Prime Day 2020 security camera deals: Get a Blink Mini for $25, Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera for $100

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

 Amazon Prime Day is a go, and if you’re raring to bag yourself a deal on a security camera there are lots of options available. We’ve got all of the best Prime Day deals covered elsewhere, but we’re here to talk exclusively on home security cameras. There are some great savings to be had on products from ArloRing and Blink — we especially like the Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera for $200.

If you don’t see what you’re looking for right now be sure to check back — we’ll be updating the deals as Prime Day goes on.

Currently available

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, which retails for $130, is $30 off for Prime Day. At $100, The Essential Spotlight Camera has HD live streaming, alerts, a built-in siren and spotlight — and optional advanced features with the Arlo Smart cloud subscription plan.

Amazon also has a deal on an Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera multi-pack for Prime Day — $300 for three cameras (save $50). 

Read the review.

Arlo

The battery-powered Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera is an excellent outdoor light fixture-security camera hybrid. Typically retailing for $250, it’s $50 for Prime Day. Like the Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, the Pro 3 Floodlight has HD live streaming, motion alerts, a built-in light fixture and siren — and more if you subscribe to the optional Arlo Smart service.

Read the review.

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Blink Mini is one of the Amazon brand’s newer indoor security cameras — and it typically costs $35. Now, with a $10 discount, you can snag one for just $25. It’s similar to the Wyze

Prime Day 2020 security camera deals: Blink Mini for $25, Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera for $100

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

 Amazon Prime Day is here, and if you’re raring to bag yourself a deal on a security camera there are lots of options available. We’ve got all of the best Prime Day deals covered elsewhere, but we’re here to talk exclusively on home security cameras. There are some great savings to be had on products from ArloRing and Blink — we especially like the Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera for $200.

If you don’t see what you’re looking for right now be sure to check back — we’ll be updating the deals as Prime Day goes on.

Currently available

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, which retails for $130, is $30 off for Prime Day. At $100, The Essential Spotlight Camera has HD live streaming, alerts, a built-in siren and spotlight — and optional advanced features with the Arlo Smart cloud subscription plan.

Amazon also has a deal on an Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera multi-pack for Prime Day — $300 for three cameras (save $50). 

Read the review.

Arlo

The battery-powered Arlo Pro 3 Floodlight Camera is an excellent outdoor light fixture-security camera hybrid. Typically retailing for $250, it’s $50 for Prime Day. Like the Arlo Essential Spotlight Camera, the Pro 3 Floodlight has HD live streaming, motion alerts, a built-in light fixture and siren — and more if you subscribe to the optional Arlo Smart service.

Read the review.

Megan Wollerton/CNET

The Blink Mini is one of the Amazon brand’s newer indoor security cameras — and it typically costs $35. Now, with a $10 discount, you can snag one for just $25. It’s similar to the Wyze Cam

10 Essential Leadership Qualities For The Age Of Artificial Intelligence

AI and automation will change the very nature of work. It’s really important that leaders don’t ignore this AI- and data-driven revolution – what I call the “intelligence revolution” – or allow other leaders in the organization to ignore it. Working out how to use AI, dealing with people-related challenges, avoiding the ethical pitfalls of AI, making sure you have the right technology in place, and so on – all are key considerations for the business leaders of today and tomorrow.

This technology revolution will change what it means to be a good leader. It makes sense, then, that business leaders in the intelligence revolution will need to adapt. The way we run businesses will change, and the successful leaders of the future will need a slightly different skillset from the traditional skills associated with leaders.

What sort of skills are we talking about? I believe successful leaders in the intelligence revolution will need to cultivate the following 10 leadership skills:

1. Agility. The pace of change, particularly with AI, is astonishing. Leaders must therefore be able to embrace and celebrate change (including new technologies). And, importantly, they should not view change as a burden, but see it as an opportunity to grow and innovate, both at an individual and organizational level.

2. Emotional intelligence. As more and more workplace activities become automated, softer skills like emotional intelligence and empathy will become more critical for human workers. And if we expect the workplaces of the future to prioritize such human skills, it stands to reason that leaders must model these behaviors themselves.

3. Cultural intelligence. The workplaces of the future will be even more diverse, global and dispersed than they are today. Effective leaders will be able to

4 Essential Tasks New Bootstrapped Businesses Should Outsource


5 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


When you’re bootstrapping your startup, it can be tempting to try to do everything yourself in an attempt to save money. After all, when you don’t have VC backing on your side, you have to stretch every dollar!

However, a do-it-all mentality could ultimately backfire in the long run. If you want to make the most of your financial resources and achieve the growth that will take your startup to the next level, you’re going to have to outsource.

No matter what industry you’re working in, each startup will have essential, time-consuming tasks that can easily take your attention away from the big-picture issues that affect your company’s long-term health. Ignoring these “everyday” tasks will limit your growth — but so will spending too much of your own time on them.

The solution, of course, is strategically outsourcing tasks.

1. Accounting and bookkeeping

Knowing how your money is being spent and where your revenue is coming from is vital for any bootstrapped business — but crunching the numbers is far more complicated than you might think. This is one area where even a seemingly tiny error could have big ramifications for your business.

It’s generally recommended that you outsource this work to bookkeepers, who accurately record all financial information associated with your business, as well as accountants, who use this information to prepare tax documents and profit and loss statements. Making use of both will take a lot of responsibilities off your plate, eliminating a major stressor for startup founders.

Yahoo Small Business estimates that outsourcing these tasks can reduce monthly bookkeeping costs by 40 percent. Even more importantly, you don’t run the risk of making an error that gets you into tax trouble or puts

Why Doubt Is Essential to Science

The confidence people place in science is frequently based not on what it really is, but on what people would like it to be. When I asked students at the beginning of the year how they would define science, many of them replied that it is an objective way of discovering certainties about the world. But science cannot provide certainties. For example, a majority of Americans trust science as long as it does not challenge their existing beliefs. To the question “When science disagrees with the teachings of your religion, which one do you believe?,” 58 percent of North Americans favor religion; 33 percent science; and 6 percent say “it depends.”


But doubt in science is a feature, not a bug. Indeed, the paradox is that science, when properly functioning, questions accepted facts and yields both new knowledge and new questions—not certainty. Doubt does not create trust, nor does it help public understanding. So why should people trust a process that seems to require a troublesome state of uncertainty without always providing solid solutions?


As a historian of science, I would argue that it’s the responsibility of scientists and historians of science to show that the real power of science lies precisely in what is often perceived as its weakness: its drive to question and challenge a hypothesis. Indeed, the scientific approach requires changing our understanding of the natural world whenever new evidence emerges from either experimentation or observation. Scientific findings are hypotheses that encompass the state of knowledge at a given moment. In the long run, many of are challenged and even overturned. Doubt might be troubling, but it impels us towards a better understanding; certainties, as reassuring as they may seem, in fact undermine the scientific process.

Scientists understand this, but in the dynamic between the public and