for New
Zealanders.

“We know from existing research that IoT
applications can improve quality of life significantly by
saving us time, improving health and safety outcomes,
reducing environmental impact, and boosting social
connectedness and civic participation,2” said
Renee.

Smart lighting has been installed in the
surrounding streets of Wynyard Quarter’s Innovation
Precinct, which can now generate heat maps of foot traffic
to help AT identify any ‘choke points’ to better inform
future infrastructure investments, as well as monitor air

China’s smaller cities spend the most on video games nationally: Report

People visit the stand of Tencent’s mobile game ‘Glory of Kings’ during the 2020 China Digital Entertainment Expo & Conference (ChinaJoy) at Shanghai New International Expo Center on July 31, 2020 in Shanghai, China.

Zhou You | VCG via Getty Images

SINGAPORE — Video games are booming in China’s smaller cities, with citizens there accounting for more than half of revenue nationally, according to a recent report by Niko Partners.

“76% of gamers in China live in Tier 3-5 cities, accounting for 70% of game revenue,” Niko Partners said in a synopsis of its China Gamers Report.

Cities in China are classified by tiers based loosely on population and economic size. For example, places such as capital Beijing and Shenzhen are generally considered tier-one cities, while lower-tier cities are smaller.

The country is the world’s top game market and will generate an estimated $40.85 billion in revenue this year, according to Newzoo.

“What we think is happening with the smaller tiers is … there are more and more gamers adapting to uses of mobile devices,” Lisa Cosmas Hanson, founder and president of Niko Partners, told CNBC in a follow-up interview.

With “fewer things to do for entertainment” in smaller cities as compared with their cosmopolitan peers in Beijing and Shanghai, “gamers spend their time with little cost entertainment which can be social.”

This could also be attributable to improved mobile data and broadband infrastructure, Hanson added, with “lots of Android smartphones available at lower price points.”

In a country of 1.4 billion people, even China’s smallest “cities” can have a population of more than 1 million each.

For video game publishers looking at China, the analyst said: “If you really want to draw the attention of people throughout the country, Tier 4, Tier 5, these places can’t be ignored.”

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Digital Twin technology leader Cityzenith pledges to reverse carbon emissions in our most polluted cities | News

CHICAGO, Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Cityzenith CEO Michael Jansen has launched a global ‘Clean Cities – Clean Future’ campaign to help our most polluted urban centres become carbon neutral, by donating the company’s Digital Twin platform SmartWorldPro2 to key cities, one at a time.

Cities produce more than 70%* of the earth’s greenhouse gases, but Jansen says use of cutting-edge data and AI will change this dramatically:

“Since our inception we have been using these tools to deliver custom climate resilience applications to greenfield cities, real estate developments, and infrastructure projects.

“We know the issues and now have the right data aggregation, analysis, and visualization capabilities to help solve them for cities, and those who design, build, and manage them.

“The world’s top 100 most-polluting cities produce 18%** of global urban emissions and we will meet this challenge head-on, by going right to the biggest contributors first. As one megacity reaps the benefits, so others and governments will follow their example. What works for one will work for all. That is the beauty of SmartWorldPro2.

“Launching this ‘Clean Cities – Clean Future’ initiative marks a milestone for us and shareable, networked, city-scale Digital Twin deployments. Digital Twins were first developed to aggregate, analyze, and visualize vastly complex information in manufacturing plants and building construction sites, but have evolved into a powerful aid to urban climate resilience and lowering carbon emissions.

“We’ve spoken publicly since 2013 about Digital Twin technology’s potential to accelerate energy transition and it’s now a reality. Early Cityzenith-led carbon emission reduction projects included efforts in San Francisco, Amsterdam, Barcelona, and Chicago. These culminated in a World Smart City Award recognition, plus a World Cities Summit Young Leader appointment and letter of support from the C40 Cities Climate Action Group to jointly

Smart Cities: Harnessing the Power of Technology in Local Government

The global economy is in constant turmoil, governments are challenged to provide levels of service that typically only private businesses can provide and disruptive technologies are transforming industry at a rapid pace. In this bold new era where change is unavoidable it is the innovative who are positioned to surely thrive.

In 2008, the global economy fell into recession; it was the most significant downturn since the Great Depression. Recovery has been a long and exasperating struggle; at times feeling like we are clinging to the edge of a cliff, desperately trying to hold on and weather-the-storm.

Some economists even predict we are on the verge of another global recession. Foreign and domestic factors are both significant contributors to the swelling pessimism; there is the unpredictability of Trump’s Tweets, the looming collapse of the Euro, the astonishingly low cost of crude oil, student loan debts suffocating young adults who are unable to contribute to economic growth and let’s not forget about the dreaded silver tsunami.

It’s fair to say the economic outlook for the United States and Canada is unsettling. As a result of financial uncertainty many government agencies across North America are seeing their budgets tightened, while expectations from constituents continue to rise. The public opinion towards government processes, civic services and budgetary spending has become progressively more volatile in recent years.

So, how does one do more with less? Well, when you consider that we live in a world where virtual reality, 3D printing, quadcopters, pocket-sized spectrometers, and self-driving cars are no longer simply things of science fiction, the answer may be staring us directly in the face.

There are a plethora of software solutions that assist with a wide range of government functions. The technologies available today disrupt the old ways of doing things; these are solutions …