Get Real Launches New Advisory Firm To Help Clients Imagine And Leverage Virtual Reality And Augmented Reality Technology To Improve The Way They Work

CHICAGO, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Get Real, a Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality (VR/AR) advisory firm, publicly launched today to help businesses and not for profits implement VR and AR technologies that dramatically improve and scale their organizations. Clients will benefit from Get Real’s team of professionals that combine several decades of experience in leveraging emerging technology and integrated platforms to solve real-world business challenges and create sustainable competitive advantages.

“We’re excited to help our clients discover Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in its early stages, establish themselves as leaders amongst their peers, and maintain a competitive edge for years to come,” said Rob Merrilees, Get Real Co-Founder. “Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality technology is ready for business applications today. It has the ability to change how organizations train, collaborate, market, visualize data, gather, educate, and raise money.”

Get Real works with clients to match them with best-in-class providers of VR and AR solutions through its Get Real Partner Alliance (GRPA). The GRPA covers innovative VR and AR platforms across a wide variety of industries and leading providers of collaboration tools, data visualization software, training software, 360-degree video, and custom game engine development.

“The breadth and depth of the GRPA allows us to see how advances in VR/AR technology in one industry will foreshadow future innovation in other industries,” said Ed Haravon, Get Real Co-founder. “Our clients will benefit from the combination of the GRPA and our team’s long history of deploying emerging technology to create significant advantages in order to increase the scale and profitability of businesses.”

Get Real is the fourth company Rob Merrilees has founded or co-founded. In 1999, he founded Spot Trading, one of the first entirely off-floor proprietary trading firms in the U.S. In 2001, he also co-founded YJT Solutions (now

Russian-US crew launches on fast track to the space station

MOSCOW (AP) — A trio of space travelers launched successfully to the International Space Station, for the first time using a fast-track maneuver to reach the orbiting outpost in just three hours.

NASA’s Kate Rubins along with Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos lifted off as scheduled Wednesday morning from the Russia-leased Baikonur space launch facility in Kazakhstan for a six-month stint on the station.

For the first time, they tried a two-orbit approach and docked with the space station in just a little over three hours after lift-off. Previously it took twice as long for crews to reach the station.


They will join the station’s NASA commander, Chris Cassidy, and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner, who have been aboard the complex since April and are scheduled to return to Earth in a week.

Speaking during Tuesday’s pre-launch news conference at Baikonur, Rubins emphasized that the crew spent weeks in quarantine at the Star City training facility outside Moscow and then on Baikonur to avoid any threat from the coronavirus.

“We spent two weeks at Star City and then 17 days at Baikonur in a very strict quarantine,” Rubins said. “During all communications with crew members, we were wearing masks. We made PCR tests twice and we also made three times antigen fast tests.”

She said she was looking forward to scientific experiments planned for the mission.

“We’re planning to try some really interesting things like bio-printing tissues and growing cells in space and, of course, continuing our work on sequencing DNA,” Rubins said.

Ryzhikov, who will be the station’s skipper, said the crew will try to pinpoint the exact location of a leak at a station’s Russian section that has slowly leaked oxygen. The small leak hasn’t posed any immediate danger to

Russia launches fresh crew to ISS on fast-track journey

The three-member crew launched from the Russian-operated Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan
The three-member crew launched from the Russian-operated Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan

Two cosmonauts and a NASA astronaut blasted off on a fast-track journey to the International Space Station Wednesday, in the first such launch aboard a Russian capsule since SpaceX’s game-changing debut manned flight from US soil.


Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of Roscosmos and NASA’s Kathleen Rubins launched from the Russian-operated Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 0545 GMT on Wednesday.

A NASA TV commentator said everything was normal, citing communications between Russian mission control and the crew, while Roscosmos said the capsule had successfully gone into orbit.

Their journey will be the first manned flight to the ISS to last just over three hours before docking—a new fast-track profile that takes half the time of standard trips to the orbital lab.

Only an unmanned Progress cargo space ship has previously used this profile, which requires just two orbits before docking.

Stringent precautions, including tighter quarantine and mask-wearing before launch, have been taken due to the coronavirus pandemic but the astronauts and space officials have rejected any concerns about a risk of infection on the station.

‘Incredibly lucky’

The launch is sandwiched between two SpaceX launches—the first manned spaceflights to the ISS under NASA’s aegis since 2011.

The International Space Station crew of NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchk
The International Space Station crew of NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov

Before May 30, when US astronauts Robert Behnken and Doug Hurley arrived at the ISS, Russia and Baikonur had enjoyed a lucrative monopoly on manned missions to the ISS.

The NASA duo returned safely on August 2 and a fresh SpaceX launch, this time anticipating a full-length half-year mission at the space station, is expected next month.

The emergence of private players SpaceX and Boeing—part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program—has fuelled talk of a new

Avius Launches Gestures – Touchless Customer Feedback Technology

ORLANDO, Fla., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Customers who wish to provide feedback at a business no longer need to physically touch a survey screen. Avius, a leading tech company that provides real-time customer feedback solutions, today launched Gestures, a touchless AI-powered thumbs up / thumbs down survey experience. The innovative technology has launched at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL), the busiest airport in the world, and at LEGOLAND Florida.

The pandemic has quickly created a new operating environment for businesses who are now more than ever embracing touchless technology. Avius predicted early on during the pandemic that touchless would play an important role in society moving forward. Customers are also demanding clean and safe ways to interact with technology. Gestures provides a fast and easy touchless way to gather information from experience feedback surveys so businesses can ensure they are meeting and exceeding expectations for customers and their employees.

“We are incredibly excited to usher in a new era of feedback, using natural human gestures – recognized by advanced artificial intelligence built-in to our kiosks – to enable people to provide touch-free feedback fast,” said Ben Story, co-founder and chief executive officer, Avius. “Customers have been telling us they want to collect feedback in hygiene sensitive scenarios, what better way to do that than using gestures? They are universal around the world and online – everyone understands what they mean, and you can see the respondents’ delight when leaving feedback this way.”

To engage with Gestures, customers simply stand in front of a kiosk terminal, show a thumbs up for a good experience or a thumbs down to report a not so positive experience. An animation and sound will notify that the response has been successfully recorded. In addition to singular questions, Gestures can also be used for

Many things to many people: Panasonic launches DC-BGH1 modular ‘box’ camera: Digital Photography Review

Panasonic has announced a new Micro Four Thirds video camera, the Lumix DC-BGH1. This box-style camera is built around a 10.2MP Live MOS sensor. Based on specs, the BGH1 might appear to be essentially a Panasonic GH5S minus the screen and controls, and to some degree, it is. Still, Panasonic has included several features that are rather interesting.

The aluminum and magnesium alloy body is relatively small, at 93mm per side and 78mm deep (3.66 x 3.07 inches). Notably, the camera lacks both a viewfinder and a screen but includes eleven 1/4″-20 sockets for mounting accessories or a tripod. An integrated fan and internal heat dispersion system allow for unlimited record times, and a hot shoe mount on top of the camera can be used to mount a microphone or Panasonic’s DMW-XLR1 XLR adapter.

Camera controls include a dial with a four-way controller on top, several dedicated function buttons and three custom function buttons.

The BGH1 also has very different ports than your typical Micro Four Thirds camera. For example, there’s an ethernet port that can utilize Power over Ethernet+ to power the camera over ethernet in addition to transmitting video signal and camera control.

The BGH1 can be controlled entirely over ethernet using Panasonic’s Lumix Tether app. Additionally, Panasonic’s Lumix Tether for Multicam app will allow a single computer to control up to 12 BGH1 cameras simultaneously, all with Power over Ethernet if the network supports it. Panasonic says a future firmware update will add support for IP streaming over ethernet.

On the back of the camera, you’ll find three BNC connectors that support 3G SDI-out, timecode in/out, and genlock, which is useful for syncing cameras on multi-cam setups. There are also full-sized HDMI-out and USB-C (USB 3.1) connections. The USB-C, SDI and HDMI ports can all provide video