Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science | News

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning landscape,

UJ’s computer science and software engineering academy turns 50

Professor Basie von Solms, co-founder of the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering.

Professor Basie von Solms, co-founder of the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering.

One of SA’s first independent computer science schools, the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering (ACSSE) in the Faculty of Science at the University of Johannesburg (UJ), is celebrating 50 years.

Co-founded in 1970 by professors Sebastiaan “Basie” von Solms and Andries van der Walt, ACSSE has since attained global status for its programmes.

Van der Walt and Von Solms were the first two staff members of the academy and the latter was head of computer science for 27 years.

The academy has a strong international research record, and is currently concentrating on areas related to the fourth industrial revolution.

ACSSE is also now heavily involved in research, focusing on cyber security, cyber counter-intelligence, artificial intelligence, intelligent software agents, Web services and biometric applications.

Von Solms says the department has made significant progress in population, infrastructure and access to technology in the last half-century. Presently, the academy has four sub-departments – Computer Science, Informatics, Information Security and the Centre for Cyber Security.

“Our degree courses have been structured on international standards and benchmarks. Therefore, in 2003, the four-year BSc (Honours) degree of the ACCSE was accredited by the BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, in the UK.

“At that stage, the ACCSE was the first university in Africa achieving such accreditation, and even today is one of only two such universities in Africa. Other universities enjoying such accreditation include the universities of Oxford and Cambridge,” he says.

“During these 50 years, the ACSSE has grown into an established knowledge centre for all aspects of information technology, and has kept track with the developments in the IT field.

“The ACSSE in the 1980s realised the importance of information security, and played a significant role to

Coding Is Just A Small Part Of Computer Science: SP Robotic Works’ Sneha Priya


bg pranav&sneha_sp robotic worksImage: P Ravi Kumar

Sneha Priya’s mantra to introduce any technology is simple: the right exposure at the right age. “It must not be the other way around—just making it compulsory for the kids,” says cofounder of SP Robotic Works. Decoding the hysteria around coding for children in India, Priya concedes that the way it (coding) is being communicated to the parents, and the kind of FOMO being created, is probably not going in the right direction. “But if a kid embraces coding, it will be useful for her future,” she says. 

Started in 2012 by Pranavan and Sneha Priya, SP Robotic Works is an online edutainment company that specialises in providing experiential learning to students between the ages of 7 and 17, in latest technologies such as robotics, coding, drone, AI, VR and IoT. The idea is to promote STEM education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) through AI-powered online learning platforms. “We have robotic courses designed in such a way that the child gets an exposure to all the components at an early age,” she says.

SP Robotic Works, which has over 80 branches across India apart from overseas presence, added one lakh students post pandemic. Stressing that the problem in the education system starts from an early age, when a child doesn’t get exposure or is not empowered to make the right choice later on, Priya contends that there are millions of engineers who made wrong decisions in opting for such a profession. “They were not given the right exposure at the right age,” she says, adding that career changes could’ve happened if the child had been exposed to options early on. Today, she lets on, if you ask any engineer or anybody the reason to opt for engineering, all of them will say it was

Commercially Available Silicon Quantum Computer Moves Forward With Quietest Bits On Record

KEY POINTS

  • Physicists achieve a noise level 10 times lower than the previous record
  • Demonstration proves to take a major step closer to a full-scale silicon quantum processor 
  • Next step could be a 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023

The lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit has been demonstrated by a team of quantum physicists, bringing the development of a commercially available silicon quantum computer one step forward to possibility. 

In a study published in Advanced Materials, the physicists said they were able to achieve a noise level 10 times lower than previously recorded for any semiconductor qubit. Specifically, they demonstrated a low-level charge noise of  S0 = 0.0088 ± 0.0004 μeV2 Hz−1. 

As a next step, the team is now looking forward to demonstrating the capability required to produce a reliable 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023. 

“Our team is now working towards delivering all of these key results on a single device – fast, stable, high fidelity and with long coherence times – moving a major step closer to a full-scale quantum processor in silicon,” Michelle Simmons, director for Center for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) and Scientia professor of quantum physics in the Faculty of Science at the University of New South Wales, said in a press release. 

The team explained that, for a silicon quantum computer to perform reliable and applicable solutions, it should generate quantum information close to 100% accuracy. However, achieving such accuracy was impossible due to what physicists call charge noise. 

Imperfections in the material environment that hosts qubits result in charge noise. It impedes the proper encoding of information on qubits, affecting the information accuracy altogether. By separating the qubits from the surface and interface states, the team was able to demonstrate the lowest noise

Senator Witkos Receives Computer Science Leadership Award

Press release from the Office of Senator Kevin Witkos:

Oct. 11, 2020

State Senator Kevin Witkos (R-Canton) is honored to announce that he has recently received a Leadership Award from the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) and ReadyCT for his work in supporting computer science education in Connecticut. The award was recently presented during the CSTA & ReadyCT Virtual Summit held on October 2nd.

“I am honored to have received this award and I’m so proud of the efforts we’ve made over the past few years in ensuring computer science becomes part of the curriculum for students across Connecticut and that our teachers recognize the importance of this field. With many industries and sectors of our economy becoming more technological and digital, computer science skills are more important than ever. I’m proud of the bipartisan work that went into passing this legislation and so thankful for the work of CSTA, ReadyCT, Code.Org, and all of the hard working educators and computer science advocates across Connecticut” said Senator Witkos.

“Last year I had the chance to visit with the Girls Who Code group at Avon High School and was extremely impressed by the passion that the students and their teachers share for coding. Coding is something that students of all ages can excel at and I’m excited for the future of computer science and coding in our schools” added Senator Witkos.

In 2019, Senator Witkos introduced a bill which ultimately became part of Public Act 19-128 An Act Concerning Computer Science Instruction in Public Schools.

Among other things, the bill does the following:

1. allows the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) to develop a model internship program for technology and advanced manufacturing (§ 7);

2. adds computer science to the Connecticut Employment and Training Commission’s (CETC) statewide plan regarding